A Passion for Joyce

A Passion for Joyce

A Passion for Joyce

The extant letter written to each other by the renowned Joyce scholars, Hugh Kenner and Adaline Glasheen between 1953 and 1984.

I Dare You

I Dare You

I Dare You

I Dare You is The Purpose-Driven Life, Joyce Meyer style! Joyce Meyer explains that a life without purpose is a life not worth living. We all need a reason to get up every day. We all need a reason to reach for something beyond ourselves. Over the centuries, millions of people have asked, 'What am I here for? What is my purpose?' The more important question is 'How can I live today?' Taking responsibility for how we live takes courage. To accept life as it is comes to us and to be determined to make the most we can out of it is a big challenge. Joyce challenges her readers to make sure they live their lives with purpose and passion.

A Passion for Music

A Passion for Music

A Passion for Music


Joyce s Catholic Comedy of Language

Joyce s Catholic Comedy of Language

Joyce s Catholic Comedy of Language

Neither simple apostate nor obedient Christian, James Joyce developed a uniquely ambivalent attitude toward his Irish Catholic roots—one that became inscribed in his imagination and served as a constant aesthetic focus and symbolic source in his fiction. In this study, Beryl Schlossman traces the theological and liturgical echoes that resonate in Joyce's work, particularly in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, and argues that the writer's special brand of Catholicism necessitates a double reading of the fiction. Confronting the Catholic Word with Celtic wit, she suggests, Joyce's world is an interrelated blend of the sacred and the comic, the deeply religious and the obscene, the defiant, the blasphemous. Students, scholars, and readers of Joyce, modern or comparative literature, contemporary criticism, and theology will find this a comprehensive and convincing study that illuminates the themes, poetic language, and central paradox of Joyce's art.

Religion and Aesthetic Experience in Joyce and Yeats

Religion and Aesthetic Experience in Joyce and Yeats

Religion and Aesthetic Experience in Joyce and Yeats

This monograph is based on archival research and close readings of James Joyce's and W. B. Yeats's poetics and political aesthetics. Georges Sorel's theory of social myth is used as a starting point for exploring the ways in which the experience of art can be seen as a form of religious experience.

James Joyce

James Joyce

James Joyce

Presents twelve critical essays on the Irish writer and his works.

Joyce

Joyce

Joyce

Did James Joyce, that icon of modernity, spearhead the dismantling of the Cartesian subject? Or was he a supreme example of a modern man forever divided and never fully known to himself? This volume reads the dialogue of contradictory cultural voices in Joyce’s works—revolutionary and reactionary, critical and subject to critique, marginal and central. It includes ten essays that identify repressed elements in Joyce’s writings and examine how psychic and cultural repressions persistently surface in his texts. Contributors include Joseph A. Boone, Marilyn L. Brownstein, Jay Clayton, Laura Doyle, Susan Stanford Friedman, Christine Froula, Ellen Carol Jones, Alberto Moreirias, Richard Pearce, and Robert Spoo.

Joyce s The Dead

Joyce s The Dead

Joyce s The Dead


Shakespeare and Joyce

Shakespeare and Joyce

Shakespeare and Joyce

After God, Shakespeare created most, James Joyce wrote in Ulysses. The importance of Shakespeare in Ulysses has been often discussed and documented; that this royal bard is as central and omnipresent in Finnegans Wake has been roundly agreed upon by Joyce scholars, yet no printed volume has exhaustively investigated the topic. This study arrives, therefore, as a welcome and timely look into the assertion, as on critic put it, that "Finnegans Wake is about Shakespeare." "Throughout his life," Dr. Cheng writes, "Joyce was in the habit of comparing himself to England's national poet." In the Wake, Shakespeare--his life, his plays and his characters--forms a "dense and extensive matrix of allusion." Part I of this book provides a critical and interpretative view of how Shakespearean influences and allusions illuminate the themes and meanings of the Wake; the chapters are arranged to follow general patterns of allusion and motif. Part II comprises explications of a thousand Shakespearean allusions in Finnegans Wake, recorded by page and line of the novel. Finally, Part III is a set of appendixes which list the Shakespearean allusions by play, act, scene, and line for easy reference.