C S Lewis in a Time of War

C S  Lewis in a Time of War

C S Lewis in a Time of War

C. S. Lewis is universally recognized as one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century. A noted scholar, Lewis was able to reach a vast popular audience during his lifetime and continues to attract thousands of new readers every year. But how did Lewis first become a popular public figure? During the most desperate years of World War II, Lewis was asked by the British Broadcasting Corporation's recently created Home Service to give radio addresses on Christianity to a nation shaken by war. The choice was controversial. At first dismissed by critics as a layman who was unqualified to tackle such weighty issues, Lewis proved to be enormously persuasive. These radio talks were eventually published as Mere Christianity, which now ranks as one of the great classics of religious literature. This rich chapter in Lewis's life, which deals with his love-hate relationship with the "new" medium of broadcasting, has received little attention from biographers and commentators. Yet it was Lewis's work on the radio that made him a household name. By combining narrative skill and adroitly quoting from correspondence, Phillips captures Lewis's reservations, vexations, achievements, and, finally, his enormous success. C. S. Lewis in a Time of War is a fascinating look at how these talks were created and the enthusiastic response they generated at a time when bombing in London caused many radio stations to be evacuated. This book reveals a rich, previously untapped vein of Lewis's life and work that will intrigue his millions of fans.

C S Lewis in a Time of War

C S  Lewis in a Time of War

C S Lewis in a Time of War

BBC journalist Justin Phillips explores the fascinating story of the radio broadcasts that evolved into Lewis's seminal work, Mere Christianity, and the enthusiastic response they evoked in London during World War II as German bombs fell on the city.

C S Lewis Remembered

C  S  Lewis Remembered

C S Lewis Remembered

What was it like to have C. S. Lewis as a teacher? Most people know C. S. Lewis through his writings, but in his lifetime he was first and foremost a teacher. Now those who were influenced by what they learned from his teaching offer a unique view of one of the most influential Christian writers of all time. What was it like to study under C. S. Lewis when he taught at Oxford and Cambridge? How did his influence and teaching create a legacy that has influenced educators since? C. S. Lewis Remembered is a collection of interviews and essays that offer personal perspectives on Lewis the teacher and Lewis the man. These recollections portray him in all his humanity: both the irascibility and the brilliance, both the ferocity of his intellectual precision and the eagerness of his curiosity. Some of this book’s contributors chose to study with Lewis because of his Christian faith. Others admired him as a scholar but never shared Lewis’s interest in religion. Still others shared his “mere Christianity” but differed with him over his Protestantism. But all of them came into contact with Lewis when they were young adults, whether they were students, colleagues, or those who knew him informally as a teacher. Many of them followed in his footsteps and became educators as well. Former students such as W. Brown Patterson, Peter Milward, and Peter Bayley talk about what it was like to study under Lewis. A recent lecture by Walter Hooper and essays by such noted scholars as Barbara Reynolds offer additional insight on Lewis and his influence. Also included are pieces by Lewis’s godson, Lawrence Harwood; a transcript of an interview with Owen Barfield, a friend who knew Lewis from the time Lewis returned to Oxford after World War I and who played an important role in Lewis’s shift from atheism to belief in God; and a hitherto unpublished sketch of Lewis by Mary Shelley Neylan. In addition, an article that appeared in SF Horizons, a magazine for science fiction fans, offers a transcript of a taped conversation between C. S. Lewis, Kingsley Amis, and Brian Aldiss.

C S Lewis An Annotated Bibliography and Resource

C S  Lewis   An Annotated Bibliography and Resource

C S Lewis An Annotated Bibliography and Resource

This bibliography and resource consists of a chronological introduction to the development of Lewis's works, a copious bibliography and a guide to the study of Lewis, an introductory essay on Christology in Lewis, and a glossary for those unfamiliar with some of the background and terms to Lewis's understanding of revelation and the Christ. It will be an invaluable resource for all scholars of C. S. Lewis. The bibliography stands alone but it also serves to complement the three volumes of the series C. S. Lewis, Revelation, and the Christ.

War of the Fantasy Worlds

War of the Fantasy Worlds

War of the Fantasy Worlds

This investigation focuses on C.S. Lewis's and J.R.R. Tolkien's contrasting views of art and imagination, which are key to understanding and interpreting their fantasy works, providing insight into their goals, themes, and techniques, as well as an appreciation of the value and impact of their mythologies.

C S Lewis s Mere Christianity

C  S  Lewis s Mere Christianity

C S Lewis s Mere Christianity

The life and times of C. S. Lewis's modern spiritual classic Mere Christianity, C. S. Lewis's eloquent and winsome defense of the Christian faith, originated as a series of BBC radio talks broadcast during the dark days of World War Two. Here is the story of the extraordinary life and afterlife of this influential and much-beloved book. George Marsden describes how Lewis gradually went from being an atheist to a committed Anglican—famously converting to Christianity in 1931 after conversing into the night with his friends J. R. R. Tolkien and Hugh Dyson—and how Lewis delivered his wartime talks to a traumatized British nation in the midst of an all-out war for survival. Marsden recounts how versions of those talks were collected together in 1952 under the title Mere Christianity, and how the book went on to become one of the most widely read presentations of essential Christianity ever published, particularly among American evangelicals. He examines its role in the conversion experiences of such figures as Charles Colson, who read the book while facing arrest for his role in the Watergate scandal. Marsden explores its relationship with Lewis's Narnia books and other writings, and explains why Lewis's plainspoken case for Christianity continues to have its critics and ardent admirers to this day. With uncommon clarity and grace, Marsden provides invaluable new insights into this modern spiritual classic.

