Bloody Promenade

Bloody Promenade

Bloody Promenade

On 5 and 6 May 1864, the Union and Confederate armies met near an unfinished railroad in central Virginia, with Lee outmanned and outgunned, hoping to force Grant to fight in the woods. The name of the battle—Wilderness—suggests the horror of combat at close quarters and an inability to see the whole field of engagement, even from a distance. Indeed, the battle is remembered for its brutality and ultimate futility for Lee: even with 26,000 casualties on both sides, the Wilderness only briefly stemmed Grant's advance. Stephen Cushman lives fifty miles south of this battlefield. A poet and professor of American literature, he wrote Bloody Promenade to confront the fractured legacy of a battle that haunts him through its very proximity to his everyday life. Cushman's personal narrative is not another history of the battle. "If this book is a history of anything," he writes, "it's the history of verbal and visual images of a single, particularly awful moment in the American Civil War." Reflecting on that moment can begin in the present, with the latest film or reenactment, but it leads Cushman back to materials from the past. Writing in an informal, first-person style, he traces his own fascination with the conflict to a single book, a pictorial history he read as a boy. His abiding interest and poetic sensibility yield a fresh perspective on the war's continuing grip on Americans—how it pervades our lives through films and songs; novels such as The Red Badge of Courage, The Killer Angels, and Cold Mountain; Whitman's poetry and Winslow Homer's painting; or the pull of the abstract idea of the triumph of freedom. With maps and a brief discussion of the Battle of the Wilderness for those not familiar with the landscape and actors, Bloody Promenade provides a personal tour of one of the most savage engagements of the Civil War, then offers a lively discussion of its aftermath.

The Promenade

The Promenade

The Promenade

The Promenade, as the name suggests is all about our journey. It encompasses the sorrows we suffer, the times we smile, the people we meet every day and moments when we genuinely pray. The book is a confluence of different phases we experience in our lives. The poetic narrative of The Promenade doesn't aim to preach but to mirror secrets hidden in the deepest corners of our hearts, which we refuse to talk about in open.

Not Even Past

Not Even Past

Not Even Past

A timely, evocative, and beautifully written book, Not Even Past is essential reading for anyone interested in the Civil War and its role in American history.

WALT WHITMAN Ultimate Collection 500 Works in Poetry Prose

WALT WHITMAN Ultimate Collection  500  Works in Poetry   Prose

WALT WHITMAN Ultimate Collection 500 Works in Poetry Prose

This meticulously edited Walt Whitman collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Table of Contents: Poetry: Leaves of Grass (The Original 1855 Edition): Song of Myself A Song for Occupations To Think of Time The Sleepers I Sing the Body Electric Faces Song of the Answerer Europe the 72d and 73d Years of These States A Boston Ballad There Was a Child Went Forth Who Learns My Lesson Complete Great Are the Myths Leaves of Grass (The Final Edition): Inscriptions Starting from Paumanok Song of Myself Children of Adam Calamus Salut au Monde! Song of the Open Road Crossing Brooklyn Ferry Song of the Answerer Our Old Feuillage A Song of Joys Song of the Broad-Axe Song of the Exposition Song of the Redwood-Tree A Song for Occupations A Song of the Rolling Earth Birds of Passage A Broadway Pageant Sea-Drift By the Roadside Drum-Taps Memories of President Lincoln By Blue Ontario's Shore Autumn Rivulets Proud Music of the Storm Passage to India Prayer of Columbus The Sleepers To Think of Time Whispers of Heavenly Death Thou Mother with Thy Equal Brood From Noon to Starry Night Songs of Parting Sands at Seventy Good-Bye My Fancy Other Poems Novels: Franklin Evans Life and Adventures of Jack Engle Short Stories: The Half-Breed Bervance; or, Father and Son The Tomb-Blossoms The Last of the Sacred Army The Child-Ghost Reuben's Last Wish A Legend of Life and Love The Angel of Tears The Death of Wind-Foot The Madman Eris; A Spirit Record My Boys and Girls The Fireman's Dream The Little Sleighers Shirval: A Tale of Jerusalem Richard Parker's Widow Some Fact-Romances The Shadow and the Light of a Young Man's Soul Other Works: Manly Health and Training Specimen Days Collect Notes Left Over Pieces in Early Youth November Boughs Good-Bye My Fancy Some Laggards Yet Letters: The Wound Dresser The Letters of Anne Gilchrist and Walt Whitman

Specimen Days

Specimen Days

Specimen Days


The Life of Walt Whitman in His Own Words

The Life of Walt Whitman in His Own Words

The Life of Walt Whitman in His Own Words

Specimen Days is a series of diary entries about Whitman's life, from his boyhood days at Rockaway Beach, to his nursing days in Washington D.C during the Civil War, and finally to his time in Camden New Jersey. His account of the Civil War Hospitals is painful to read, but his kindness and ministrations to the wounded soldiers (writing them letters home and giving them horehound candy) are really touching. He estimated that visited between 80,000 and 100,000 young men. My great grandfather was in one of those hospitals, so I like to think that Walt stopped by to give him some candy and talk. After the war, Whitman came down with an illness and was partially paralyzed. He moved to Camden and spent his afternoons outside in nature. He attributes his rebound in health to this time and wrote many essays about the outdoors and the nature around him.

Authenticated Report of the Controversial Discussion between the Rev John Cumming and Daniel French held in the British School Room Hammersmith during the months of April and May 1839 From the notes of C M Archer etc

Authenticated Report of the Controversial Discussion between the Rev  John Cumming     and Daniel French     held in the British School Room  Hammersmith  during the months of April and May  1839  From the notes of C  M  Archer  etc

Authenticated Report of the Controversial Discussion between the Rev John Cumming and Daniel French held in the British School Room Hammersmith during the months of April and May 1839 From the notes of C M Archer etc