Attachment Theory in Clinical Work with Children

Attachment Theory in Clinical Work with Children

Attachment Theory in Clinical Work with Children

Attachment research has tremendous potential for helping clinicians understand what happens when parent–child bonds are disrupted, and what can be done to help. Yet there remains a large gap between theory and practice in this area. This book reviews what is known about attachment and translates it into practical guidelines for therapeutic work. Leading scientist-practitioners present innovative strategies for assessing and intervening in parent–child relationship problems; helping young children recover from maltreatment or trauma; and promoting healthy development in adoptive and foster families. Detailed case material in every chapter illustrates the applications of research-based concepts and tools in real-world clinical practice.

Attachment Based Clinical Work with Children and Adolescents

Attachment Based Clinical Work with Children and Adolescents

Attachment Based Clinical Work with Children and Adolescents

Attachment-Based Social Work with Children and Adolescents is a wide-ranging look at attachment theory and research, its application to youth populations, and its natural fit with the social work profession. This book covers the applicability of attachment theory to the profession’s various domains that include human behavior, practice, policy, research, and social work education. In particular, it addresses the broad spectrum of clinical social work, including practice in a variety of public and private settings and with a number of diverse populations. The book highlights the contribution of the social work profession to the development of attachment theory and research.

Attachment Theory and Research in Clinical Work with Adults

Attachment Theory and Research in Clinical Work with Adults

Attachment Theory and Research in Clinical Work with Adults

Written with the practicing psychotherapist in mind, this invaluable book presents cutting-edge knowledge on adult attachment and explores the implications for day-to-day clinical practice. Leading experts illustrate how theory and research in this dynamic area can inform assessment, case formulation, and clinical decision making. The book puts such concepts as the secure base, mentalization, and attachment styles in a new light by focusing on their utility for understanding the therapeutic relationship and processes of change. It offers recommendations for incorporating attachment ideas and tools into specific treatment approaches, with separate chapters on psychoanalytic, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioral, and emotionally focused therapies.

Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health

Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health

Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health

In the fifty years since its inception, John Bowlby’s attachment theory has been powerfully influential on developmental psychology and, more recently, mental health. Bringing together the experience of a diverse range of mental health practitioners and researchers who routinely use attachment theory in their own work, Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health provides a guide to using attachment theory in everyday practice. Adam N. Danquah and Katherine Berry present a wide-ranging and practical approach to the topic which includes studies on clinical practice, the provision of mental health services and accommodating intercultural perspectives. Section One covers the basics of attachment theory and practice. Section Two presents clinical problems and presentations including, among others, the treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, psychosis, personality disorder and eating disorders. Section Three addresses the needs of specific populations, discussing the influence of sociocultural factors like gender, ethnicity and age. Finally, Section Four examines the organisation and the practitioner, including using the theory to organise services and how individual therapists can integrate their own attachment histories into their approach. Including the most up-to-date theories and practice in the field, Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health is ideal for psychologists and psychological therapists, counsellors, psychiatrists, occupational therapists, social workers and mental health service managers and commissioners.

Integrating Behaviorism and Attachment Theory in Parent Coaching

Integrating Behaviorism and Attachment Theory in Parent Coaching

Integrating Behaviorism and Attachment Theory in Parent Coaching

This practical guide provides a robust positive-parenting framework for professionals coaching parents of infants, toddlers, and primary school children. The first half of the book explains behaviorist and attachment theories of parenting, comparing, contrasting, and synthesizing them into an effective, research-informed approach to practice. The second half shows these guidelines in action, using play therapy as a means to improve disruptive child behaviors, correct harsh parenting practices, and address root causes of adversarial parent-child relationships. Throughout these chapters, vivid composite cases demonstrate not only common parent-child impasses but also therapist empathy, flexibility, and self-awareness. This innovative text: Makes a rigorous case for a combined behavioral/attachment approach to parent coaching. Reviews current data on behavioral and attachment-based parenting interventions. Details the use of an attachment-informed approach to providing behavioral interventions such as Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Helping the Noncompliant Child. Illustrates how parent coaching can be tailored to match different patterns of attachment. Includes tools for evaluating coaching sessions. Integrating Behaviorism and Attachment Theory in Parent Coaching is an essential guide for professionals, graduate students, and researchers in clinical, child and school psychology, social work, pediatrics, mental health counseling, and nursing.

