Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics Teaching Primary PE

Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics  Teaching Primary PE

Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics Teaching Primary PE

This book is closely tied to the new curriculum, with extracts from the curriculum itself and lesson plans and teaching ideas for every area. This book will equip non-specialists to confidently deliver engaging and well-informed lessons, that acount for the changes in the National Curriculum. This is a very practical and easy to apply programme for teaching PE either in your own classroom, or to implement across the school in the role of a co-ordinator.

Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics Teaching Primary Art and Design

Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics  Teaching Primary Art and Design

Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics Teaching Primary Art and Design

Art lessons offer children a new way to explore the world around them, and is another means by which they can express their ideas and process their thoughts. Bloomsbury Curriculum Basics: Teaching Primary Art and Design extends the National Curriculum requirements for art and design and provides a framework for teaching the five main skills for making art: drawing, painting, collage, printing and sculpture. Through carefully planned lesson frameworks and additional online resources, pupils can explore ideas and express their skills visually and verbally using subject-specific vocabulary. From resourcing and planning to teaching lessons, this all-in-one guide includes a full-colour plate section of famous artworks are cross-curricular reference links. It is ideal for you and your class to embrace the world of art and design.

Sociology of Educating

Sociology of Educating

Sociology of Educating

This new edition of an established textbook has been completely revised and updated to include recent issues in education and the latest references and suggestions for further reading.

What Pupils Say

What Pupils Say

What Pupils Say

The American river has a rich literary heritage, extending from Twain and Thoreau to the more recent journeys of John Graves and Jonathan Raban. Following in this great tradition, Franklin Burroughs chronicles a canoe voyage through the Carolinas, visiting his ancestral homeland and the people who inhabit the banks of the Waccamaw River. His account of this distinctive and rapidly disintegrating backwater reflects on life on and off the river, topography, and how this landscape echoes in the speech, memories, and circumstances of the people he encounters. Their lives provide a kind of living archaeology, and Burroughs's careful descriptions of their voices and habits open a door into history. As quiet and powerful as a river itself, this is a wise and beautifully written narrative of nature, people, and place by one of America's finest writers.