Earned Value Project Management Fourth Edition

Earned Value Project Management   Fourth Edition

Earned Value Project Management Fourth Edition

Organizations that follow the principles of good Earned Value Management (EVM) create an environment that allows teams to successfully operate and thrive — even in the face of challenges that could negatively impact their projects.Earned Value Project Management (EVPM) is a methodology used to measure and communicate the real physical progress of a project taking into account the work completed, the time taken and the costs incurred to complete that work. As a result, EVPM allows more educated and effective management decision-making, which helps evaluate and control project risk by measuring project progress in monetary terms.In the first two editions of Earned Value Project Management, Quentin W. Fleming and Joel M. Koppelman provided guidance for project management practitioners already familiar with EVPM, was well as those who were new to the use of this technique. The third edition expanded the information available on of EVPM for medium and smaller projects while still being relevant for larger projects. An important addition to Earned Value Project Management – Fourth Edition is the discussion of the two perceptions of the EVM concept. Both are valid, but one is better suited to the management of major projects while the other appropriate for use on all projects. The authors cover both perceptions in this book, with a bias in favor of simple, broad-based EVM for use on all projects.

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

The Best Resource on Earned Value Management Just Got Better! This completely revised and updated guide to earned value (EV) project management is the go-to choice for both corporate and government professionals. A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management, Second Edition, first offers a general overview of basic project management best practices and then delves into detailed information on EV metrics and criteria, EV reporting mechanisms, and the 32 criteria of earned value management systems (EVMS) promulgated by the American National Standards Institute and the Electronic Industries Alliance and adopted by the Department of Defense. This second edition includes new material on: • EV metrics • Implementing EVMS • Government contracts • Time-based earned schedule metrics • Critical chain methodologies

The Standard for Earned Value Management

The Standard for Earned Value Management

The Standard for Earned Value Management

Earned value management (EVM) is a management methodology for integrating scope, schedule, and resources; objectively measuring project performance and progress; and forecasting project outcome. It is considered by many to be one of the most effective performance measurement and feedback tools for managing projects. The Standard for Earned Value Management builds on the concepts for EVM described in the Practice Standard for Earned Value Management and includes enhanced project delivery information, by integrating concepts and practices from the PMBOK® Guide – Sixth Edition and The Agile Practice Guide. A central theme in this standard is the recognition that the definition for value in EVM has expanded. While the term retains its traditional definition in terms of project cost, it embraces current practice by including the concept of earned schedule. This standard also integrates hybrid methodologies that blend together historical EVM concepts with the needs of the agile practitioner, all with an eye towards aiding the project team in enhancing overall project delivery. This standard is a useful tool for experienced project management practitioners who are seeking to expand and update their knowledge of the field as well as less experienced practitioners who want to learn other approaches for managing project performance. It provides insight and detailed explanations of the basic elements and processes of EVM, and demonstrates how to scale EVM to fit varying project sizes and situations. This standard includes graphical examples and detailed explanations that will enable the reader to establish and implement EVM on projects in almost any environment and of almost every size. When used together with good project management principles, EVM methodology will provide a greater return on any project and results that will directly benefit your organization.

Using Earned Value

Using Earned Value

Using Earned Value

The concept of 'earned value' as a project management tool has been around since the 1960s; although recognized as an important technique and widely used on US Government contracts, it failed to excite much interest in the wider world because of its specifically American requirements and the cumbersome, prescriptive bureaucracy that seemed to accompany it. Recently however, with the advent of suitable software and used in a much more flexible way, there has been a growth in interest among project managers. Crucially it has been recognised that this technique can be helpful in a wide variety of projects of almost any size, not just government projects costing billions of pounds. In essence, earned value allows the project manager a more precise view of actual project performance in terms of both value generated and schedule progress than is possible with any other approach. Alan Webb's concise guide provides practising project managers with everything they need to: ¢ assess the appropriateness and benefits of the earned value process for both their project(s) and their organization; ¢ appreciate, understand and learn the techniques involved; ¢ identify how to apply the data to manage projects with flexibility, pragmatism and rigour; ¢ understand the different features and benefits of the various software packages available; ¢ plan for the introduction of an earned value methodology, anticipating both the systems and people problems they may face. The book uses worked examples, cases and anecdotes from the author's own extensive experience to bring this technical subject to life. Alan's writing style is direct and economical, which means that whether you are dipping into chapters for reference or reading about the process from cover to cover, everything he has to say is pertinent and helpful.

Earned Value Management Using Microsoft Office Project

Earned Value Management Using Microsoft Office Project

Earned Value Management Using Microsoft Office Project

Schedule and cost management are the most essential parts of project lifecycle management and many projects fail as a result of not managing these critical components effectively. The most commonly used tool for project schedule management is Microsoft Office Project, which is designed to assist project managers in developing schedules, assigning resources to tasks, tracking progress, managing budgets and analyzing workloads. The most common technique used for cost management is earned value management (EVM), a project management technique used for measuring project progress in an objective manner that combines measurements of project scope, schedule and cost performance within a single integrated methodology. EVM is becoming the standard across the world for this purpose in both the private and public sector and many organizations are now adopting this technique to manage their projects. In the public sector, EVM is mandated for all government projects in the United States and many other countries are following suit. Earned Value Management Using Microsoft® Office Project is the first reference to effectively combine the most widely used scheduling tool with the most widely accepted cost management technique. It is a practical guide to end-to-end scheduling and cost management using Microsoft Office Project that includes a CD-ROM of a limited version of a unique EVM software tool that will help practitioners more effectively manage their projects, track and report the status and progress of projects, and take necessary action before their projects fail beyond repair. This text is an excellent complement to whatever Microsoft Office Project guide that you may be using and a significant addition to the literature on how to use EVM.

