A User Interface Is Like A Joke

A User Interface Is Like A Joke

A User Interface Is Like A Joke

Are you looking for a great gift idea for a Graphic Designer, Webdesigner or Artist? This notebook is sure to make for great laughs! This is an empty dot grid notebook / journal to write in. Perfect for taking notes, doodling, brainstorming, and sketching ideas. Not too thick & not too thin, so it's a great size to throw in your car or bag! Details: Dot Grid Pages 120 pages 6 inches x 9 inches Soft Matte Cover White paper

Hierarchical User Interface Component Architecture

Hierarchical User Interface Component Architecture

Hierarchical User Interface Component Architecture

User Interfaces (UI) of applications, since about 2010, are usually implemented by dedicated frontend programs, following a Rich-Client architecture and are based on the Web technologies HTML, CSS and JavaScript. This approach provides great flexibility and power, but comes with an inherent great overall complexity of UIs, running on a continuously changing technology stack. This is because since over twenty years Web technologies still progress at an extremely high invention rate and unfortunately at the same time still regularly reinvent part of their self. This situation is harmless for small UIs, consisting of just a handful dialogs and having to last for just about one or two years. However, it becomes a major hurdle for large UIs, consisting of a few hundred dialogs and having to last for five or more years. This is especially the case for the complex UIs of industrial Business Information Systems. The main scientific contribution of this dissertation is the Hierarchical User Interface Component Architecture (HUICA), a scalable software architecture for Rich-Client based User Interfaces. It is primarily based on the important architecture principle Separation of Concerns (SoC), the derived idea of Hierarchical Composition, the invented design pattern Model-View-Controller/Component-Tree (MVC/CT) and the existing concepts Presentation Model and Data Binding.

The Linguistic Analysis of Jokes

The Linguistic Analysis of Jokes

The Linguistic Analysis of Jokes

This book starts from three observations. First, the use of humour is a complex, puzzling, and idiosyncratically human form of behaviour (and hence is of scientific interest). Second, there is currently no theory of how humour works. Third, one useful step towards a theory of humour is to analyze humorous items in precise detail, in order to understand their mechanisms. The author begins by considering how to study jokes rigorously: the assumptions to make, the guidelines to follow and the pitfalls to avoid. A critique of other work on humour is also provided. This introduces some important concepts, and also demonstrates the lack of agreement about what a theory of humour should look like. The language devices used in various jokes, such as puns or humour based on misinterpretation, are analysed in detail. The central part of the book develops, and demonstrates, proposals for how best to analyze the workings of simple jokes. Finally, the author makes some general suggestions about the language devices that seem to be central to the construction of jokes. The Linguistic Analysis of Jokes will be invaluable for researchers and advanced students of humour research, linguistics and cognitive science.

Simulation And The User Interface

Simulation And The User Interface

Simulation And The User Interface

From a May 1989 conference in Brighton, England, 18 papers address the utility and problems of simulation techniques in developing human- computer interfaces. Many of the themes also have application to other human-machine work systems. The sections, each with an overview, cover general issues, such as extrapolating from one task to another and operational evaluation; embedded simulations; discrete dialogue computing systems; and continuous dynamic control systems. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

User Interface Management and Design

User Interface Management and Design

User Interface Management and Design

This volume is a record of the Workshop on User Interface Management Systems and Environments held at INESC, Lisbon, Portugal, between 4 and 6 June 1990. The main impetus for the workshop came from the Graphics and Interaction in ESPRIT Technical Interest Group of the European Community ESPRIT Programme. The Graphics and Interac tion in ESPRIT Technical Interest Group arose from a meeting of researchers held in Brussels in May 1988, which identified a number of technical areas of common interest across a significant number of ESPRIT I and ESPRIT II projects. It was recognized that there was a need to share information on such activities between projects, to disseminate results from the projects to the world at large, and for projects to be aware of related activities elsewhere in the world. The need for a Technical Interest Group was confirmed at a meeting held during ESPRIT Technical Week in November 1989, attended by over 50 representatives from ESPRIT projects and the Commission of the European Communities. Information exchange sessions were organized during the EUROGRAPHICS '89 confer ence, with the intention of disseminating information from ESPRIT projects to the wider research and development community, both in Europe and beyond.

Search User Interface Design

Search User Interface Design

Search User Interface Design

Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who design effective algorithms to retrieve results from them. While it would be easy for one community to reject another for their limited ability to design a good SUI, the truth is that they all can, and they all have made valuable contributions. Fundamentally, therefore, we must accept that designing a great SUI means leveraging the knowledge and skills from all of these communities. The aim of this book is to at least acknowledge, if not integrate, all of these perspectives to bring the reader into a multidisciplinary mindset for how we should think about SUI design. Further, this book aims to provide the reader with a framework for thinking about how different innovations each contribute to the overall design of a SUI. With this framework and a multidisciplinary perspective in hand, the book then continues by reviewing: early, successful, established, and experimental concepts for SUI design. The book then concludes by discussing how we can analyse and evaluate the on-going developments in SUI design, as this multidisciplinary area of research moves forwards. Finally, in reviewing these many SUIs and SUI features, the book finishes by extracting a series of 20 SUI design recommendations that are listed in the conclusions. Table of Contents: Introduction / Searcher-Computer Interaction / Early Search User Interfaces / Modern Search User Interfaces / Experimental Search User Interfaces / Evaluating Search User Interfaces / Conclusions

Professional SAS User Interfaces

Professional SAS User Interfaces

Professional SAS User Interfaces

This is the only comprehensive guide to creating SAS user interfaces for the industry's most popular graphical platforms. Shows readers how to design and program easy-to-use interfaces for a variety of command line, windowing, macro language, and software development environments.

An Architecture for Distributed User Interfaces

An Architecture for Distributed User Interfaces

An Architecture for Distributed User Interfaces

Abstract: "Computing systems have changed rapidly since the first graphical user interfaces were developed. Hardware has become faster and software architectures have become more flexible and more open; a modern computing system consists of many communicating machines rather than a central host. Understanding of human-computer interaction has also become more sophisticated and places new demands on interactive software; these include, in particular, support for multi-user applications, continuous media, and 'ubiquitous' computing. The layer which binds user requirements and computing systems together, the user interface, has not changed as quickly; few user interface architectures can easily support the new requirements placed on them and few take advantage of the facilities offered by advanced computing systems. Experiences of implementing systems with unusual user interfaces have shown that current window system models are only a special case of possible user interface architectures. These window systems are too strongly tied to assumptions about how users and computers interact to provide a suitable platform for further evolution. Users and application builders may reasonably expect to be able to use multiple input and output devices as their needs arise. Experimental applications show that flexible user interface architectures, which can support multiple devices and users, can be built without excessive implementation and processing costs. This dissertation describes Gemma, a model for a new generation of interactive systems that are not confined to virtual terminals but allows collections of independent devices to be bound together for the task at hand. It provides mediated shared access to basic devices and higher-level virtual devices so that people can share computational facilities in the real world, rather than in a virtual world. An example window system shows how these features may be exploited to provide a flexible, collaborative and mobile interactive environment."