Causes of War

Causes of War

Causes of War

What causes war? How can military conflicts best be prevented? A prominent political scientist here addresses these questions, offering ideas that will be widely debated. Stephen Van Evera frames five conditions that increase the risk of interstate war: false optimism about the likely outcome of a war, a first-strike advantage, fluctuation in the relative power of states, circumstances that allow nations to parlay one conquest into another, and circumstances that make conquest easy. According to Van Evera, all but one of these conditions—false optimism—rarely occur today, but policymakers often erroneously believe in their existence. He argues that these misperceptions are responsible for many modern wars, and explores both World Wars, the Korean War, and the 1967 Mideast War as test cases. Finally, he assesses the possibility of nuclear war by applying all five hypotheses to its potential onset. Van Evera's book demonstrates that ideas from the Realist paradigm can offer strong explanations for international conflict and valuable prescriptions for its control.

Causes of War

Causes of War

Causes of War

Written by leading scholars in the field, Causes of War provides the first comprehensive analysis of the leading theories relating to the origins of both interstate and civil wars. Utilizes historical examples to illustrate individual theories throughout Includes an analysis of theories of civil wars as well as interstate wars -- one of the only texts to do both Written by two former International Studies Association Presidents

An Introduction to the Causes of War

An Introduction to the Causes of War

An Introduction to the Causes of War

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES USING EXCEL® FOR SUCCESS, 2E, International Edition leads students to accounting mastery while increasing Excel® proficiency. Written with the modern business world in mind, this adaptation of the principles text--PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING, 24E--offers an innovative four-step system for students: (1) read the accounting concept and illustration, (2) follow the same concept using the Excel® Success Example, (3) practice using the "Try It" Tutorial, and (4) apply knowledge by completing the Excel® Success Problem.This text reinforces key accounting concepts through six basic Excel® formulas. Students build an Excel® portfolio to demonstrate basic competencies in accounting and Excel®. Each new copy of the book comes packaged with an access code that allows students to use the online Excel® "Try It" Tutorials. These tutorials guide students through the hands-on process of entering formulas and understanding how to Excel® for accounting. Excel® Success Special Activities at the end of the chapter require students to manipulate spreadsheets and save the files to demonstrate Excel® competency.

The Causes of War and the Spread of Peace

The Causes of War and the Spread of Peace

The Causes of War and the Spread of Peace

Why do humans go to war? Have we been waging war ever since we first existed as a species? Is a propensity to wage war part of what it is to be human, or more a result of the evolution of human society? And has there been a decline in war-making over time - or is this just a pious hope?Azar Gat here draws together insights from evolutionary theory, anthropology, history, historical sociology, and political science to address these fundamental questions about the history of our species - the answers to which also have big implications for our species' future survival.The book reveals that theories regarding the recent decline of war, such as the "democratic peace" and "capitalist peace", capture merely elements of a broader Modernization Peace that has been growing since the onset of the industrial age in the early 19th century.

War its Causes and Correlates

War  its Causes and Correlates

War its Causes and Correlates


What Causes War

What Causes War

What Causes War

Now in a thoroughly revised and updated edition, this classic text presents a comprehensive survey of the many alternative theories that attempt to explain the causes of interstate war. For each theory, Greg Cashman examines the arguments and counterarguments, considers the empirical evidence and counterevidence generated by social-science research, looks at historical applications of the theory, and discusses the theory’s implications for restraining international violence. Among the questions he explores are: Are humans aggressive by nature? Do individual differences among leaders matter? How might poor decision making procedures lead to war? Why do leaders engage in seemingly risky and irrational policies that end in war? Why do states with internal conflicts seem to become entangled in wars with their neighbors? What roles do nationalism and ethnicity play in international conflict? What kinds of countries are most likely to become involved in war? Why have certain pairs of countries been particularly war-prone over the centuries? Can strong states deter war? Can we find any patterns in the way that war breaks out? How do balances of power or changes in balances of power make war more likely? Do social scientists currently have an answer to the question of what causes war? Cashman examines theories of war at the individual, substate, nation-state, dyadic, and international systems level of analysis. Written in a clear and accessible style, this interdisciplinary text will be essential reading for all students of international relations.

The Causes of Wars and Other Essays

The Causes of Wars and Other Essays

The Causes of Wars and Other Essays

Public consciousness of the threat of nuclear war is rising steadily. Responses to the nuclear dilemma are conflicting and often confusing. Never have we been more in need of information and perspective, for if we wish to avoid war we must understand it. Michael Howard offers an analysis of our present predicament by discussing those issues that cause war and make peace. His book includes an examination of nuclear strategy today, views of the past about the conduct of international relations, ethics, modes of defense, and studies of military thinkers and leaders. The Causes of Wars illuminates the interrelationship between men and ideas, between war and other social forces, and between our present situation and its roots in the past.

Causes of War 3rd Ed

Causes of War  3rd Ed

Causes of War 3rd Ed


On the Causes of War

On the Causes of War

On the Causes of War


The Causes of War

The Causes of War

The Causes of War

Wars often spring out of nowhere with little warning. One need only look at the recent troubles at the Lebanon-Israeli border for evidence of this claim. At other points in history, such as the run-up to the Second World War, wars seem all but foretold. How does one understand a phenomenon that, at times, seems so random, while at others so predictable? Is there an underlying "cause" of war and, if so, what is it? In this book, David Sobek argues that there is no single explanation for war: factors leading to war in one case may well lead to peace in another. Understanding the onset of war, he contends, requires a movement away from single theories towards one that embraces the multi-faceted causes of war. The characteristics of individual states, the strategic interaction of multiple states, and the broad structure of the international system all affect the risk of war. Throughout the book Sobek draws on a wide range of examples – from the rise of Japan in the 19th century to the emergence of Hamas in the 21st century – to show how both domestic and international politics push states to, or pull them from, the brink of armed conflict. While civil war and terrorism are often viewed as a from of violence distinct from interstate war, Sobek examines them as simply an extreme form of asymmetric warfare. From this perspective terrorism emerges as just another tactic used by actors engaged in armed conflict. The Causes of War will be essential reading for students of security and strategic studies as well as anyone seeking to understand the rise of violent conflict in the contemporary world.