Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All provides cutting-edge but basic conservation science to a global readership. A series of authoritative chapters have been written by the top names in conservation biology with the principal aim of disseminating cutting-edge conservation knowledge as widely as possible.

Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All

Conservation Biology for All provides cutting-edge but basic conservation science to a global readership. A series of authoritative chapters have been written by the top names in conservation biology with the principal aim of disseminating cutting-edge conservation knowledge as widely as possible. Important topics such as balancing conversion and human needs, climate change, conservation planning, designing and analyzing conservation research, ecosystem services, endangered species management, extinctions, fire, habitat loss, and invasive species are covered. Numerous textboxes describing additional relevant material or case studies are also included. The global biodiversity crisis is now unstoppable; what can be saved in the developing world will require an educated constituency in both the developing and developed world. Habitat loss is particularly acute in developing countries, which is of special concern because it tends to be these locations where the greatest species diversity and richest centres of endemism are to be found. Sadly, developing world conservation scientists have found it difficult to access an authoritative textbook, which is particularly ironic since it is these countries where the potential benefits of knowledge application are greatest. There is now an urgent need to educate the next generation of scientists in developing countries, so that they are in a better position to protect their natural resources.

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

• • • John Harper • • • Nature conservation has changed from an idealistic philosophy to a serious technology. Ecology, the science that underpins the technol ogy of conservation, is still too immature to provide all the wisdom that it must. It is arguable that the desire to conserve nature will in itself force the discipline of ecology to identify fundamental prob lems in its scientific goals and methods. In return, ecologists may be able to offer some insights that make conservation more practicable (Harper 1987). The idea that nature (species or communities) is worth preserv ing rests on several fundamental arguments, particularly the argu ment of nostalgia and the argument of human benefit and need. Nostalgia, of course, is a powerful emotion. With some notable ex ceptions, there is usually a feeling of dismay at a change in the sta tus quo, whether it be the loss of a place in the country for walking or rambling, the loss of a painting or architectural monument, or that one will never again have the chance to see a particular species of bird or plant.

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

This book provides a thorough, up-to-date examination of conservation biology and the many supporting disciplines that comprise conservation science. In this, the Third Edition of the highly successful Conservation Biology: Foundations, Concepts, Applications, the authors address their interdisciplinary topic as it must now be practiced and perceived in the modern world. Beginning with a concise review of the history of conservation, the authors go on to explore the interplay of conservation with genetics, demography, habitat and landscape, aquatic environments, and ecosystem management, and the relationship of all these disciplines to ethics, economics, law, and policy. An entirely new chapter, The Anthropocene: Conservation in a Human-Dominated Nature, breaks new ground in its exploration of how conservation can be practiced in anthropogenic biomes, novel ecosystems, and urban habitats. The Third Edition includes the popular Points of Engagement discussion questions used in earlier editions, and adds a new feature: Information Boxes, which briefly recap specific case histories described in the text. A concluding chapter offers insight into how to become a conservation professional, in both traditional and non-traditional roles. The authors, Fred Van Dyke and Rachel Lamb, draw on their expertise as field biologists, wildlife managers, consultants to government and industry, and scholars of environmental law, policy, and advocacy, as well as their many years of effective teaching experience. Informed by practical knowledge and acquired skills, the authors have created a work of exceptional clarity and readability which encompasses both systemic foundations as well as contemporary developments in the field. Conservation Biology: Foundations, Concepts, Applications will be of invaluable benefit to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as to working conservation scientists and managers. This is an amazing resource for students, faculty, and practitioners both new and experienced to the field. Diane Debinski, PhD Unexcelled wisdom for living at home on Wonderland Earth, the planet with promise, destined for abundant life. Holmes Rolston, PhD Van Dyke and Lamb have maintained the original text’s emphasis on connecting classical ecological and environmental work with updated modern applications and lucid examples. But more importantly, the third edition contains much new material on the human side of conservation, including expanded treatments of policy, economics, and climate change. Tim Van Deelen, PhD Fred Van Dyke and Rachel Lamb break new ground in both the breadth and depth of their review and analysis of this crucially important and rapidly changing field. Any student or other reader wishing to have a comprehensive overview and understanding of the complexities of conservation biology need look no further – this book is your starting point! Simon N. Stuart, PhD Anyone who teaches, talks or writes and works on Conservation Biology, needs this latest edition of Conservation Biology (Foundations, Concepts, Applications, 3rd edition) by Fred Van Dyke and Rachel L. Lamb. This will be useful to both beginners and experts as well. The authors included almost all important issues in relation to conservation biology. This is really an outstanding book. Bidhan Chandra Das, Professor, Ecology Branch, Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Reflecting a new generation of conservation biologists' upper-division and graduate level conservation biology courses, as well as for individual reference, this book incorporates a number of new authors and additional chapters, covering all aspects of one of the most dynamic areas in the life sciences. Containing ten additional chapters, it includes such timely topics as ecosystem management and the economics of conservation.