Performance Based Earned Value

Performance Based Earned Value

Performance Based Earned Value

A complete toolkit for implementation of Earned Value Management Performance-Based Earned Value uniquely shows project managers how to effectively integrate technical, schedule, and cost objectives by improving earned value management (EVM) practices. Providing innovative guidelines, methods, examples, and templates consistent with capability models and standards, this book approaches EVM from a practical level with understandable techniques that are applicable to the management of any project. Clear and unambiguous instructions explain how to incorporate EVM with key systems engineering, software engineering, and project management processes such as establishing the technical or quality baseline, requirements management, using product metrics, and meeting success criteria for technical reviews. Detailed information is included on linking product requirements, project work products, the project plan, and the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), as well as correlating technical performance measures (TPM) with EVM. With straightforward instructions on how to use EVM on a simple project, such as building a house, and on complex projects, such as high-risk IT and engineering development projects, it is the only book that includes excerpts from the PMI®'s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), CMMI, the EVM System standard, systems engineering standards, federal acquisition regulations, and Department of Defense guides. Performance-Based Earned Value allows both novices and experienced project managers, including project manager of suppliers and customers in the commercial and government sectors; software and systems engineering process improvement leaders; CMMI appraisers; PMI members; and IEEE Computer Society members to: Incorporate product requirements and planned quality into the PMB Conduct an Integrated Baseline Review Analyze performance reports Perform independent assessments and predictive analysis Ensure that key TPMs are selected, monitored, and reported Identify the right success criteria for technical reviews Develop techniques for monitoring and controlling supplier performance Integrate risk management with EVM Comply with government acquisition policies and regulations Written by Paul Solomon and Ralph Young, internationally recognized industry experts, Performance-Based Earned Value is constructed from guidance in standards and capability models for EVM, systems engineering, software engineering, and project management. It is the complete guide to EVM, invaluable in helping students prepare for the PMI®-PMP® exam with practical examples and templates to facilitate understanding, and in guiding project professionals in the private and public sectors to use EVM on complex projects. (PMI, PMBOK, PMP, and Project Management Professional are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.)

EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT Integrated View of Cost and Schedule Performance

EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT  Integrated View of Cost and Schedule Performance

EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT Integrated View of Cost and Schedule Performance

This book is organized with a brief overview of EVM, highlighting the key management questions EVM can help answer and exploring where EVM fits into the projet management universe. It also emphasizes EVM Performance Analysis and contains the basic elements of Earned Value Management. This book also outlines basic EVM practices in their project management context and shows how EVM practices facilitate project planning and control for better management of project cost and schedule performance.

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management

The go-to choice for both corporate and government professionals, A Practical Guide to Earned Value Project Management offers an overview of basic project management best practices and provides more detailed information about earned value (EV) project management. This fully revised and updated second edition covers EV metrics, EV reporting mechanisms, and the 32 criteria of successful earned value management systems (EVMS) as promulgated by the American National Standards Institute and the Electronic Industries Alliance and adopted by the US Department of Defense. This new edition has also been reorganized to enhance readability while retaining the same trusted and comprehensive approach as the first edition. You'll acquire even more insight into the mechanics of EVMS, build a thorough understanding of the processes involved, and benefit from the authors' practical presentation of how to best implement EVMS practices.

How to Make Earned Value Work on Your Project

How to Make Earned Value Work on Your Project

How to Make Earned Value Work on Your Project

Earned value analysis (EVA) appears to be a compelling technique to use on projects to better understand and manage performance. Companies embracing earned value prepare procedures and may provide some basic training. Project managers are then told to start using earned value, with the management expectation that project results will soon improve. Usually about a year later, reality sets in. No improvement is achieved, project management costs are up, and people are complaining about all of the "extra paperwork." The company then either decides to drop the use of earned value or brings in a consultant to help figure out what corrective actions should be taken to get earned value "back on track." This paper covers the top 10 items that must be present on any project for the use of earned value to be successful. It also covers suggested actions that should be applied to ensure the project can easily and successfully use earned value. This paper first provides a quick review of earned value terminology and formulas. Key metrics to monitor when using earned value analysis are discussed. Then top 10 items needed on projects when implementing earned value will be covered in detail. It reports how the key is having complete requirements and a good project plan, which includes the work breakdown structure (WBS) to fully document scope and a schedule and cost estimate that are integrated into the WBS. This paper isn't just about using earned value analysis; it really covers the more important topic of having a complete and integrated project plan in place, which is a cornerstone before using earned value management.

Earned Value Management 60 Minutes Compact Knowledge

Earned Value Management     60 Minutes Compact Knowledge

Earned Value Management 60 Minutes Compact Knowledge

In Just 60 Minutes You Will Learn Everything You Need to Know About Earned Value Management With Earned Value Management (EVM) you get the best project control tool that provides the necessary transparency and security in your projects. With EVM you quickly know the real status of your projects. Overly optimistic estimates regarding costs and project progress are quickly uncovered with EVM performance figures. You receive early warning signals to control the project successfully and you can also make early forecasts of project final costs and project duration. In this book you will learn in 60 Minutes the most important things about Earned Value Management in order to apply it successfully. You will learn the following topics: - Project control fundamentals - Project planning when using Earned Value Management - EVM Basic Performance Figures - The calculation of the Earned Value and its derived EVM performance figures - Project monitoring and forecasts with EVM performance figures - This book is perfect as an introduction and as a reference guide for everyday work, but also for education. It is the best preparation for the EVM questions in the PMI PMP® certification. This book is an indispensable manual for beginners in the EVM topic but also for experienced Project Managers, Project Controls Specialists and Project Portfolio Managers who have the first contact with EVM. The terminology used in this book is identical to the PMBOK® Guide Buy this book to make your projects even more successful!