Boarding the Enterprise

Boarding the Enterprise

Boarding the Enterprise

Rereleased for Star Trek: The Original Series ’ 50th Anniversary, this in-depth analysis of the groundbreaking TV show features an updated introduction by Robert J. Sawyer and foreword by David Gerrold Trekkies and Trekkers alike will get starry-eyed over this eclectic mix of essays on the groundbreaking original Star Trek, one of the most culturally impactful TV shows of the last 50 years. Star Trek scriptwriters D. C. Fontana, David Gerrold, Norman Spinrad, and Howard Weinstein, science fiction writers including Allen Steele and Lawrence Watt-Evans, and various academics share behind-the-scenes anecdotes, discuss the show’s enduring appeal and influence, and examine some of the classic features of the series. Inside: Communications and media theorist Paul Levinson shows how the unprecedented success of the “seventy-nine jewels” in syndication changed the way we look at television forever. Star Trek writer D. C. Fontana remembers Gene Roddenberry and what it was like on the set and behind the scenes. Hugo Award–winning author Allen Steele explores the strong science fiction tradition that made the show so great. Cultural theorist Eric Greene details the show’s complex dialogue with the Vietnam War, highlighting the evolving stances on interventionist politics. Science fiction novelist DON Debrandt contends that the famously logical Spock isn’t quite as rational as Star Trek’s writers would have you believe. Scientist Robert A. Metzger proves that Scotty’s ability to lie makes him the most valuable member of the Enterprise crew. Fanfiction author Melissa Dickinson explains why we still feel compelled to write our own stories about Kirk, Spock, and the rest of the show’s memorable characters.

Black Enterprise

Black Enterprise

Black Enterprise

BLACK ENTERPRISE is the ultimate source for wealth creation for African American professionals, entrepreneurs and corporate executives. Every month, BLACK ENTERPRISE delivers timely, useful information on careers, small business and personal finance.

Small Boats and Daring Men

Small Boats and Daring Men

Small Boats and Daring Men

Two centuries before the daring exploits of Navy SEALs and Marine Raiders captured the public imagination, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps were already engaged in similarly perilous missions: raiding pirate camps, attacking enemy ships in the dark of night, and striking enemy facilities and resources on shore. Even John Paul Jones, father of the American navy, saw such irregular operations as critical to naval warfare. With Jones’s own experience as a starting point, Benjamin Armstrong sets out to take irregular naval warfare out of the shadow of the blue-water battles that dominate naval history. This book, the first historical study of its kind, makes a compelling case for raiding and irregular naval warfare as key elements in the story of American sea power. Beginning with the Continental Navy, Small Boats and Daring Men traces maritime missions through the wars of the early republic, from the coast of modern-day Libya to the rivers and inlets of the Chesapeake Bay. At the same time, Armstrong examines the era’s conflicts with nonstate enemies and threats to American peacetime interests along Pacific and Caribbean shores. Armstrong brings a uniquely informed perspective to his subject; and his work—with reference to original naval operational reports, sailors’ memoirs and diaries, and officers’ correspondence—is at once an exciting narrative of danger and combat at sea and a thoroughgoing analysis of how these events fit into concepts of American sea power. Offering a critical new look at the naval history of the Early American era, this book also raises fundamental questions for naval strategy in the twenty-first century.