Knuckleball

Knuckleball

Knuckleball

Never forgetting his mother's words of wisdom, Davie lives life to the fullest, shows promise as a baseball player, discovers love and a rewarding career as a public relations professional, and swings at life's knuckleballs with faith that is tested time and again.

The Perfect Game

The Perfect Game

The Perfect Game

When a championship-bound coach (Patrick Duffy) adds some notoriously untalented kids to his team on a bet, the players view it as their chance to learn from the master. But the scheming coach has other plans, which include not letting them play. When young Kanin and friends uncover the plot and the coach is dismissed, the team disintegrates--or does it? With the help of Kanin's determined mom (Tracy Nelson) and a past-his-prime coach (a blustery Ed Asner), the multiracial, coed team pulls it together enough to make it to the playoffs, where they face... you guessed it, Duffy and his new team. The latest in a long line of underdog kids sports movies, which started with The Bad New Bears, this 96-minute film from Disney TV has neither the wit nor the grit of its inspiration, but it serves as reasonable family entertainment. Baseball fans will have to forgive its casual approach to the rules of the game, however. (Ages 5 and older).

The Knucklebook

The Knucklebook

The Knucklebook

This little book will teach you all you need to know about the most frustrating yet entertaining pitch in baseball: the knuckleball. "Clark masterfully breaks down the pitch, the mindset, and could save the pitch from extinction with this important work."—Will Carroll.

The 1988 Dodgers

The 1988 Dodgers

The 1988 Dodgers

When most baseball fans think back to the 1988 World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland Athletics, they probably remember Kirk Gibson’s dramatic home run off Dennis Eckersley, Orel Hershiser’s shutout streak and dominant postseason pitching that got them there, or perhaps the fact that it remains, to this day, the last World Championship for the Dodgers. In The 1988 Dodgers: Reliving the Championship Season, K. P. Wee tells the story of this incredible year. More than just Gibson or Hershiser, the team’s success came from a true collective effort in which all 25 players on the roster made significant contributions throughout the season. Featuring dozens of interviews with players—including those lesser-known Dodgers who were just as important to the team as the stars—coaches, scouts, and general manager Fred Claire, Wee provides a refreshing view of the 1988 season, sharing personal stories and little-known anecdotes told to him by the players and staff. The players also reflect on the importance of the entire team that season, their careers following the World Championship, and life after baseball, giving readers a complete inside look at a season and team to remember.

John Cangelosi

John Cangelosi

John Cangelosi

John Cangelosi teams up with noted sports writer K. P. Wee to share stories of growing up in Brooklyn and what it took to become an MLB player. This is an inside look at a real everyman of baseball, full of stories about stealing bases against legendary pitchers and catchers, and how it felt to celebrate the first championship in Marlins history.

The Fall of the Roman Umpire

The Fall of the Roman Umpire

The Fall of the Roman Umpire

Pays tribute to the many unheralded heroes of major league baseball

The 1993 Canadiens

The 1993 Canadiens

The 1993 Canadiens

Never to be confused with any previous Montreal Canadien “Flying Frenchmen” juggernauts who dominated the NHL between the 1950s and 1970s, the 1992-93 Canadiens, whose lone superstar was future Hall-of-Fame goaltender Patrick Roy, were essentially a nondescript team coming off an embarrassing second-round playoff series sweep against the Boston Bruins the previous spring. Yet these Habs, led by the goaltending of Roy and with timely goals from various unlikely heroes, stunned the hockey world by winning a record 10 consecutive playoff overtime games over a magical seven-week run during the spring of 1993. Montreal ultimately captured hockey’s ultimate prize that June—the 24th championship in franchise history—in the last Stanley Cup Finals series ever played at the venerable Montreal Forum. While the Canadiens had veteran presence in Kirk Muller, Vincent Damphousse, Brian Bellows, Denis Savard and Guy Carbonneau, Montreal might not have won the Cup without unlikely heroes like Gilbert Dionne, Stephan Lebeau and Paul DiPietro scoring goals in the clutch. Others such as Gary Leeman and Mario Roberge, despite not always being in the lineup, contributed in ways that didn’t necessarily show up on the scoresheet. And behind the bench, while Jacques Demers made all the right moves that spring, he isn’t even considered today among the top 50 coaches of all-time. More than a quarter century later, these Habs remain the last Canadian-based team to win the Cup—and in The 1993 Canadiens: Seven Magical Weeks, Unlikely Heroes and Canada’s Last Stanley Cup Champions, K. P. Wee relives the story of this incredible season.

Beanball

Beanball

Beanball

This is the ultimate baseball novel complete with all the behind-the-scenes excitement of a World Series as only a star player knows it.