Pan Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia 1913 1974

Pan Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia  1913 1974

Pan Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia 1913 1974

The history of regional sporting events in 20th- century Asia yields insights into Western and Asian perspectives on what defines modern Asia, and can be read as a staging of power relations in Asia and between Asia and the West. The Far Eastern Championship Games began in 1913, and were succeeded after the Pacific War by the Asian Games. Missionary groups and colonial administrations viewed sporting success not only as a triumph of physical strength and endurance but also of moral education and social reform. Sporting competitions were to shape a "new Asian man" and later a "new Asian woman" by promoting internationalism, egalitarianism and economic progress, all serving to direct a “rising” Asia toward modernity. Over time, exactly what constituted a “rising” Asia underwent remarkable changes, ranging from the YMCA’s promotion of muscular Christianity, democratization, and the social gospel in the US-colonized Philippines to Iranian visions of recreating the Great Persian Empire. Based on a vast range of archival materials and spanning 60 years and 3 continents, Pan-Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia shows how pan-Asian sporting events helped shape anti-colonial sentiments, Asian nationalisms, and pan-Asian aspirations in places as diverse as Japan and Iran, and across the span of countries lying between them.

Current Issues in Asian Tourism Volume II

Current Issues in Asian Tourism  Volume II

Current Issues in Asian Tourism Volume II

Current Issues in Asian Tourism: Volume II draws together a collection of papers from Current Issues in Asian Tourism (CIAT). CIAT was launched by the editors of Current Issues in Tourism in response to the growing number of papers about tourism in Asia received by the journal and the increasing number of authors from Asian countries. This volume focuses on three aspects of Asian tourism. Firstly, the section on marketing, consumption and demand for Asian tourism includes papers on mega events, creative experiences, World Heritage Sites and pollution. Secondly, a group of papers focus on sustainable Asian tourism destinations including papers on investment, climate change, energy and local food. Finally, there are two chapters on Asian tourism research methods including the use of photography and qualitative methods. The papers in this book were originally published in Current Issues in Asian Tourism.

Asian Digital Libraries Looking Back 10 Years and Forging New Frontiers

Asian Digital Libraries  Looking Back 10 Years and Forging New Frontiers

Asian Digital Libraries Looking Back 10 Years and Forging New Frontiers

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries, ICADL 2007, held in Hanoi, Vietnam, in December 2007. The 41 revised full papers, 15 revised short papers, and extended abstracts of 10 poster papers presented together with three keynote and three invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 154 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections.

Mythic and Folk Elements in Modern Chinese Literature

Mythic and Folk Elements in Modern Chinese Literature

Mythic and Folk Elements in Modern Chinese Literature

A revisionist analysis employing an anthropological method to interpret folklore in the works of understudied modem Chinese writers.

The Asian American Encyclopedia

The Asian American Encyclopedia

The Asian American Encyclopedia

Explores the experience of Asian immigrants and the communities which they and their descendants have created in the United States, and offers information about the history, language and culture of Asian Americans' diverse countries of origin.

Asian Elements

Asian Elements

Asian Elements

With origins in countries as diverse as Japan, Bali, Thailand, and Sri Lanka, an Asian aesthetic has taken root in the West. Many of the world's leading designers such as John Pawson, Christian Liaigre, and Anouska Hempel have been drawn to it, sharing a desire to create interiors with a sense of harmony and balance and reflecting the East's use of natural materials. You'll find fresh, distinctive decorating inspiration for indoors and out in the contemporary home, drawing out the fascinating link between materials and design, as well as the cultural and spiritual dimensions that underpin Asian thought. Appropriate for today's softened minimalism, the interiors are unified by a less is more philosophy, in which the use of wood, ceramics, natural fibers, stone, and water are stunningly showcased.

Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture

Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture

Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture

The sheer diversity of the Asian American populace makes them an ambiguous racial category. Indeed, the 2010 U.S. Census lists twenty-four Asian-ethnic groups, lumping together under one heading people with dramatically different historical backgrounds and cultures. In Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture, Jennifer Ann Ho shines a light on the hybrid and indeterminate aspects of race, revealing ambiguity to be paramount to a more nuanced understanding both of race and of what it means to be Asian American. Exploring a variety of subjects and cultural artifacts, Ho reveals how Asian American subjects evince a deep racial ambiguity that unmoors the concept of race from any fixed or finite understanding. For example, the book examines the racial ambiguity of Japanese American nisei Yoshiko Nakamura deLeon, who during World War II underwent an abrupt transition from being an enemy alien to an assimilating American, via the Mixed Marriage Policy of 1942. It looks at the blogs of Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese Americans who were adopted as children by white American families and have conflicted feelings about their “honorary white” status. And it discusses Tiger Woods, the most famous mixed-race Asian American, whose description of himself as “Cablinasian”—reflecting his background as Black, Asian, Caucasian, and Native American—perfectly captures the ambiguity of racial classifications. Race is an abstraction that we treat as concrete, a construct that reflects only our desires, fears, and anxieties. Jennifer Ho demonstrates in Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture that seeing race as ambiguous puts us one step closer to a potential antidote to racism.