Democratic Education for Social Studies

Democratic Education for Social Studies

Democratic Education for Social Studies

In the first edition of this book published in 1988, Shirley Engle and I offered a broader and more democratic curriculum as an alternative to the persistent backtothebasics rhetoric of the ‘70s and ‘80s. This curriculum urged attention to democratic practices and curricula in the school if we wanted to improve the quality of citizen participation and strengthen this democracy. School practices during that period reflected a much lower priority for social studies. Fewer social studies offerings, fewer credits required for graduation and in many cases, the job descriptions of social studies curriculum coordinators were transformed by changing their roles to general curriculum consultants. The mentality that prevailed in the nation’s schools was “back to the basics” and the basics never included or even considered the importance of heightening the education of citizens. We certainly agree that citizens must be able to read, write and calculate but these abilities are not sufficient for effective citizenship in a democracy. This version of the original work appears at a time when young citizens, teachers and schools find themselves deluged by a proliferation of curriculum standards and concomitant mandatory testing. In the ‘90s, virtually all subject areas including United States history, geography, economic and civics developed curriculum standards, many funded by the federal government. Subsequently, the National Council for the Social Studies issued the Social Studies Curriculum Standards that received no federal support. Accountability, captured in the No Child Left Behind Act passed by Congress, has become a powerful, political imperative that has a substantial and disturbing influence on the curriculum, teaching and learning in the first decade of the 21st century.

Democratic Social Education

Democratic Social Education

Democratic Social Education

Using an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes the relationship between higher education, the economy and government in the development of a democratic and market economy society in emerging market countries.

Principles and Practices of Democracy in the Education of Social Studies Teachers

Principles and Practices of Democracy in the Education of Social Studies Teachers

Principles and Practices of Democracy in the Education of Social Studies Teachers

This collection of essays was derived from a meeting sponsored by the Center for Civic Education (California) and conducted by the Social Studies Development Center (Indiana). The meeting's central theme was education for democratic citizenship of prospective social studies teachers. Following an introduction, essays in the collection are: (1) "Why Should Civic Learning Be at the Core of Social Studies Teacher Education in the United States?" (R. F. Butts); (2) "Content at the Core of Education for Citizenship in a Democracy" (M. S. Branson); (3) "Components of Education for Democratic Citizenship in the Preparation of Social Studies Teachers" (J. J. Patrick and T. S. Vontz); (4) "Beyond the Methods Course: Civics as the Program Core in Elementary Teacher Education" (T. C. Mason and D. Y. Silva); (5) "Teaching to Public Controversy in a Democracy" (D. Hess); (6) "Teaching Teachers To Lead Discussions: Democratic Education in Content and Method" (W. C. Parker); (7) "Civic Intelligence and Liberal Intelligence in the History Education of Social Studies Teachers and Students" (L. R. Nelson and F. D. Drake); (8) "Using 'We the People...' Programs in Social Studies Teacher Education" (N. Haas); (9) "Democratic Teacher Education through Multicultural Service Learning" (M. Boyle-Baise); (10) "Education for Citizenship in a Democracy through Teacher Education: Examples from Australia" (M. Print); (11) "Education for Citizenship in a Democracy through Teacher Education: The Case of an American-Russian Partnership" (S. L. Schechter and C. S. White); and "Conclusion: Recommendations and Reactions." Appended are: "Civic Education: A Time of Challenge and Hope" (B. E. McClellan) and "Civic Education in Untroubled Times" (D. Warren). (BT)

We the Students and Teachers

We  the Students and Teachers

We the Students and Teachers

Provides practical applications of democratic teaching for classes in history/social studies education, multicultural and social justice education, community service and civic engagement, and education and public policy. We, the Students and Teachers shows history and social studies educators how to make school classrooms into democratic spaces for teaching and learning. The book offers practical strategies and lesson ideas for transforming democratic theory into instructional practice. It stresses the importance of students and teachers working together to create community and change. The book serves as an essential text for history and social studies teaching methods courses as well as professional development and inservice programs for history and social studies teachers at all grade levels. “The key to the excellent potential of this book is its assertion that democratic teaching can be linked to content, especially historical content, not just to a generic notion of ‘student-centered instruction.’ The theory-to-practice emphasis is very explicit, as is the emphasis on the voices of the teachers and students who participated in the research. The book also takes a highly creative approach to its topic that I find very refreshing.” — Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida “This is an important book. Maloy and LaRoche reveal the challenges that face historians as we grapple with increasingly fraught public and political perceptions of our discipline. Their strategies for reconstituting the classroom as a laboratory for instilling democratic values and practices are both ingenious and practical.” — Dane Morrison, author of True Yankees: Sea Captains, the South Seas, and the Discovery of American Identity

The Social Studies Curriculum

The Social Studies Curriculum

The Social Studies Curriculum

This updated third edition contains new chapters on important issues—including race, gender, sexuality, and multiculturalism—affecting social studies education.

Social Studies in Elementary Education

Social Studies in Elementary Education

Social Studies in Elementary Education

The author wrote this new edition of the most popular elementary social studies methods text on the market with the following three goals in mind: to present the most powerful social studies content and pedagogy for children in elementary school, to offer the material in simple and accessible ways, and to write in a first person active voice. The purpose of this book is to introduce new teachers to the world of social studies teaching and learning in elementary and middle schools. Geography, history, government and the other social sciences are delivered into the palm of the new teacher's hand along with a suite of tools for bringing social studies to life in the classroom. The book is organized into three sections—the first orients the reader to the mission of social studies education to the increasingly diverse children we teach, the second concentrates on the curriculum, and the third deals with instruction, how we plan and teach this curriculum. Three central themes continue to pervade the book—democratic citizenship, diversity, and the social sciences—to ultimately encourage teachers to excite their students about closing the gap between social realities and democratic ideals. An exceptionally strong chapter on multicultural issues (Chapter 2) helps future teachers truly understand the changing demographics of the American classroom. Abridged NCSS standards and their classroom applications are found at www.myeducationlab.com.

SAGE Handbook of Education for Citizenship and Democracy

SAGE Handbook of Education for Citizenship and Democracy

SAGE Handbook of Education for Citizenship and Democracy

This handbook brings together new work by some of the leading authorities on citizenship education, and is divided into five sections. The first section deals with key ideas about citizenship education including democracy, rights, globalization and equity. Section two contains a wide range of national case studies of citizenship education including African, Asian, Australian, European and North and South American examples. The third section focuses on perspectives about citizenship education with discussions about key areas such as sustainable development, anti-racism, gender. Section four provides insights into different characterisations of citizenship education with illustrations of democratic schools, peace and conflict education, global education, human rights education etc. The final section provides a series of chapters on the pedagogy of citizenship education with discussions about curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment.