A Companion to Marx s Capital

A Companion to Marx s Capital

A Companion to Marx s Capital

Readers of this book might also enjoy David Harvey's lectures online.

A Companion To Marx s Capital

A Companion To Marx s Capital

A Companion To Marx s Capital

The biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression shows no sign of coming to a close and Marx’s work remains key in understanding the cycles that lead to recession. For nearly forty years, David Harvey has written and lectured on Capital, becoming one of the world’s most foremost Marx scholars. Based on his recent lectures, and following the success of his companion to the first volume of Capital, Harvey turns his attention to Volume 2, aiming to bring his depth of learning to a broader audience, guiding first-time readers through a fascinating and hitherto neglected text. Whereas Volume 1 focuses on production, Volume 2 looks at how the circuits of capital, the buying and selling of goods, realize value. This is a must-read for everyone concerned to acquire a fuller understanding of Marx’s political economy.

The Endless Crisis

The Endless Crisis

The Endless Crisis

The days of boom and bubble are over, and the time has come to understand the long-term economic reality. Although the Great Recession officially ended in June 2009, hopes for a new phase of rapid economic expansion were quickly dashed. Instead, growth has been slow, unemployment has remained high, wages and benefits have seen little improvement, poverty has increased, and the trend toward more inequality of incomes and wealth has continued. It appears that the Great Recession has given way to a period of long-term anemic growth, which Foster and McChesney aptly term the Great Stagnation. This incisive and timely book traces the origins of economic stagnation and explains what it means for a clear understanding of our current situation. The authors point out that increasing monopolization of the economy—when a handful of large firms dominate one or several industries—leads to an over-abundance of capital and too few profitable investment opportunities, with economic stagnation as the result. Absent powerful stimuli to investment, such as historic innovations like the automobile or major government spending, modern capitalist economies have become increasingly dependent on the financial sector to realize profits. And while financialization may have provided a temporary respite from stagnation, it is a solution that cannot last indefinitely, as instability in financial markets over the last half-decade has made clear.

A Return to Marx and Then Beyond

A Return to Marx   and Then Beyond

A Return to Marx and Then Beyond

"Capitalism - Marx and Beyond" examines the current bourgeoisie capitalism. Capitalism is addressed as a unique concrete historically reality. This mode of production inherits traditional pre modern social forms that are cultivated as national identities. National sentiments are expressed as honor of possessions that are identified through diverse "we" and preserved as "our values". Capitalism transforms and modifies such pre modern heritages into an undistinguishable mix of both modern and pre modern social forms. Focus in this book will be on the unique material features of capitalism.Attention will be provided to the works of Karl Marx, particularly the second volume of Capital, where Marx apparently got stuck. His deadlock indicates a serious deficit associated with investigations of accumulation and innovation. Innovation and accumulation will, in this book, be linked to uncertainty and reoccurring crises that signify the incapacities of the capitalist system to operate as a viable mode of production.In the theory of value, Marx places human social labor in a unique historical position, where social labor is applied together with previously produced means in order to deliver new output. Anarchism and the insufficiency to provide necessary and appropriate output causes disturbances and crises.Several critical examinations of selected views on crises, uncertainties and dysfunctions of capitalism are offered. Selected strategies based on monetary solutions and financial instruments aim to regenerate balance. Rather than gaining a balance, reoccurring disruptive circumstances are assumed to be the normal state of affairs. Michael J. Piore and Charles F. Sabel and The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity from 1984 draws attention to a strategy based on a system of flexible specialization accompanying the introduction of Information and Communication Technology. Their second historical divide associated with the new production strategy is critically examined.Thomas Piketty and his Capital in the Twenty-First Century from 2014 emphasizes capital, wealth distribution and inequality. A critical account of the concept of capital is a paramount assignment in the critical investigations into his contribution.Marx is offered another chance through the critical investigations of some basic concepts introduced by David Harvey in A Companion to Marx's Capital, Volume 2 from 2013. Harvey's emphasis on the role of credit and finance are critically investigated and justifies an alternative return to Marx.A renewed interpretation of Marx corresponds with his assumption that a balanced and stable economy is an illusion. Capitalism has to accumulate and create the necessary flexibility in order to reproduce. On the other hand, this system of accumulation is anarchic, arbitrary and contradictory.Identification of sources for flexibility and accumulation becomes a deadlock for Marx. Innovation is insufficiently accounted for in his analysis. A serious deficit with his whole position emerges that paves the way for an alternative beyond Marx.The alternative beyond Marx draws attention to a wider context of the critical investigations. Some philosophical implications concerning the concepts of freedom, independence, determinism and randomness are touched upon. Implications for the much-debated concepts of basis and superstructure are addressed. The consequences for the future possibility for the human species to cope with crises and other aspects of our destiny are sketched.

