But is it Art

But is it Art

But is it Art

This groundbreaking anthology documents the recent explosion of art that agitates for progressive social change. Leading art critics, historians, and journalists explore the provocative methods of activist artists who reject conventional art practices in favor of public sites and community participation.

But Is It Art An Introduction to Art Theory

But Is It Art   An Introduction to Art Theory

But Is It Art An Introduction to Art Theory

In today's art world many strange, even shocking, things qualify as art. In this book, Cynthia Freeland explains why innovation and controversy are valued in the arts, weaving together philosophy and art theory with many fascinating examples. She discusses blood, beauty, culture, money, museums, sex, and politics, clarifying contemporary and historical accounts of the nature, function, and interpretation of the arts. Freeland also propels us into the future by surveying cutting-edge web sites, along with the latest research on the brain's role in perceiving art. This clear, provocative book engages with the big debates surrounding our responses to art and is an invaluable introduction to anyone interested in thinking about art.

But is it Art

But is it Art

But is it Art

A work using Wittgenstein's concept of philosophy to argue against the possibility of theories that seek to define art. It claims that the problems about identification and evaluation of works of art is that these problems are not theoretical, but grow out of our artistic traditions and practice.

But Is It Art

But  Is It Art

But Is It Art


But Is It Art Set

But Is It Art  Set

But Is It Art Set

Graffiti has been found on monuments in ancient Egypt and ancient Greece. Body art is an important practice in cultures around the world, such as henna in India and tribal tattooing in Africa. This innovative series introduces these and several other kinds of creation that may be considered art today, including junk sculptures and performance art. The main content explains the concepts behind each, and fact boxes offer historical context and other perspectives. Full-color photographs engage readers with the topics they are considering while sidebars ask pertinent questions for readers to think about as they read. High-interest, unique topics attract readers. Funky, colorful layout reflects the creative content. Thoughtful questions asked in the text encourage critical-thinking skills. Age-appropriate content and high-interest subject matter that captivates readers' attention.

It s a Sensation But is it Art

It s a Sensation  But is it Art

It s a Sensation But is it Art

Supplement published in Time Out on "Sensation", exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, 18 September - 28 Decemeber 1997.

Robert Crumb

Robert Crumb

Robert Crumb

Essay by Alfred M. Fischer.

Big Yes But is it Art

Big Yes  But is it Art

Big Yes But is it Art

Anne questions the placement of the 'Big Miner' and wonders how local artists will have an opportunity to contribute to the Eureka celebrations.

But is it Garbage

But is it Garbage

But is it Garbage

Trash has been blowing across the rock'n'roll landscape since the first amplified guitar riff tore through American mass culture. Throwaway tunes, wasted fans, crappy reviews, junk bins of remaindered albums: much of rock's quintessence is handily conveyed in terms of disposability and impermanence. Steven L. Hamelman sums up these rubbishy affinities as rock's "trash trope." Trash is an obvious physical presence on the rock scene -- think of Woodstock's littered pastures or the many hotel rooms redecorated by the Who. More intriguingly, Hamelman says, trash is the catalyst for a powerful mode of rock composition and criticism. It is, for instance, both cause and effect when performers like the Ramones or Beck at once critique junk culture and revel in it. But Is It Garbage? spills over with challenging insights into how rock's creators, critics, and consumers transform, and are transformed by, trash as a fact and a concept. In the music's preoccupation with its own trashiness readers will perceive a wellspring of rock innovation and inspiration -- one largely overlooked and little understood until now.