Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories

Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories

Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories

2019 Choice Outstanding Academic Title In Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories David V. Kaufman offers a stunning relational analysis of social, cultural, and linguistic change in the Lower Mississippi Valley from 500 to 1700. He charts how linguistic evidence aids the understanding of earlier cultural and social patterns, traces the diaspora of indigenous peoples, and uncovers instances of human migration. Historical linguistics establishes evidence of contact between indigenous peoples in the linguistic record where other disciplinary approaches have obscured these connections. The Mississippi Valley is the heartland of early North American civilizations, a rich and diversified center of transportation for every part of eastern North America and to Mesoamerica. The Lower Mississippi Valley region emerged as the home of the earliest mound-building societies in the Americas and was home to some of the most impressive kingdoms encountered by Spanish and French explorers. The languages of the region provide the key to the realities experienced by these indigenous peoples, their histories, and their relationships. Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories focuses on relationships that constitute what linguists call a sprachbund (language union), or language area. Kaufman illuminates and articulates these linguistic relationships through a skillful examination of archaeological and ethnohistorical data. Clues to Lower Mississippi Valley Histories examines the relationship between linguistics and archaeology to elucidate the early history of the Lower Mississippi Valley.

American Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley

American Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley

American Indians in the Lower Mississippi Valley

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Native peoples inhabiting the Lower Mississippi Valley confronted increasing domination by colonial powers, disastrous reductions in population, and threatened marginalization by a new cotton economy. Their strategies of resistance and adaptation to these changes are brought to light in this perceptive study. An introductory overview of the historiography of Native peoples in the early Southeast examines how the study of Native-colonial relations has changed over the last century. Usner reevaluates the Natchez Indians' ill-fated relations with the French, following with an insightful look at the cultural effects of Native population losses from disease and warfare during the eighteenth century. Drawing on his reconceptualization of the "middle ground" of Indian-colonial relations as a "frontier exchange economy", Usner next examines in detail the social and economic relations the Native peoples forged even in the face of colonial domination and demographic decline. He reveals how Natives adapted to the cotton economy, which displaced their familiar social and economic networks of interaction with outsiders. Finally, Usner offers an intriguing excursion into cultural criticism, assessing the effects of popular images of Natives from this region.

Conference on Southern Pre history

Conference on Southern Pre history

Conference on Southern Pre history


Clues from the Past

Clues from the Past

Clues from the Past

Surveys cultural time periods, antiquities, and archeological sites in Texas and discusses the preservation and study of such sites and the value of archeology in general.

Geomorphology

Geomorphology

Geomorphology

A systematic analysis of landforms of the late Cenzoic Era that fully covers the constructional processes of tectonism and volcanism and the erosional processes of weathering, flurial erosion, glaciers, winds, and waves. It explains each set of processes and the resulting landforms in a separate chapter to provide a comprehensive, nonmathematical overview of the subject. Coverage of rock weathering includes more discussion of soils, soil formation, and soils chronosequences, which tell about the evolution of the present landscape. A chapter on The Last Glacial-Interglacial Cycle,¿ stresses the intensity of change during and since the last ice age when human civilization has risen, and appeals to readers to understand change as a normal factor of life on Earth.