Building Digital Libraries

Building Digital Libraries

Building Digital Libraries

Demonstrates how resources are created, distributed and accessed, and how librarians can keep up with the latest technologies for successfully completing these tasks.

Building Digital Libraries Second Edition

Building Digital Libraries  Second Edition

Building Digital Libraries Second Edition

Whether you’re embarking on the challenge of building a digital collection from scratch, or simply need to understand the conceptual and technical challenges of constructing a digital library, this top-to-bottom resource is the ideal guidebook to keep at your side, especially in this thoroughly updated and reworked edition. Demonstrating how resources are created, distributed, and accessed, and how librarians can keep up with the latest technologies for successfully completing these tasks, its chapters walk you step-by-step through every stage. Demystifying core technologies and workflows, this book comprehensively covers needs assessment and planning for a digital repository;choosing a platform;acquiring, processing, classifying, and describing digital content;storing and managing resources in a digital repository;digital preservation;technologies and standards useful to digital repositories, including XML, the Portland Common Data Model, metadata schema such as Dublin Core, scripting using JSON and REST, linked open data, and automated metadata assignment;sharing data and metadata;understanding information-access issues, including digital rights management; andanalyzing repository use, planning for the future, migrating to new platforms, and accommodating new types of data. This book will thoroughly orient LIS students and others new to the world of digital libraries, and also ensure that current professionals have the knowledge and guidance necessary to construct a digital repository from its inception.

How to Build a Digital Library

How to Build a Digital Library

How to Build a Digital Library

How to Build a Digital Library reviews knowledge and tools to construct and maintain a digital library, regardless of the size or purpose. A resource for individuals, agencies, and institutions wishing to put this powerful tool to work in their burgeoning information treasuries. The Second Edition reflects developments in the field as well as in the Greenstone Digital Library open source software. In Part I, the authors have added an entire new chapter on user groups, user support, collaborative browsing, user contributions, and so on. There is also new material on content-based queries, map-based queries, cross-media queries. There is an increased emphasis placed on multimedia by adding a "digitizing" section to each major media type. A new chapter has also been added on "internationalization," which will address Unicode standards, multi-language interfaces and collections, and issues with non-European languages (Chinese, Hindi, etc.). Part II, the software tools section, has been completely rewritten to reflect the new developments in Greenstone Digital Library Software, an internationally popular open source software tool with a comprehensive graphical facility for creating and maintaining digital libraries. Outlines the history of libraries on both traditional and digital Written for both technical and non-technical audiences and covers the entire spectrum of media, including text, images, audio, video, and related XML standards Web-enhanced with software documentation, color illustrations, full-text index, source code, and more

Building Digital Archives Descriptions and Displays

Building Digital Archives  Descriptions  and Displays

Building Digital Archives Descriptions and Displays

"Noted archivist and library educator Frederick Stielow provides a comprehensive guide to efficiently adding content to the Web - and to creating Web-based descriptions and finding aids that will draw surfers to the library's, museum's, or other repository's Web site that houses them. All major digital approaches and languages - SGML, XML, and EAD (Encoded Archival Description) - as well as established descriptive standards such as the Dublin Core and Open URL are covered. Options for capturing images, sounds, and video resources and automated techniques for converting optical characters are explained step-by-step. As he did is his earlier critically acclaimed Creating Virtual Libraries, Stielow provides much more than just technical guidance: he also discusses how to integrate digital archives (and their associated records) with turnkey library automation systems and provides a thorough discussion of policies regarding what to digitize and post. Here is the ideal primer for project management and the perfect general guide for managing digital archives."--Publisher's description.

Building and Sustaining Digital Collections

Building and Sustaining Digital Collections

Building and Sustaining Digital Collections

In February 2001, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage (NINCH) convened a meeting to discuss how museums and libraries are building digital collections and what business models are available to sustain them. A group of museum and library senior executives met with business and legal experts, technologists, and funders to discuss the challenges that cultural institutions face when putting collections online and to identify some models for sustainability that support the core missions and do not conflict with the internal cultures of nonprofit entities. Speakers were asked to outline the elements of their business models, describe how they were developed, and predict their prospects for the future. Six approaches are outlined, ranging from two enterprises that have been providing access to scholarly journals online for several years to new initiatives that are based on collaborations among institutions. This report summarizes the information shared by presenters, followed by the discussions that ensued among participants. Discussion of the presentations focused on the following four topics: business models, scalability, organizational impact, and sustainability. On the basis of the day's discussions, the group was asked to propose an agenda for action. In addressing the short- and long-term needs of museums and libraries, participants identified four distinct areas that deserve the greatest attention: elements of a sound business plan, elements needed to sustain digital efforts at all types of institutions, inter-institutional issues, and funding. These recommendations and next steps appear at the end of the report. An appendix includes a list of participants. (Contains 21 references.) (AEF)

Digital Libraries

Digital Libraries

Digital Libraries


Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives

Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives

Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives

Equally valuable for LIS students just learning about the digital landscape, information professionals taking their first steps to create digital content, and organizations who already have well-established digital credentials, Purcell’s book outlines methods applicable and scalable to many different types and sizes of libraries and archives.

Developing Sustainable Digital Libraries Socio Technical Perspectives

Developing Sustainable Digital Libraries  Socio Technical Perspectives

Developing Sustainable Digital Libraries Socio Technical Perspectives

"This book provides tools to complement an organization's burgeoning information treasuries, exploring new frontiers by looking at social and economic aspects of digital libraries and their sustainability"--Provided by publisher.

Semantic Digital Libraries

Semantic Digital Libraries

Semantic Digital Libraries

Libraries have always been an inspiration for the standards and technologies developed by semantic web activities. However, except for the Dublin Core specification, semantic web and social networking technologies have not been widely adopted and further developed by major digital library initiatives and projects. Yet semantic technologies offer a new level of flexibility, interoperability, and relationships for digital repositories. Kruk and McDaniel present semantic web-related aspects of current digital library activities, and introduce their functionality; they show examples ranging from general architectural descriptions to detailed usages of specific ontologies, and thus stimulate the awareness of researchers, engineers, and potential users of those technologies. Their presentation is completed by chapters on existing prototype systems such as JeromeDL, BRICKS, and Greenstone, as well as a look into the possible future of semantic digital libraries. This book is aimed at researchers and graduate students in areas like digital libraries, the semantic web, social networks, and information retrieval. This audience will benefit from detailed descriptions of both today’s possibilities and also the shortcomings of applying semantic web technologies to large digital repositories of often unstructured data.