A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

Arguably one of Italy’s greatest contemporary writers, Natalia Ginzburg has been best known in America as a writer’s writer, quiet beloved of her fellow wordsmiths. This collection of personal essays chosen by the eminent American writer Lynne Sharon Schwartz from four of Ginzburg’s books written over the course of Ginzburg’s lifetime was a many-years long project for Schwartz. These essays are deeply felt, but also disarmingly accessible. Full of self-doubt and searing insight, Ginzburg is merciless in her attempts to describe herself and her world—and yet paradoxically, her self-deprecating remarks reveal her deeper confidence in her own eye and writing ability, as well as the weight and nuance of her exploration of the conflict between humane values and bureaucratic rigidity.

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

My birthplace, Gordon, Ohio, was thought to be the place to live in Darke County, Ohio. It was carved out of a vast wilderness that was ripe with wolves, bear and screaming panthers. Newspaper columns proclaimed its potential and how it would become a big town-larger than Arcanum and rivaling Greenville, the county seat.

A Place to Live and Work

A Place to Live and Work

A Place to Live and Work

A rich history of the unique relationship between life and work in an American factory town from 1840 to 1984, A Place to Live and Work tells the remarkable story of Henry Disston's saw manufacturing company and the factory town he built. The book provides a rare view of the rise of one of America's largest and most powerful family-owned businesses, from its modest beginnings in 1840 to the 1940s, when Disston products were known worldwide, to the sale and demise of the company in the postwar years. Henry Disston, however, not only built a factory; he also shaped Tacony, the town in northeastern Philadelphia where the workers lived. The book describes the company's interdependence with the community and profiles the lifestyle that grew out of Disston's paternalistic blueprint for Tacony. Using original letter books, shop committee meeting notes, photographs, and a wealth of other documents, Harry Silcox reveals Disston's highly sophisticated distribution and marketing system as well as a management system that, unlike the one advocated by Frederick Winslow Taylor, responded to the concerns of workers and foremen. Through two world wars, the Depression, and the rise of unions, Disston's innovative business practices enabled the company to remain active and strong even when factories across the nation were failing. This study raises important questions about the demise of the factory system and its impact on urban communities and family life. The Disston company provides one example of how people could work and live together successfully within the larger framework of the factory system.

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live brings together in a single volume an introduction to Yi Chung-hwan’s (1690–1756) T’aengniji (Treatise on Choosing Settlement)—one of the most widely read and influential of the Korean classics—and an annotated translation of the text, including the author’s postscript. Yi composed the T’aengniji in the 1750s, a time when, despite King Yŏngjo’s (r. 1724–1776) policy of impartiality, the scholar-gentry class continued to identifiy strongly with literati factions and to participate in the political scene as such. A prominent secretary who had his career cut short because of suspected involvement in one of the largest literati purges at court, Yi endured long periods of living in exile before finishing the T’aengniji in his early sixties. The treatise, his only substantial work, is based largely on his travels throughout the Korean peninsula and presents not only his views on the desirability of places for settlement, but also his opinions on contemporary matters and criticism of government policy. As a result, the T’aengniji circulated as an anonymous work for many years. Employing the latest research on T’aengniji manuscripts, translator Inshil Yoon maintains in her introduction that the original title of the treatise was Sadaebu kagŏch’ŏ (Livable Places for the Scholar-Gentry); she goes on to discuss in detail its reception by premodern and contemporary scholars and the treatise’s ongoing popularity as evidenced by the numerous versions and translations done in this and the previous century, its having been made into a novel, and current usage of “t’aengniji” as a noun meaning “regional geography” or “travelogue.” The present translation is based on the Chosŏn Kwangmunhoe edition.

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

Be it a house or a makeshift, a shared or rented room, or a home of one's own, a place to live is central in the survival strategies of all urban households. In this volume the above authors explore the gendered experiences of housing and housing rights in African countries. The collection begins with articles on conceptual and methodological problems in gender-aware research. The following articles present cases showing a wide variety in housing experiences, a variety which depends on urban setting, tenure forms, stage in the life cycle or other factors. There are many differences but also many similarities in the pattern of women not having the same access and control over housing as men have. While women are often the main bread-winners, they are also the home-makers, in the literal sense that it is women who put intense efforts into making a place home.

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live

A Place to Live provides captivating insights into the rich tapestry of meaning that fashioned the Red Location into the township that it became, and the many stalwarts that contributed to its vibrant and interesting history. Vuyisile Msila has masterfully interwoven history with visual images and actual accounts of people?s lived experiences to relate the picturesque and colourful story of the Red Location from the colonial to apartheid and post-apartheid eras, spanning a period of a hundred and ten years from 1903 to 2013.ÿ

Everybody Needs a Place to Live

Everybody Needs a Place to Live

Everybody Needs a Place to Live

This little book gives you the A to Z of rental property. Learn how to buy it, prepare it, find good renters, maintain it, and make money almost effortlessly while doing it. Author Nancy Janorschke has been managing rental property for 30 years and is still having fun doing it. "I've met so many wonderful people over the years and feel so good when I can help someone find a nice place to live. Everybody truly does need a place to live." Her book on Successful Management of Rental Property is just the ticket if you want to enter the lucrative housing and real estate management market.

Independent Living A Place to Live Gr 9 12

Independent Living  A Place to Live Gr  9 12

Independent Living A Place to Live Gr 9 12

**This is the chapter slice "A Place to Live Gr. 9-12+" from the full lesson plan "Practical Life Skills - Independent Living"** Students gain the skills to live independently. Understand the difference between renting and buying a home. Then, become familiar with the expenses associated with living alone. From there, get to know bus routes to determine the fastest way to get around. Be prepared in case of fire with your own fire route plan. Find out how saving energy will save money. Finally, get to know who to contact in case of injury. Comprised of reading passages, graphic organizers, real-world activities, crossword, word search and comprehension quiz, our resource combines high interest concepts with low vocabulary to ensure all learners comprehend the essential skills required in life. All of our content is reproducible and aligned to your State Standards and are written to Bloom's Taxonomy.

A Place to Live is the Place to Start

A Place to Live is the Place to Start

A Place to Live is the Place to Start