Colonial Presbyterianism

Colonial Presbyterianism

Colonial Presbyterianism

'Colonial Presbyterianism' is a collection of essays that tell the story of the Presbyterian Church during its formative years in America. The book brings together research from a broad group of scholars into an accessible format for laymen, clergy, and scholars. Through a survey of important personalities and events, the contributors offer a compelling narrative that will be of interest to Presbyterians and all persons interested in colonial America's religious experience. The clergy described in these essays made a lasting impact on their generation both within the church and in the emerging ethos of a new nation. The ecclesiastical issues that surfaced during this period have tended to be the perennial issues with which Presbyterians have been concerned ever since that time. Now at the three-hundredth anniversary of Presbyterian organization in America, 'Colonial Presbyterianism' is a timely reengagement with the old faith for a new day.

Scottish Presbyterianism and Settler Colonial Politics

Scottish Presbyterianism and Settler Colonial Politics

Scottish Presbyterianism and Settler Colonial Politics

This book offers a new interpretation of political reform in the settler colonies of Britain’s empire in the early nineteenth century. It examines the influence of Scottish Presbyterian dissenting churches and their political values. It re-evaluates five notorious Scottish reformers and unpacks the Presbyterian foundation to their political ideas: Thomas Pringle (1789-1834), a poet in Cape Town; Thomas McCulloch (1776-1843), an educator in Pictou; John Dunmore Lang (1799-1878), a church minister in Sydney; William Lyon Mackenzie (1795-1861), a rebel in Toronto; and Samuel McDonald Martin (1805?-1848), a journalist in Auckland. The book weaves the five migrants’ stories together for the first time and demonstrates how the campaigns they led came to be intertwined. The book will appeal to historians of Scotland, Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the British Empire and the Scottish diaspora.

The Presbyterian Story

The Presbyterian Story

The Presbyterian Story

Being Presbyterian involves multiple layers of identity and connection. As Christians, Presbyterians are "catholic," sharing the common heritage of ancient Christianity with all believers, of all times, in all places. Presbyterians are Protestant by conviction sharing the rich spiritual heritage of the sixteenth century and the unique contributions of the Reformed Tradition. Historically, Presbyterians are also part of the evangelical movement, embracing the legacy of the eighteenth-century revivals (awakenings) in America and Britain. Each of these historic layers is equally important to Presbyterian identity and this book will seek to underscore that reality.

Caterpillars and Newfangled Religion

Caterpillars and Newfangled Religion

Caterpillars and Newfangled Religion

Cornman, vice president and dean of the Undergraduate School at Moody Bible Institute, chronicles the conflict between anti-revivalist Presbyterians ("caterpillars") who sought to transfer Presbyterianism unaltered from Ireland and Scotland, and revivalists who wished to create a "newfangled" Presbyterianism to reach new groups of people in colonial America. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).