Capitalism

Capitalism

Capitalism

""Capitalism - Marx and Beyond" examines the current bourgeoisie capitalism. Capitalism is addressed as a unique concrete historically reality. This mode of production inherits traditional pre modern social forms that are cultivated as national identities. National sentiments are expressed as honor of possessions that are identified through diverse "we" and preserved as "our values". Capitalism transforms and modifies such pre modern heritages into an undistinguishable mix of both modern and pre modern social forms. Focus in this book will be on the unique material features of capitalism. Attention will be provided to the works of Karl Marx, particularly the second volume of Capital, where Marx apparently got stuck. His deadlock indicates a serious deficit associated with investigations of accumulation and innovation. Innovation and accumulation will, in this book, be linked to uncertainty and reoccurring crises that signify the incapacities of the capitalist system to operate as a viable mode of production. In the theory of value, Marx places human social labor in a unique historical position, where social labor is applied together with previously produced means in order to deliver new output. Anarchism and the insufficiency to provide necessary and appropriate output causes disturbances and crises. Several critical examinations of selected views on crises, uncertainties and dysfunctions of capitalism are offered. Selected strategies based on monetary solutions and financial instruments aim to regenerate balance. Rather than gaining a balance, reoccurring disruptive circumstances are assumed to be the normal state of affairs. Michael J. Piore and Charles F. Sabel and The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity from 1984 draws attention to a strategy based on a system of flexible specialization accompanying the introduction of Information and Communication Technology. Their second historical divide associated with the new production strategy is critically examined. Thomas Piketty and his Capital in the Twenty-First Century from 2014 emphasizes capital, wealth distribution and inequality. A critical account of the concept of capital is a paramount assignment in the critical investigations into his contribution. Marx is offered another chance through the critical investigations of some basic concepts introduced by David Harvey in A Companion to Marx's Capital, Volume 2 from 2013. Harvey's emphasis on the role of credit and finance are critically investigated and justifies an alternative return to Marx. A renewed interpretation of Marx corresponds with his assumption that a balanced and stable economy is an illusion. Capitalism has to accumulate and create the necessary flexibility in order to reproduce. On the other hand, this system of accumulation is anarchic, arbitrary and contradictory. Identification of sources for flexibility and accumulation becomes a deadlock for Marx. Innovation is insufficiently accounted for in his analysis. A serious deficit with his whole position emerges that paves the way for an alternative beyond Marx. The alternative beyond Marx draws attention to a wider context of the critical investigations. Some philosophical implications concerning the concepts of freedom, independence, determinism and randomness are touched upon. Implications for the much-debated concepts of basis and superstructure are addressed. The consequences for the future possibility for the human species to cope with crises and other aspects of our destiny are sketched"--

Capitalism

Capitalism

Capitalism

In the most complete, accurate and accessible presentation of Karl Marx’s theory of capitalism to date, Johan Fornäs presents a guide for anyone who wants to understand how today’s crisis-ridden society has emerged and is able to sustain and intensify its own deep inner contradictions. Capitalism clearly explains these contradictions, which are so relevant again today in the wake of the financial crisis. This clear and engaging guide explains capitalism for absolute beginners. Fornäs situates Marx’s ideas in context, remaining faithful to the concepts and structure of his work. This complete introduction to Marx’s economy critique covers all three volumes of Capital. It explores all the main aspects of Marx’s work – including his economic theory, his philosophical sophistication and his political critique – introducing the reader to Marx’s typical blend of sharp arguments, ruthless social reportage and utopian visions. This book will be of interest to students throughout the social sciences and humanities, including those studying sociology, social theory, economics, business studies, history, cultural studies, and politics.

The Constitution of Capital

The Constitution of Capital

The Constitution of Capital

The essays in this important collection address specific themes at the cutting edge of recent Marxist scholarship. Although each essay can be read independently, they are united in arguing for, and demonstrating, a new focus on capitalism as a historically specific social form and in stressing the monetary nature of Marx's value theory, challenging traditional Marxist, institutionalist and neo-Schumpeterian readings of Marx's theories of money, value, surplus value and capital accumulation. The studies aim to shed new light on Marx's great work while going beyond it in many respects. The book will be welcomed by economists with an interest in the history, philosophy and methodology of economic thought as well as scholars and students of Marx. The book may also be read as an introduction to Marx's trilogy and is a companion to the collections of essays by the same contributors: The Circulation of Capital: Essays on Volume II of Marx's 'Capital'(ed. Arthur and Reuten, 1998); and The Culmination of Capital: Essays on Volume III of Marx's 'Capital' (ed. Campbell and Reuten, 2002).

Bookseller

Bookseller

Bookseller


The Limits to Capital

The Limits to Capital

The Limits to Capital

On its first appearance in 1982, David Harvey's Limits to Capital was described in Monthly Review as 'a unique and insightful theory of capital', and praised in Environment and Planning as 'a magnificent achievement, [one of] the most complete, readable, lucid and least partisan exegesis, critique and extension of Marx's mature political economy available.' This new edition links a general Marxian theory of financial and geographical crises with the incredible turmoil now being experienced in world markets. In his analyses of 'fictitious capital' and 'uneven geographical development,' Harvey takes the reader step by step through layers of crisis formation, beginning with Marx's controversial argument concerning the falling rate of profit, moving through crises of credit and finance, and closing with a timely analysis of geo-political and geographical considerations. Recently referred to by Fredric Jameson in New Left Review as a 'magisterial work,' The Limits to Capital provides one of the best theoretical guides to the contradictory forms found in the historical and geographical dynamics of capitalist development.

Neofunctionalist Sociology

Neofunctionalist Sociology

Neofunctionalist Sociology

Neofunctionalist Sociology features provocative theoretical and empirical statements that attempt to revise and redirect the orthodox functionalist tradition. This important collection includes essays by internationally recognized social scientists including Jeffrey Alexander, Bernard Barber, S.N. Eisenstadt, Miriam Johnson, Niklas Luhmann, Richard Münch, Roland Robertson and several younger scholars. The first part of the volume presents the theoretical and ideological positions claimed by neofunctionalists, while the second highlights neofunctionalist research programs in cultural sociology, social change, the professions and inequality, political sociology and feminist sociology.