In the Shadow of Denali

In the Shadow of Denali

In the Shadow of Denali

A classic in the genre of mountain literature—with a new preface by the author Rising more than 20,000 feet into the Alaskan sky is Denali, the tallest mountain in North America. In this collection of exhilarating and stunning narratives, Jonathan Waterman paints a startlingly intimate portrait of the white leviathan and brings to vivid life men and women whose fates have entwined on its sheer icy peak.

Mount McKinley

Mount McKinley

Mount McKinley

Shows different views of the mountain, and describes the many attempts at reaching the mountain's peak

Ascent of Denali

Ascent of Denali

Ascent of Denali

Though born and raised in England, explorer HUDSON STUCK (1865-1920) epitomized the adventurous New World spirit of the American West at its closing. Drawn by the wide-open spaces, Stuck, an Episcopal priest and champion of a rugged brand of "muscular Christianity," volunteered in 1904 to serve as the archdeacon of the Yukon; his spiritual domain encompassed 250,000 square miles of interior Alaska. Here, he achieved international fame by leading the first successful expedition, in 1913, to scale the highest peak in North America: Mount McKinley, though Stuck, long a defender of native culture, insisted on calling it by its Indian name, Denali. In this 1914 book, Stuck regales us with his dramatic account of the journey, from the dangers posed by sudden storms to the beauty of the glaciers, from the unexpected setbacks-like the fire that swept through their gear-to the "infinite attractiveness" of the challenge. Armchair travelers and lovers of extreme sports alike will thrill to this exciting tale. ALSO AVAILABLE FROM COSIMO: Stuck's Ten Thousand Miles with a Dog Sled

The Ascent of Denali Mount McKinley

The Ascent of Denali  Mount McKinley

The Ascent of Denali Mount McKinley

Reproduction of the original: The Ascent of Denali (Mount McKinley by Hudson Stuck

Minus 148 Degrees Anniversary Edition

Minus 148 Degrees  Anniversary Edition

Minus 148 Degrees Anniversary Edition

CLICK HERE to download the first 50 pages from (Provide us with a little information and we'll send your download directly to your inbox) "This finely crafted adventure tale runs on adrenaline but also something else: brutal honesty." —The Wall Street Journal "I couldn't lay it down until it was all finished (12:40 a.m.!)... A fascinating and beautifully-written story." —Bradford Washburn * One of National Geographic Adventure's "The 100 Greatest Adventure Books of All Time" * Spring 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the first ascent of Mount McKinley * New edition includes a revised preface, new prologue, and new afterword describing more recent winter attempts on McKinley In 1967, eight men attempted North America's highest summit: Mount McKinley (now known as Denali) had been climbed before—but never in winter. Plagued by doubts and cold, group tension and a crevasse tragedy, the expedition tackled McKinley in minimal hours of daylight and fierce storms. They were trapped at three different camps above 14,000 feet during a six-day blizzard and faced the ultimate low temperature of -148° F. Minus 148° is Art Davidson's stunning personal narrative, supplemented by diary excerpts from team members George Wichman, John Edwards, Dave Johnston, and Greg Blomberg. Davidson retells the team's fears and frictions—and ultimate triumph—with an honesty that has made this gripping survival story a mountaineering classic for over 40 years. Minus 148° is featured among many "best of" reading lists, including National Geographic Adventure's "The 100 Greatest Adventure Books of all Time." "At twenty-two I came to regard the first expedition to Mt. McKinley in the winter as a journey into an unexplored land. No one had lived on North America's highest ridges in the winter twilight. No one knew how low the temperatures would drop, or how penetrating the cold would be when the wind blew. For thousands of years McKinley's storms had raged by themselves." —Minus 148° This title is part of our LEGENDS AND LORE series. Click here > to learn more.

Mount McKinley

Mount McKinley

Mount McKinley


Surviving Denali

Surviving Denali

Surviving Denali

The motivation for writing this book is to dispel themyth of Denali as a cakewalk, and to help climbersprepare adequately for polar, high-altitude survival. Bylearning from the past, climbers can avoid similarproblems; this is the goal of Surviving Denali. Watermanpresents an in-depth analysis of altitude medicalproblems, frostbite, ......

The Wolves of Mount McKinley

The Wolves of Mount McKinley

The Wolves of Mount McKinley

In the time of Lewis and Clark, wolves were abundant throughout North America from the Arctic regions to Mexico. But man declared war on this cunning and powerful animal when cattle replaced the buffalo on the western plains, reducing the wolf�s range to those few areas in the Far North where economic necessity did not call for its extinction. Between 1939 and 1941, Adolph Murie, one of North America�s greatest naturalists, made a field study of the relationship between wolves and Dall sheep in Mount McKinley National Park (since renamed Denali National Park) which has come to be respected as a classic work of natural history. In this study Murie not only described the life cycle of Alaskan wolves in greater detail than has ever been done, but he discovered a great deal about the entire ecological network of predator and prey. The issues surrounding the survival of the wolf and its prey are more important today than ever, and Murie helps us understand the careful balance that must be maintained to ensure that these magnificent animals prosper. Originally available only in government publications which are long out-of-print, this account of a much maligned animal is now available in its first popular edition.

Denali s Howl

Denali s Howl

Denali s Howl

In 1967, twelve young men attempted to climb Alaska’s Mount McKinley – known to locals as Denali, ‘The High One’ – one of the most popular and deadly mountaineering destinations in the world. Only five survived. Journalist Andy Hall grew up in the mountain’s shadow, the son of the ranger on duty at the time of the tragedy, and has spent years tracking down survivors, lost documents and recordings of radio communications to piece together the chain of events. In Denali’s Howl, Hall reveals the full story of an expedition facing conditions conclusively established here for the first time: At an elevation of nearly 20,000 feet, these young men endured an “arctic super blizzard,” with howling winds of up to 300 miles an hour and wind chill that freezes flesh solid in minutes. All this without the high-tech gear and equipment climbers use today. As well as the story of the men caught inside the storm, Denali’s Howl is the story of those caught outside it trying to save them - Hall’s father among them. The book gives readers a detailed look at the culture of climbing then and now and raises uncomfortable questions about each player in this tragedy. Was enough done to rescue the climbers, or were their fates sealed when they ascended into the path of this unprecedented storm?