Diaspora of the Gods

Diaspora of the Gods

Diaspora of the Gods

Many Hindus today are urban middle-class people with religious values similar to those of their professional counterparts in America and Europe. Just as modern professionals continue to build new churches, synagogues, and now mosques, Hindus are erecting temples to their gods wherever their work and their lives take them. Despite the perceived exoticism of Hindu worship, the daily life-style of these avid temple patrons differs little from their suburban neighbors. Joanne Waghorne leads her readers on a journey through this new middle-class Hindu diaspora, focusing on their efforts to build and support places of worship. She seeks to trace the changing religious sensibilities of the middle classes as written on their temples and on the faces of their gods. She offers detailed comparisons of temples in Chennai (formerly Madras), London, and Washington, D.C., and interviews temple priests, devotees, and patrons. In the process, she illuminates the interrelationships between ritual worship and religious edifices, the rise of the modern world economy, and the ascendancy of the great middle class. The result is a comprehensive portrait of Hinduism as lived today by so many both in India and throughout the world. Lavishly illustrated with professional photographs by Dick Waghorne, this book will appeal to art historians as well as urban anthropologists, scholars of religion, and those interested in diaspora, transnationalism, and trends in contemporary religion. It should be especially appealing for course use because it introduces the modern Hinduism practiced by the friends and neighbors of students in the U.S. and Britain.

A New God in the Diaspora

A New God in the Diaspora

A New God in the Diaspora

'A new god in the diaspora?' provides an ethnographic documentation of urban Hindu religiosity that greatly enhances our understanding of diasporic religions.

Orisa

Orisa

Orisa


James Diaspora Rhetoric of a Friend of God

James  Diaspora Rhetoric of a Friend of God

James Diaspora Rhetoric of a Friend of God

The Letter of James has been greatly underestimated. Some have regarded it as no more than a random set of wisdom sayings with minimal theology. Many have dismissed it as too late a writing to be interesting for the beginnings of Christianity. In this Guide Margaret Aymer sets out to counter such assessments. The key focus of the letter of James, a homily in form, is its impassioned argument for living 'unstained by the world' in the Diaspora. Against the charge that James is theologically weak, Aymer focuses on its theology of God's divine singularity and im-mutability, and of God's relationship to the community as father and benefactor. These are theological foundations for its emphasis on praxis, that is, community actions of be-lief, humility and mutual care. James's community does not live in a utopia. The letter of James takes its stand against empire, not least in regard to wealth, though it is in alignment with empire over matters of gender and power. Divine power is envisioned as an al-ternative power to that of the Romans, though in some re-spects it can seem equally brutal. Aymer concludes by focusing on those addressed by James's homily, the exiles in diaspora. Engaging the psychology of migration, she unpacks the migrant strategy underlying James's call to living 'unstained'. But that leads into a fur-ther issue that arises once James becomes part of a scrip-ture. What might it now mean, she asks, for twenty-first century people to take seriously a separatist migrant dis-course not only as an interesting ancient writing but as a scripture, a lens through which its readers can glimpse the possibilities for how lives are to be lived, and how contem-porary worlds can be interpreted and engaged?

The African Diaspora

The African Diaspora

The African Diaspora


Diaspora the Australasian Experience

Diaspora  the Australasian Experience

Diaspora the Australasian Experience

Contributed articles presented at the conference organized by Association for the Study of Australasia in Asia.

Hindu Diaspora

Hindu Diaspora

Hindu Diaspora


James An Introduction and Study Guide

James  An Introduction and Study Guide

James An Introduction and Study Guide

In this guide Margaret Aymer introduces the letter of James, countering arguments that it is of limited theological value and significance for early Christianity. Aymer focuses on James' theology of God's divine singularity and immutability, and of God's relationship to the community as father and benefactor. These are theological foundations for its emphasis on community actions of belief, humility and mutual care. Aymer introduces and examines the letter's stand against empire, not least in regard to wealth. Divine power is envisioned as an alternative power to that of the Romans, though in some respects it can seem equally brutal. Aymer concludes by focusing on those addressed by James's homily, the exiles in diaspora. Engaging the psychology of migration, she unpacks the migrant strategy underlying James's call to living 'unstained'. Finally, Aymer encourages student to ask what it might mean now for twenty-first-century people to take seriously a separatist migrant discourse not only as an interesting ancient writing but as a scripture, a lens through which its readers can glimpse the possibilities for how lives are to be lived, and how contemporary worlds can be interpreted and engaged?

Diaspora Jews and Judaism

Diaspora Jews and Judaism

Diaspora Jews and Judaism

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