Christ s Body in Corinth

Christ s Body in Corinth

Christ s Body in Corinth

* A timely discussion of a key Pauline theme and its value for the global church * Challenges a consensus regarding the "politics" of 1 Corinthians

Women Praying and Prophesying in Corinth

Women Praying and Prophesying in Corinth

Women Praying and Prophesying in Corinth

In First Corinthians, Paul makes two conflicting statements about women's speech: He crafts a difficult argument about whether men and women should cover their heads while praying or prophesying (11:2-16) and instructs women to be silent in the assembly (14:34-35). These two statements bracket an extended discussion about inspired modes of speech - prophecy and prayer in tongues. From these exegetical observations, Jill E. Marshall argues that gender is a central issue throughout 1 Corinthians 11-14 and the religious speaking practices that prompted Paul's response. She situates Paul's arguments about prayer and prophecy within their ancient Mediterranean cultural context, using literary and archaeological evidence, and examines the differences in how ancient writers described prophetic speech when voiced by a man or a woman.

Reimagining the Body of Christ in Paul s Letters

Reimagining the Body of Christ in Paul   s Letters

Reimagining the Body of Christ in Paul s Letters

This book questions all familiar readings of the body of Christ in Paul's letters and helps readers rethink the context and the purpose of this phrase. Against the view that Paul's body of Christ metaphor mainly has to do with a metaphorical organism that emphasizes unity, Kim argues that the body of Christ has more to do with the embodiment of God's gospel through Christ. While Deutero-Pauline and pastoral letters use this body metaphor mainly as an organism, Paul's undisputed letters--in particular, 1 Corinthians and Romans--treat it differently, with a focus on Christlike embodiment. Reexamining the diverse use of the body of Christ in Paul's undisputed letters, this book argues that Paul's body of Christ metaphor has to do with the proclamation of God's gospel.

1st and 2nd Corinthians

1st and 2nd Corinthians

1st and 2nd Corinthians

The apostle Paul admonishes the Corinthian church to consider the value of Christ's redemption and realign their thinking with God's instructions.

One Body One Spirit

One Body  One Spirit

One Body One Spirit

Discover what unity in Christ means through the Larsens' dynamic studies. And then put it into practice in relationships with other believers.

Commentary on First Corinthians Commentary on the New Testament Book 7

Commentary on First Corinthians  Commentary on the New Testament Book  7

Commentary on First Corinthians Commentary on the New Testament Book 7

Delve Deeper into God's Word In this verse-by-verse commentary, Robert Gundry offers a fresh, literal translation and a reliable exposition of Scripture for today's readers. Gundry unpacks this first letter of Paul to the church in Corinth, addressing the pressing issues the church faces--issues many churches face today as well. Pastors, Sunday school teachers, small group leaders, and laypeople will welcome Gundry's nontechnical explanations and clarifications. And Bible students at all levels will appreciate his sparkling interpretations. This selection is from Gundry's Commentary on the New Testament.

1 Corinthians Teach the Text Commentary Series

1 Corinthians  Teach the Text Commentary Series

1 Corinthians Teach the Text Commentary Series

The Teach the Text Commentary Series utilizes the best of biblical scholarship to provide the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively. The carefully selected preaching units and focused commentary allow pastors to quickly grasp the big idea and key themes of each passage of Scripture. Each unit of the commentary includes the big idea and key themes of the passage and sections dedicated to understanding, teaching, and illustrating the text. In his commentary on 1 Corinthians, Preben Vang shows how Paul's experience with the church in Corinth is so remarkably applicable to the church in a postmodern Western context, expertly translating the issues of Paul's day into our contemporary situation.