Studyguide for Conservation Biology for All by Editor ISBN 9780199554249

Studyguide for Conservation Biology for All by  Editor   ISBN 9780199554249

Studyguide for Conservation Biology for All by Editor ISBN 9780199554249

Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Includes all testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides gives all of the outlines, highlights, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Only Cram101 is Textbook Specific. Accompanies: 9780199554249. This item is printed on demand.

Principles of Conservation Biology

Principles of Conservation Biology

Principles of Conservation Biology

Principles of Conservation Biology, Third Edition is a complete revision of the most comprehensive textbook on conservation biology. Written by leading experts in the field, it is intended for use in conservation biology courses at the advanced undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as by researchers and practitioners. It assumes a basic background in biology and ecology. The text introduces the major themes and concepts of the diverse and dynamic field of conservation biology. The biological and social underpinnings of conservation problems and potential solutions are interwoven throughout the text, which is divided into 4 sections: foundations of the field, threats to biodiversity, contexts for conservation, and practical applications of conservation biology in a real and complex world. Guest essays and case studies provide a diversity of perspectives and real-world examples that add insight and provoke discussion. The Third Edition features a wholly revised organization, emphasising both analyses of different categories of threat and approaches to conservation. Coverage has been expanded to emphasise both terrestrial and marine conservation issues, and efforts in the US and across the globe. The book is richly illustrated, and concludes with an extensive glossary of useful terms and a large bibliography that has proved a valuable reference for students and researchers.

Conservation of Tropical Birds

Conservation of Tropical Birds

Conservation of Tropical Birds

Conservation of Tropical Birds has been written by four conservation biologists whose expertise spans all the tropical regions of the world. It is the first book to cover all the major issues in tropical bird conservation. Current problems faced by tropical bird conservationists are summarised and potential solutions outlined based on the results of case studies. Birds are key indicators of ecosystem health, and such a well-studied group of organisms, that they provide an excellent lens through which to examine global conservation problems caused by phenomena such as climate change, declines in ecosystem services, habitat loss, fires, overexploitation, and invasive species. Therefore, the book also provides an engaging synopsis of the general issues in conservation and the problems faced by other wildlife. This book serves as an important resource and companion to all people interested in observing and conserving birds in the tropics and elsewhere.

Relict Species

Relict Species

Relict Species

Mankind has evolved both genetically and culturally to become a most successful and dominant species. But we are now so numerous and our technology is so p- erful that we are having major effects on the planet, its environment, and the b- sphere. For some years prophets have warned of the possible detrimental consequences of our activities, such as pollution, deforestation, and overfishing, and recently it has become clear that we are even changing the atmosphere (e. g. ozone, carbon dioxide). This is worrying since the planet’s life systems are involved and dependent on its functioning. Current climate change – global w arming – is one recognised consequence of this larger problem. To face this major challenge, we will need the research and advice of many disciplines – Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Biology, and Sociology – and particularly the commitment of wise politicians such as US Senator Al Gore. An important aspect of this global problem that has been researched for several decades is the loss of species and the impoverishment of our ecosystems, and hence their ability to sustain themselves, and more particularly us! Through evolutionary time new species have been generated and some have gone extinct. Such extinction and regeneration are moulded by changes in the earth’s crust, atmosphere, and resultant climate. Some extinctions have been massive, particularly those asso- ated with catastrophic meteoric impacts like the end of the Cretaceous Period 65Mya.

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology

Fred Van Dyke’s new textbook, Conservation Biology: Foundations, Concepts, Applications, 2nd Edition, represents a major new text for anyone interested in conservation. Drawing on his vast experience, Van Dyke’s organizational clarity and readable style make this book an invaluable resource for students in conservation around the globe. Presenting key information and well-selected examples, this student-friendly volume carefully integrates the science of conservation biology with its implications for ethics, law, policy and economics.