Attachment in Intellectual and Developmental Disability

Attachment in Intellectual and Developmental Disability

Attachment in Intellectual and Developmental Disability

"This new title in the Wiley Series in Clinical Psychology is the first to explore the role of attachment theory in understanding and helping children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD)"--

Child Psychotherapy

Child Psychotherapy

Child Psychotherapy

All too often children are diagnosed and medicated without the consideration that their symptoms may actually be a healthy response to stressful life events. This integrative guide for mental health practitioners who work with children underscores the importance of considering the etiology of a child's symptoms within a developmental framework before making a diagnosis. Providing advanced training and skills for working with children, the book guides the therapist, step-by-step, through assessment, case conceptualization, and treatment with a focus on the tenets of child development and a consideration of the impact of distressing life events. The book first addresses child development and the evolution of child psychotherapy from the perspectives of numerous disciplines, including recent findings in neurodevelopmental trauma and neurobiology. It discusses assessment measures, the impact of divorce and the forensic/legal environment on clinical practice, recommendations for HIPAA compliance, evidence-based best practices for treating children, and the requirements for an integrated treatment approach. Woven throughout are indications for case conceptualization including consideration of a child's complete environment. Key Features: Provides an integrative approach to child psychotherapy from the perspective of healthy development Offers an alternative to the medical model Discusses key theories of child development and psychotherapy Integrates a multimodal approach that considers a child's daily environment Includes a template for organizing and implementing a successful practice Features an instructorís manual and course syllabus

Clinical Work with Traumatized Young Children

Clinical Work with Traumatized Young Children

Clinical Work with Traumatized Young Children

Presenting crucial knowledge and state-of-the-art treatment approaches for working with young children affected by trauma, this book is an essential resource for mental health professionals and child welfare advocates. Readers gain an understanding of how trauma affects the developing brain, the impact on attachment processes, and how to provide effective help to young children and their families from diverse backgrounds. Top experts in the field cover key evidence-based treatments -- including child -- parent psychotherapy, attachment-based treatments, and relational interventions -- as well as interventions in pediatric, legal, and community settings. Special sections give in-depth attention to deployment-related trauma in military families and the needs of children of substance-abusing parents.

The Little Book of Attachment Theory to Practice in Child Mental Health with Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy

The Little Book of Attachment  Theory to Practice in Child Mental Health with Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy

The Little Book of Attachment Theory to Practice in Child Mental Health with Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy

A practical guide to implementing the rich theory of attachment for treating mental health challenges in children. This book both explains and illustrates how the practice of child mental health professionals can be enhanced, whatever their treatment approach, to encourage engagement, resilience, and development in children with mental health problems. Alongside practical recommendations, Daniel Hughes and Ben Gurney-Smith use dialogue from clinical work to illustrate applications of these principles from Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy as well as other attachment-based practices with parents and children. This “little book” will demystify how attachment theory—one of today’s most in-demand approaches—can actually be brought into clinical work. Topics include regulating emotional states; repairing ongoing relationships; establishing an attachment-based therapeutic relationship; accepting a child’s inner life; assessing the caregiver’s need for safety, regulation, and reflection; the importance of nonverbal and verbal conversations in facilitating secure attachment; and strengthening the mind of the child.

The Attachment Connection

The Attachment Connection

The Attachment Connection

Looks at parent-child attachment during the first five years of a child's development and discusses ways parents can foster secure attachment, promote healthy social skills, and regulate a child's emotions.