Dogen and Soto Zen

Dogen and Soto Zen

Dogen and Soto Zen

Dogen's use of Rujing's 'just sit' (shikan taza) and other Koans T. Griffith Foulk -- 'Raihaitokuzui' and Dogen's views of gender and women : a reconsideration Miriam Levering -- Dogen, a medieval Japanese monk well-versed in Chinese poetry : what he did and did not compose Steven Heine -- Negotiating the divide of death in Japanese Buddhism : Dogen's difference John C. Maraldo -- 'When all dharmas are the Buddha-dharma' : Dogen as comparative philosopher Gereon Kopf -- Keizan's Denkoroku : a textual and contextual overview William M. Bodiford -- Are Soto Zen precepts for ethical guidance or ceremonial transformation? Menzan's attempted reforms and contemporary practices David Riggs -- Vocalizing the remembrance of Dogen : a study of the Shinpen hoon koshiki Michaela Mross -- Interpreting the material heritage of the 'elephant trunk robe' in Soto zen Diane Riggs -- Embodying Soto Zen : institutional identity and ideal body-image at Daihonzan Eiheiji Pamela D. Winfield.

A Primer of Soto Zen

A Primer of Soto Zen

A Primer of Soto Zen

The Shobogenzo Zuimonki consists largely of brief talks, hortatory remarks, and instructional and cautionary comments by the Soto Zen Master Dogen. Translated, shobogenzo means 'the eye of the true law.' Roughly translated zuimonki means 'easy for the ears to understand, ' or 'simplified.'

Receiving the Marrow

Receiving the Marrow

Receiving the Marrow

Dogen's great spiritual teachings are the foundation of Soto Zen. For the first time, contemporary American women Zen masters in the Soto tradition, join together to reach within Dogen's mind to make his masterpieces accessible and practical for those seeking deeper realization and understanding.

Not Zen Dogen Buddhism

Not Zen  Dogen Buddhism

Not Zen Dogen Buddhism

Get to know real Caodong/Soto Masters like Dongshan and Wansong.Learn how churches calling themselves "Soto Zen" are really Dogen Buddhists, followers of a messianic guru called Dogen, with no historical or doctrinal connection to Caodong and Soto Zen. Learn how Dogen invented Zazen prayer-meditation and "practice-enlightenment" and lied about it.Learn how Dogen lied about what Rujing and Bodidharma teach.Learn how real Caodong and Soto Zen is about sudden and permanent enlightenment - no meditation required.

Dogen s Manuals of Zen Meditation

Dogen s Manuals of Zen Meditation

Dogen s Manuals of Zen Meditation

Zen Buddhism is perhaps best known for its emphasis on meditation, and probably no figure in the history of Zen is more closely associated with meditation practice than the thirteenth-century Japanese master Dogen, founder of the Soto school. This study examines the historical and religious character of the practice as it is described in Dogen's own meditation texts, introducing new materials and original perspectives on one of the most influential spiritual traditions of East Asian civilization. The Soto version of Zen meditation is known as "just sitting," a practice in which, through the cultivation of the subtle state of "nonthinking," the meditator is said to be brought into perfect accord with the higher consciousness of the "Buddha mind" inherent in all beings. This study examines the historical and religious character of the practice as it is described in Dogen's own meditation texts, introducing new materials and original perspectives on one of the most influential spiritual traditions of East Asian civilization.

Engaging Dogen s Zen

Engaging Dogen s Zen

Engaging Dogen s Zen

How are the teachings of a thirteenth-century master relevant today? Twenty contemporary writers unpack Dogen's words and show how we can still find meaning in his teachings. Zen Master Dogen, the thirteenth-century founder of Japanese Soto Zen Buddhism, is widely regarded as one of the world’s most remarkable spiritual thinkers. Dogen influence on both Japanese and Western Zen Buddhism cannot be overstated. His writings, emphasizing the nonduality of practice and enlightenment are vastly subtle, endlessly sophisticated—and renownedly challenging to read on one’s own. This unique collection of essays opens up for the reader new pathways for connecting to and making use of Dogen's powerful teachings. Some of Soto Zen’s leading scholars and practitioners offer a masterfully guided tour of Dogen’s writings, organized around two key texts: Shushogi, which is a classical distillation of the whole of Dogen’s teachings, and Fukanzazengi, Dogen universal instructions for Zen meditation. Along the way, the reader will gain an enriched understanding of the Zen practice and realization, of shikantaza or “just sitting,” and of the essence of Mahayana Buddhism—and a much deeper appreciation of this peerless master. Includes essays from Kosho Itagaki, Taigen Dan Leighton, Tenshin Charles Fletcher, Shudo Brian Schroeder, Glen A. Mazis, David Loy, Drew Leder, Steven DeCaroli, Steve Bein, John Maraldo, Michael Schwartz, Tetsuzen Jason M. Wirth, Leah Kalmanson, Erin Jien McCarthy, Dainen David Putney, Steven Heine, Graham Parkes, Mark Unno, Shudo Brian Schroeder, and Kanpu Bret W. Davis.

Beyond Thinking

Beyond Thinking

Beyond Thinking

Spiritual practice is not some kind of striving to produce enlightenment, but an expression of the enlightenment already inherent in all things: Such is the Zen teaching of Dogen Zenji (1200–1253) whose profound writings have been studied and revered for more than seven hundred years, influencing practitioners far beyond his native Japan and the Soto school he is credited with founding. In focusing on Dogen's most practical words of instruction and encouragement for Zen students, this new collection highlights the timelessness of his teaching and shows it to be as applicable to anyone today as it was in the great teacher's own time. Selections include Dogen's famous meditation instructions; his advice on the practice of zazen, or sitting meditation; guidelines for community life; and some of his most inspirational talks. Also included are a bibliography and an extensive glossary.

Did Dogen Go to China

Did Dogen Go to China

Did Dogen Go to China

Dogen (1200-1253), the founder of the Soto Zen sect in Japan, is especially known for introducing to Japanese Buddhism many of the texts and practices that he discovered in China. Heine reconstructs the context of Dogen's travels to and reflections on China by means of a critical look at traditional sources both by and about Dogen in light of recent Japanese scholarship. While many studies emphasize the unique features of Dogen's Japanese influences, this book calls attention to the way Chinese and Japanese elements were fused in Dogen's religious vision. It reveals many new materials and insights into Dogen's main writings, including the multiple editions of the Shobogenzo, and how and when this seminal text was created by Dogen and was edited and interpreted by his disciples. This book is the culmination of the author's thirty years of research on Dogen and provides the reader with a comprehensive approach to the master's life works and an understanding of the overall career trajectory of one of the most important figures in the history of Buddhism and Asian religious thought.

The Essential Dogen

The Essential Dogen

The Essential Dogen

Eihei Dogen (1200–1253), founder of the Soto School of Zen Buddhism, is one of the greatest religious, philosophical, and literary geniuses of Japan. His writings have been studied by Zen students for centuries, particularly his masterwork, Shobo Genzo or Treasury of the True Dharma Eye. This is the first book to offer the great master’s incisive wisdom in short selections taken from the whole range of his voluminous works. The pithy and powerful readings, arranged according to theme, provide a perfect introduction to Dogen—and inspire spiritual practice in people of all traditions.