Division Street

Division Street

Division Street

Chronicles the thoughts and feelings of some seventy people from widely varying backgrounds in terms of class, race and personal history all inhabitants of a single city in Chicago as a microcosm of the nation at large.

The Studs Terkel Reader

The Studs Terkel Reader

The Studs Terkel Reader

A beautiful paperback edition of Terkel's greatest hits. For this volume, Studs himself selected the best interviews from eight of his classic books: American Dreams, Coming of Age, Division Street, The Good War, The Great Divide, Hard Times, Race and Working - together with his original introductions to each book. Published in the year of teh great man's 95th birthday, it's a keeper from the United States' foremost oral historian and the bestselling author of 12 legendary books of oral history.

The Division Street Princess

The Division Street Princess

The Division Street Princess

The author looks back on her childhood in the 1940s where her Jewish family lived in a three-room apartment above their grocery store in Chicago and tells tales of neighborhood life, family struggles, and the colorful characters that made up life in her unique community.

American Dreams

American Dreams

American Dreams

A cross-section of Americans--from an embittered Miss America to Arnold Schwarzenegger, from Jesse Helms to a KKK member, from businessmen and Brahmins to activists and immigrants--speak of their hopes, expectations, and disappointments

Hard Times

Hard Times

Hard Times

Recreates the character and atmosphere of this dramatic era in a collage of recollections by both well-known and obscure Americans.

Best Sellers

Best Sellers

Best Sellers


Studs Terkel

Studs Terkel

Studs Terkel

Studs Terkel was an American icon who had no use for America’s cult of celebrity. He was a leftist who valued human beings over political dogma. In scores of books and thousands of radio and television broadcasts, Studs paid attention – and respect – to “ordinary” human beings of all classes and colors, as they talked about their lives as workers, dreamers, survivors. Alan Wieder’s Studs Terkel: Politics, Culture, But Mostly Conversation is the first comprehensive book about this man. Drawing from over one hundred interviews of people who knew and worked with Studs, Alan Wieder creates a multi-dimensional portrait of a run-of-the-mill guy from Chicago who, in public life, became an acclaimed author and raconteur, while managing, in his private life, to remain a mensch. We see Studs, the eminent oral historian, the inveterate and selfless supporter of radical causes, especially civil rights. We see the actor, the writer, the radio host, the jazz lover, whose early work in television earned him a notorious place on the McCarthy blacklist. We also see Studs the family man and devoted husband to his adored wife, Ida. Studs Terkel: Politics, Culture, But Mostly Conversation allows us to realize the importance of reaching through our own daily realities – increasingly clogged with disembodied, impersonal interaction – to find value in actual face-time with real humans. Wieder’s book also shows us why such contact might be crucial to those of us in movements rising up against global tyranny and injustice. The book is simply the best introduction available to this remarkable man. Reading it will lead people to Terkel’s enormous body of work, with benefits they will cherish throughout their lives.

Studs Terkel

Studs Terkel

Studs Terkel

"Described in a 1980 Newsweek profile as "The Great American Ear," Studs Terkel is probably this country's best-known oral historian. His search for the "truth" about his country has perhaps inadvertently earned him the role of spokesman for the Common American of all regions and religions. Terkel has used his hometown of Chicago as something of a case study for divining the state of the Union; his many years as a disc jockey and radio-show host there have imbued him with a street-smart repartee that he has smoothly translated to the written word. For Terkel, words and music have an innate and distinctly American bond, and elements of jazz, in particular, have found their way into his ongoing dialogue with America." "In this comprehensive look at the Terkel omnibus of writings, James T. Baker underscores his subject's unique place among social commentators: though his books are always literate and poignant, Terkel stays a healthy arm's length away from the description "man of letters." His most recent book identifies race as the foremost American obsession, but Terkel has, according to Baker, made his way through life exploring an array of American obsessions - from religion to baseball to jazz to the Progressive and Populist party politics of earlier eras and the ailing state of the Democrats and Republicans in our own time." "Baker finds that, in his oral histories (Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression [1970], Working: People Talk about What They Do All Day and How The Feel about What They Do [1974], "The Good War": An Oral History of World War II [1984], and Race: How Blacks and Whites Think and Feel about the American Obsession [1992]), Terkel elicits a candor from interviewees that ultimately questions the complacent, status quo rendering of U.S. history. This slice-of-life reportage, says Baker, springs from Terkel's early days in television, primarily with his show "Studs' Place," which made its debut on NBC television in 1950 and was described by its host as so "true to life" that "Brecht would have roared" at it." "Probably Chicago's most eminent octogenarian, Terkel has led a life of interesting contradictions, Baker points out: he is somewhat of an "expert" on American ethnic minorities, many of them far removed from his own urbanity. A white Jewish man, he is often at home in a black Baptist church listening to the gospel music of Mahalia Jackson. Reared in a thoroughly capitalist home by a mother who dreamed of riches, he is a socialist. Fervently devoted to Chicago, "The City That Works," he rejects its political values and considers the agrarian Progressive Robert La Follette his hero." "Baker's engaging and biographically copious appraisal of Terkel's portraiture of America and its people - from Division Street: America (1967) to American Dreams, Lost and Found (1980) to The Great Divide: Second Thoughts on the American Dream (1988) - should be of great value to anyone interested in the social and popular-culture histories not found in textbook versions of twentieth-century America."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved