Botanical Dietary Supplements

Botanical Dietary Supplements

Botanical Dietary Supplements

This volume provides reviews and details of the quality, safety and efficacy for some of the top-selling botanicals worldwide, including black cohosh, chamomile, comfrey, echinacea, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, kava, milk thistle, St John's wort and valerian. The work was written based on a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975-2000.;Each review includes a brief introduction, a section on quality including a definition of the crude drug, geographical distribution, and a listing of the major chemical constituents. The safety and efficacy sections summarize the medical uses, pharmacology, contraindications, warnings, precautions, adverse reactions, dose and dosage forms. The safety and efficacy sections were written for a busy health-care professional, and should enable one to ascertain which clinical uses are supported by clinical data, without having to read through all the pharmacology. Each chapter is fully referenced, enabling the reader to access further information when necessary.

Food Supplements Containing Botanicals Benefits Side Effects and Regulatory Aspects

Food Supplements Containing Botanicals  Benefits  Side Effects and Regulatory Aspects

Food Supplements Containing Botanicals Benefits Side Effects and Regulatory Aspects

This book provides a detailed analysis of the scientific, technical and regulatory aspects of plant food supplements designed for integration into the normal diet. Each contributor is involved in the European Plant LIBRA project, and the chapters summarize the results of the project while integrating further research on botanical supplements. With its focus on the epidemiology, risk assessment and evidence based approaches, this text presents a unique and comprehensive overview of botanical food supplements, from their production and chemistry to their side effects and regulatory aspects. Food Supplements Containing Botanicals: Benefits, Side Effects and Regulatory Aspects begins by outlining the general aspects of food supplements, before examining quality and risk assessment of food supplements with botanicals. The following chapters focus on sources, models and human studies which support health claims for these supplements, followed by chapters outlining side effects and potential causes for concern. The issue of increasing consumer expectations is also explored, with methods for meeting these expectations provided. In presenting this well-rounded and up-to-date collection of information on botanical supplements, this book is of great importance to food industry professionals working with botanical supplements.

Botanical Dietary Supplement Use Among Hispanic Latino Adults in the United States

Botanical Dietary Supplement Use Among Hispanic Latino Adults in the United States

Botanical Dietary Supplement Use Among Hispanic Latino Adults in the United States

Botanical supplement use is common in the United States, but its assessment is difficult among Hispanics/Latinos. This report documents the prevalence of botanical and non-vitamin non-mineral (NVNM) supplement use over a 30-day recall period in a sample of Hispanics/Latinos in the US as measured with two instruments. Dietary supplement assessment in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos included both a medication inventory and a nutrition-based dietary supplement interview, enabling a comparison of instruments across supplement categories. Additional supplements were captured from 24-hour dietary recalls. In addition, characteristics of botanical supplement users and their motivations for use were explored. The prevalence of dietary supplement use was substantially higher as measured in the dietary supplement interview as compared to the medication inventory: for total dietary supplements (40 vs. 26%, respectively), for NVNM supplements (25 vs. 13%), and botanicals (9 vs. 4%). Concordance between the two measures was fair-moderate by Cohen's Kappa (0.28 - 0.56). Estimates were sensitive to inclusion of botanical teas captured exclusively from 24-hour dietary recalls with increases in botanical supplement prevalence from 7 to 15% with their addition. After vitamins and minerals, the most prevalent supplement ingredients consumed were omega-3 fatty acids (9.7%), lutein (9.6%), and lycopene (10.5%). The prevalence of botanical supplement use varied across Hispanic/Latino background. Individuals with a self-reported Mexican, Central or South American background were more likely to use botanicals than individuals with a Dominican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican background. Other characteristics associated with botanical supplement use included age, income, and adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors. The association of education with botanical supplement use was stronger for more rather than less acculturated individuals. Motivations for supplement use included treatment/prevention of health conditions and appearance enhancements. Botanical use prevalence varied by Hispanic/Latino background, but characteristics of botanical supplement users across backgrounds were similar to those in the general US population as were the types of botanical supplements captured. Results suggest that drivers of commercial botanical supplement consumption may not differ between Hispanics/Latinos and the non-Hispanic white population and indicate an interest in self-improvement. Clearly needed are better dietary supplement assessment strategies and standardization of categorization.

Botanical Medicines

Botanical Medicines

Botanical Medicines

Lists and describes common herbal supplements, providing botanical information, traditional uses, clinical studies, and dosage and safety information.

Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin

Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin

Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin

Dietary supplements are estimated to be used regularly by almost 60% of the American population, and over 300 million people worldwide. An important and ever-growing portion of this market is in botanical supplements that are derived from natural plants. Natural, however, does not necessarily mean safe, and although plants can provide health-essential and health-improving nutrients they can also provide toxic compounds. While the use and sales of botanical supplements continues to expand rapidly, scientific understanding of the efficacy and safety of these products remains limited. The aim of Dietary Supplements of Plant Origin is to give both the general and specialized reader a comprehensive insight into the most recent findings in this interesting area of dietary supplementation. It is hoped that this book will shed a new light on this topic and impact positively upon the health of people in this new millennium.

120 Dietary Supplements

120 Dietary Supplements

120 Dietary Supplements

Convenient, In-Depth Laminated Information Guide This folding laminated guide is packed with detailed information on both sides. The rich design and colorful layout help readers find exactly what they're looking for quickly and efficiently. Sturdy board stock and lamination make this information guide extremely durable. Folded size 7-3/4" x 10-7/8".

Understanding Dietary Supplements

Understanding Dietary Supplements

Understanding Dietary Supplements

For many consumers, taking one or more dietary supple-ments is a natural addition to a healthy lifestyle. The decision to take a dietary supplement may be based on the recommendation of a doctor, a dietitian, or a friend. Television, newspapers, magazines, websites, and persuasive marketing materials in the pharmacy or supermarket may sway buyers. Information regarding dietary supplements abounds but can be misleading or contradictory. Understanding Dietary Supplements is a guide to making informed choices. Chapters provide Both an overview and detailed information about key supplements Coverage of a broad spectrum of vitamins and minerals, herbs and botanicals, drugs, and other options Jargon-free explanations of how each supplement can work on the body Safety concerns about interactions and misuse Regulations imposed on the industry and recent trends in the industry's development A glossary and listings of outside resources Included here, the full text of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994--the model for the FDA's regulation of dietary supplements--affords guidance to deciphering labels and determining value. Understanding Dietary Supplements is an easy-to-use guide to a much demanded but often misunderstood group of products. Jenna Hollenstein is clinical editor at the Pri-Med Institute of M-C Communications in Boston, Massachusetts. Her work has been published in Nutrition Reviews, Nutrition in Clinical Care, ILSI News, Pri-Med in Practice, and Pri-Med Online.

Examining the Science Behind Nutraceuticals

Examining the Science Behind Nutraceuticals

Examining the Science Behind Nutraceuticals

Over half of the adult population in the U.S. includes some sort of dietary supplement in their diet. This book provides the reader with a better understanding of the science and quality issues of dietary supplements. It explains terms regarding supplements, regulatory implications and standards of botanical extracts, and provides background on the supplement industry and pharmacoeconomics of supplements. It also identifies the health benefits and risks.