Collected Letters of C S Lewis Box Set

Collected Letters of C S  Lewis   Box Set

Collected Letters of C S Lewis Box Set

The life and mind of C. S. Lewis have fascinated those who have read his works. This collection of his personal letters reveals a unique intellectual journey. The first of a three-volume collection, this volume contains letters from Lewis's boyhood, his army days in World War I, and his early academic life at Oxford. Here we encounter the creative, imaginative seeds that gave birth to some of his most famous works. At age sixteen, Lewis begins writing to Arthur Greeves, a boy his age in Belfast who later becomes one of his most treasured friends. Their correspondence would continue over the next fifty years. In his letters to Arthur, Lewis admits that he has abandoned the Christian faith. "I believe in no religion," he says. "There is absolutely no proof for any of them." Shortly after arriving at Oxford, Lewis is called away to war. Quickly wounded, he returns to Oxford, writing home to describe his thoughts and feelings about the horrors of war as well as the early joys of publication and academic success. In 1929 Lewis writes to Arthur of a friend ship that was to greatly influence his life and writing. "I was up till 2:30 on Monday talking to the Anglo-Saxon professor Tolkien who came back with me to College ... and sat discoursing of the gods and giants & Asgard for three hours ..." Gradually, as Lewis spends time with Tolkien and other friends, he admits in his letters to a change of view on religion. In 1930 he writes, "Whereas once I would have said, 'Shall I adopt Christianity', I now wait to see whether it will adopt me ..." The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis, Volume I offers an inside perspective to Lewis's thinking during his formative years. Walter Hooper's insightful notes and biographical appendix of all the correspondents make this an irreplaceable reference for those curious about the life and work of one of the most creative minds of the modern era. C. S. Lewis was a prolific letter writer, and his personal correspondence reveals much of his private life, reflections, friendships, and the progress of his thought. This second of a three-volume collection contains the letters Lewis wrote after his conversion to Christianity, as he began a lifetime of serious writing. Lewis corresponded with many of the twentieth century's major literary figures, including J. R. R. Tolkien and Dorothy Sayers. Here we encounter a surge of letters in response to a new audience of laypeople who wrote to him after the great success of his BBC radio broadcasts during World War II -- talks that would ultimately become his masterwork, Mere Christianity. Volume II begins with C. S. Lewis writing his first major work of literary history, The Allegory of Love, which established him as a scholar with imaginative power. These letters trace his creative journey and recount his new circle of friends, "The Inklings," who meet regularly to share their writing. Tolkien reads aloud chapters of his unfinished The Lord of the Rings, while Lewis shares portions of his first novel, Out of the Silent Planet. Lewis's weekly letters to his brother, Warnie, away serving in the army during World War II, lead him to begin writing his first spiritual work, The Problem of Pain. After the serialization of The Screwtape Letters, the director of religious broadcasting at the BBC approached Lewis and the "Mere Christianity" talks were born. With his new broadcasting career, Lewis was inundated with letters from all over the world. His faithful, thoughtful responses to numerous questions reveal the clarity and wisdom of his theological and intellectual beliefs. Volume II includes Lewis's correspondence with great writers such as Owen Barfield, Arthur C. Clarke, Sheldon Vanauken, and Dom Bede Griffiths. The letters address many of Lewis's interests -- theology, literary criticism, poetry, fantasy, and children's stories -- as well as reveal his relation ships with close friends and family. But what is apparent throughout this volume is how this quiet bachelor professor in England touched the lives of many through an amazing discipline of personal correspondence. Walter Hooper's insightful notes and compre hensive biographical appendix of the correspon dents make this an irreplaceable reference for those curious about the life and work of one of the most creative minds of the modern era.

Weight of Glory

Weight of Glory

Weight of Glory

The classic Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis, the most important Christian writer of the 20th century, contains nine sermons delivered by Lewis during World War Two. The nine addresses in Weight of Glory offer guidance, inspiration, and a compassionate apologetic for the Christian faith during a time of great doubt.

C S Lewis s Mere Christianity

C  S  Lewis s Mere Christianity

C S Lewis s Mere Christianity

The life and times of C. S. Lewis's modern spiritual classic Mere Christianity, C. S. Lewis's eloquent defense of the Christian faith, originated as a series of BBC radio talks broadcast during the dark days of World War Two. Here is the story of the extraordinary life and afterlife of this influential and inspiring book. George Marsden describes how Lewis gradually went from being an atheist to a committed Anglican—famously converting to Christianity in 1931 after conversing into the night with his friends J. R. R. Tolkien and Hugh Dyson—and how his plainspoken case for Christianity went on to become one of the most beloved spiritual books of all time.

Collected Letters Volume Two Books Broadcasts and War 1931 1949

Collected Letters Volume Two  Books  Broadcasts and War  1931   1949

Collected Letters Volume Two Books Broadcasts and War 1931 1949

This three-volume collection brings together the best of C.S. Lewis’s letters – some published for the first time. This second volume covers the years from 1931–1949, charting Lewis’ emergence as a great Christian thinker and apologist.