Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

China shares borders with 20 other countries. Each of these neighbors has its own national interests, and in some cases, these include territorial and maritime jurisdictional claims in places that China also claims. Most of these 20 countries have had a history of border conflicts with China; some of them never amicably settled. This book brings together some of the foremost historians, geographers, political scientists, and legal scholars on modern Asia to examine each of China's twenty land or sea borders.

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

China shares borders with 20 other countries. Each of these neighbors has its own national interests, and in some cases, these include territorial and maritime jurisdictional claims in places that China also claims. Most of these 20 countries have had a history of border conflicts with China; some of them never amicably settled. This book brings together some of the foremost historians, geographers, political scientists, and legal scholars on modern Asia to examine each of China's twenty land or sea borders.

Beijing Review

Beijing Review

Beijing Review


Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

Beijing s Power and China s Borders

China shares borders with 20 other countries. Each of these neighbors has its own national interests, and in some cases, these include territorial and maritime jurisdictional claims in places that China also claims. Most of these 20 countries have had a history of border conflicts with China; some of them never amicably settled. This book brings together some of the foremost historians, geographers, political scientists, and legal scholars on modern Asia to examine each of China's twenty land or sea borders.

China s Coming War with Asia

China s Coming War with Asia

China s Coming War with Asia

China?s ambition is to rise peacefully. Avoiding fierce conflicts with its Asian neighbors is essential to this goal. Jonathan Holslag makes a brilliant case for the geopolitical dilemma facing the rising China, and his argument that China will likely enter into major conflict with Asia is compelling and thoughtful. Both Chinese experts and decision-makers will find this book illuminating reading. Asia is set for another great power war. As China?s influence spreads beyond its territorial borders and its global aspirations gain momentum, so tensions with its neighbors are reaching breaking point. In this clear-sighted book, Jonathan Holslag debunks the myth of China?s peaceful rise, arguing instead that China?s policy of shrewd intransigence towards other Asian countries will inevitably result in serious conflict. China?s ambitions are not malicious. But what China wants ? namely to maximize its security and prosperity ? will lead to a huge power imbalance, where China towers above her neighbors, impels them into unequal partnerships, and is increasingly able to seize disputed territory. At present, China?s focused and uncompromising pursuit of its own interests is bearing fruit. Many of China?s neighbors are still too weak to counter Beijing?s influence, and China has ably exploited divisions between them to divide and rule. But several regional powers are now joining forces to stop China. With the PRC unlikely to back down and nationalism riding high, China?s coming war with Asia is already in the making.

South

South

South


Asia After the miracle

Asia After the  miracle

Asia After the miracle

The Asian economic "meltdown" that began in 1997 has demonstrated the urgent need for a post-cold war reappraisal of U.S. policy priorities in this critical region.American policy rests on the premise that the United States does not have to choose between economic and security priorities in Asia, because the American military presence is valued by regional powers in its own right. But is this premise justified?This timely book presents mini-debates on the key issues facing the United States in Asia, together with the recommendations of an Economic Strategy Institute Study Group composed of leading scholars, businessmen, diplomats, and military leaders with Asian experience. Among the wide-ranging recommendations are controversial proposals for a gradual disengagement of U.S. combat forces from Japan and Korea. The sixteen specialists who debate U.S. policy options in background papers prepared for the Study Group present conflicting perspectives on U.S. interests in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and South Asia.In a policy-challenging Overview, editors Selig S. Harrison and Clyde V. Prestowitz, Jr., focus on the impact of the cold war on U.S. economic relations with Asia today, and on the diminishing need for the forward deployment of U.S. forces resulting from improvements in U.S. airlift and sealift capabilities.The contributors are Doug Bandow, Barry Bosworth, Ted Galen Carpenter, James Clad, Rear Adm. Eugene Carroll, Jr., Charles W. Freeman, Jr., Chalmers Johnson, Geoffrey Kemp, Paul H. Kreisberg, Nicholas R. Lardy, Martin L. Lasater, Mike Masato Mochizuki, William J. Taylor, Ezra Vogel, Allen S. Whiting, and Jeffrey Winters.Selig S. Harrison is a senior scholar of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a fellow of The Century Foundation. His many books on U.S. relations with Asia include The Widening Gulf: Asian Nationalism and U.S. Policy. Clyde V. Prestowitz, Jr., is president of the Economic Strategy Institute and former counselor to the Secretary of Commerce. He is the author of Trading Places: How We Allowed Japan to Take the Lead.