U S Army Special Forces Language Visual Training Materials FRENCH Plus Web Based Program and Chapter Audio Downloads

U S  Army Special Forces Language Visual Training Materials   FRENCH   Plus Web Based Program and Chapter Audio Downloads

U S Army Special Forces Language Visual Training Materials FRENCH Plus Web Based Program and Chapter Audio Downloads

Now included at the end of the book is a link for a web-based program, PDFs and MP3 sound files for each chapter. Over 3,700 pages ... Developed by I Corps Foreign Language Training Center Fort Lewis, WA For the Special Operations Forces Language Office United States Special Operations Command LANGUAGE TRAINING The ability to speak a foreign language is a core unconventional warfare skill and is being incorporated throughout all phases of the qualification course. The students will receive their language assignment after the selection phase where they will receive a language starter kit that allows them to begin language training while waiting to return to Fort Bragg for Phase II. The 3rd Bn, 1st SWTG (A) is responsible for all language training at the USAJFKSWCS. The Special Operations Language Training (SOLT) is primarily a performance-oriented language course. Students are trained in one of ten core languages with enduring regional application and must show proficiency in speaking, listening and reading. A student receives language training throughout the Pipeline. In Phase IV, students attend an 8 or 14 week language blitz depending upon the language they are slotted in. The general purpose of the course is to provide each student with the ability to communicate in a foreign language. For successful completion of the course, the student must achieve at least a 1/1/1 or higher on the Defense Language Proficiency Test in two of the three graded areas; speaking, listening and reading. Table of Contents Introduction Introduction Lesson 1 People and Geography Lesson 2 Living and Working Lesson 3 Numbers, Dates, and Time Lesson 4 Daily Activities Lesson 5 Meeting the Family Lesson 6 Around Town Lesson 7 Shopping Lesson 8 Eating Out Lesson 9 Customs, and Courtesies in the Home Lesson 10 Around the House Lesson 11 Weather and Climate Lesson 12 Personal Appearance Lesson 13 Transportation Lesson 14 Travel Lesson 15 At School Lesson 16 Recreation and Leisure Lesson 17 Health and the Human Body Lesson 18 Political and International Topics in the News Lesson 19 The Military Lesson 20 Holidays and Traditions

The New Millennium Atlas of the United States Canada the World

The New Millennium Atlas of the United States  Canada   the World

The New Millennium Atlas of the United States Canada the World

Provides detailed maps and statistical information for countries, islands, Canadian provinces, and individual states within the United States.

The Smithsonian Institution African Mammal Project 1961 1972

The Smithsonian Institution African Mammal Project  1961 1972

The Smithsonian Institution African Mammal Project 1961 1972

Conceived and directed by Henry W. Setzer, the African Mammal Project (1961-1972) covered portions of 20 countries concentrated in the norther, western, and southern regions of Africa and generated over 63,000 specimens of mammals. The geographic foundation of this ambitious field program is documented as an annotated gazetteer that provides coordinate data for 785 cardinal collecting localities, collectors' names and dates of collection, general ecological descriptions, and mammalian genera obtained at each site. In georeferencing localities, emphasis was given to primary archival sources--original specimen labels, collectors' field journals, and contemporaneous field maps. Most localities surveyed fell within the Northern Savanna and Southern Savanna biotic zones. The Mediterranean, Sahara Desert, Guinea High Forest, and Southwest Arid zones were moderately sampled; the Southwest Cape and Afromontane zones were minimally represented. The principal inventory method applied by field teams involved multiple transect lines of snap traps, supplemented by hunting, roost searching, mist-netting, and specimen purchasing. Total collecting effort varied immensely among countries, from 13 days (Chad) to 770 days (South Africa), and the number of specimens obtained was strongly correlated; length of dedicated site inventory mostly ranged from 3 to 8 days of collecting effort per cardinal locality. The resulting 63,213 vouchers include examples of 15 orders, 47 families, and 208 genera of African mammals; Rodentia (705) and Chiroptera (20%) are most abundantly represented. The historical genesis of the African Mammal Project and its scientific goals as developed by H.W. Setzer are reviewed in the introduction to the gazetteer.

Index catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology

Index catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology

Index catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology

Supplements 1-14 have Authors sections only; supplements 15- include an additional section: Parasite-subject catalogue.