Approaches to the Study of Attic Vases

Approaches to the Study of Attic Vases

Approaches to the Study of Attic Vases

By showing how both interpretations have gained support in the more recent past, this work aims to provide a better understanding of the issues involved in the study of pottery today."--BOOK JACKET.

Papers on the Amasis Painter and His World

Papers on the Amasis Painter and His World

Papers on the Amasis Painter and His World

In connection with the Los Angeles opening of the exhibition The Amasis Painter and His World, a colloquium and symposium were held at the Getty Museum between February 28 and March 2, 1986. An international panel of scholars presented papers on various aspects of Greek vase-painting; these papers are collected as fully annotated essays in the companion volume to the exhibition catalogue. They include an essay by Dietrich von Bothmer concerning the connoisseurship of Greek vases, as well as one by Martin Robertson on the status of Attic vase-painting in the mid-sixth century; John Boardman’s discussion of Amasis and the implications of his name; Walter Burkert’s presentation on Homer in the second half of the sixth century; and a paper by Albert Henrichs on representations of Dionysos in sixth-century Attic vase-painting.

Antiquity

Antiquity

Antiquity

Includes section "Reviews."

Hesperia

Hesperia

Hesperia


Athens Etruria and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery

Athens  Etruria  and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery

Athens Etruria and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery

A lucrative trade in Athenian pottery flourished from the early sixth until the late fifth century B.C.E., finding an eager market in Etruria. Most studies of these painted vases focus on the artistry and worldview of the Greeks who made them, but Sheramy D. Bundrick shifts attention to their Etruscan customers, ancient trade networks, and archaeological contexts. Thousands of Greek painted vases have emerged from excavations of tombs, sanctuaries, and settlements throughout Etruria, from southern coastal centers to northern communities in the Po Valley. Using documented archaeological assemblages, especially from tombs in southern Etruria, Bundrick challenges the widely held assumption that Etruscans were hellenized through Greek imports. She marshals evidence to show that Etruscan consumers purposefully selected figured pottery that harmonized with their own local needs and customs, so much so that the vases are better described as etruscanized. Athenian ceramic workers, she contends, learned from traders which shapes and imagery sold best to the Etruscans and employed a variety of strategies to maximize artistry, output, and profit.

Hermathena

Hermathena

Hermathena


Papers on Special Techniques in Athenian Vases

Papers on Special Techniques in Athenian Vases

Papers on Special Techniques in Athenian Vases

The papers in this volume derive from the proceedings of an international symposium held at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa in June 2006 in connection with the exhibition The Colors of Clay: Special Techniques in Athenian Vases. The themes of the exhibition--vases executed in bilingual, coral-red gloss, outline, Kerch-style, white ground, and Six's techniques, as well as examples with added clay and gilding, and sculpted vases and additions--are the touchstones for the essays. More than twenty papers by renowned scholars are grouped under such general rubrics as Social Contexts for Athenian Vases in Special Techniques; Conservation, Analysis, and Experimentation; Artists, Workshops, and Production; and Markets and Exchange.

The Journal of Hellenic Studies

The Journal of Hellenic Studies

The Journal of Hellenic Studies

Vols. 1-8, 1880-87, plates published separately and numbered I-LXXXIII.