Education in Popular Culture

Education in Popular Culture

Education in Popular Culture

Education in Popular Culture explores what makes schools, colleges, teachers and students an enduring focus for a wide range of contemporary media. What is it about the school experience that makes us wish to relive it again and again? The book provides an overview of education as it is represented in popular culture, together with a framework through which educators can interpret these representations in relation to their own professional values and development. The analyses are contextualised within contemporary, historical and ideological frameworks, and make connections between popular representations and professional and political discourses about education. Through its examination of film, television, popular lyrics and fiction, this book tackles educational themes that recur in popular culture, and demonstrates how they intersect with debates concerning teacher performance, the curriculum and young people’s behaviour and morality. Chapters explore how experiences of education are both reflected and constructed in ways that sometimes reinforce official and professional educational perspectives, and sometimes resist and oppose them. Education in Popular Culture will stimulate critical reflection on the popular myths and professional discourses that surround teachers and teaching. It will serve to deepen analyses of teaching and learning and their associated institutional and societal contexts in a creative and challenging way.

Imagining the Academy

Imagining the Academy

Imagining the Academy

The essays in this book examine various forms of popular culture and the ways in which they represent, shape, and are constrained by notions about and issues within higher education. From an exploration of rap music to an analysis of how the academy presents and markets itself on the World Wide Web, the essays focus attention on higher education issues that are bound up in the workings and effects of popular culture.

Schooling in the Light of Popular Culture

Schooling in the Light of Popular Culture

Schooling in the Light of Popular Culture

Annotation Explores an underexamined source of influence that affects the way schooling is experienced and understood in contemporary culture, namely the flow of symbolic forms comprising mainstream popular culture. The volume centers on the portrayal of aspects of schooling --its characteristics, participants, glories, and problems--as they are constructed and displayed in diverse forms of popular culture. The main assumption is that involvement in contemporary schooling at any level--as teacher, student, policymaker, administrator, or concerned citizen--is conditioned by the sociocultural context in which schooling is understood, a context that is in turn mediated by powerful forms of popular culture. Paper edition (1872-3), $19.95. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Doing Theory on Education

Doing Theory on Education

Doing Theory on Education

Doing Theory on Education explores key debates using examples from contemporary media and popular culture to guide Education Studies students through the perennial debates that surround teaching and learning. Aimed at undergraduates, postgraduates and teachers in education settings, it uses over seventy popular culture texts from television, music, videogames, fiction, film, architecture, social media, the press and art to illuminate important issues and make the critical theory that underpins educational debates more accessible and engaging. Each chapter also offers essential background knowledge and historical perspective and includes reflective activities to help you develop a critical approach, enabling you to argue your own point of view with confidence and consider where issues may progress to in the future. It examines core issues such as: Class and educational choice Learning styles Testing and assessment What counts as knowledge Leadership and professionalism Education students and those in education settings often struggle to see the value of theory. Doing Theory on Education: Using Popular Culture to Explore Key Debates is an accessible text designed for educationalists who want to put theory to work as an active strategy for influencing thinking and practice.

Teaching Popular Culture

Teaching Popular Culture

Teaching Popular Culture

Teaching about the media and popular culture has been a major concern for radical educators. Yet in recent years, the hyperbolic rhetoric of "critical pedagogy" has come under attack, not only from theoretical perspectives such as feminism, anti-racism and postmodernism, but also in The Light Of Actual Classroom Experience. The Notion That Teachers Might "liberate" students through rationalistic forms of ideological critique has been increasingly questioned, not only on the grounds of its political arrogance, but also because of its ineffectiveness in practice. This book seeks to move beyond the limitations of these debates, and to explore positive alternatives. It contains a broad international range of contributions, covering practice from primary schools right through to higher education. The authors draw on diverse perspectives, including poststructuralism, postmodernism, cultural studies, anti-racism and feminism; yet they share a willingness to challenge radical orthodoxies, and to offer positive practical alternatives.

Teaching Peace Through Popular Culture

Teaching Peace Through Popular Culture

Teaching Peace Through Popular Culture

Authored by scholars from a variety of disciplines, including English, Theology, Philosophy, Communications, Sociology, Humanities and Peace Studies, this edited volume provides detailed descriptions of the many ways popular culture can be used to teach peace. Chapters discuss documentary and feature film, music, television, literature and more, providing both educators and the general public with a timely and useful tool. From popular dystopian novels like The Hunger Games to feature films like The Matrix to modern rap and hiphop music, contributors not only provide critical analysis of the violence in popular culture but also an assessment of how the same or alternate forms can be used by peace educators. Additionally, each chapter project synopses and teaching ideas, as well as recommended resources.

Disturbing Pleasures

Disturbing Pleasures

Disturbing Pleasures

In Disturbing Pleasures Henry Giroux demonstrates how his well-known theories of education, critical pedagogy and popular culture can be put to use in the classroom and in other cultural settings. Adding an entirely new dimension to his thinking about the cultural sites at which pedagogical practice takes place, Giroux illustrates how professors, school teachers and other cultural workers can appropriate what he refers to as a "pedagogy of cultural studies."

Literacy and Popular Culture

Literacy and Popular Culture

Literacy and Popular Culture

Most children engage with a range of popular cultural forms outside of school. Their experiences with film, television, computer games and other cultural texts are very motivating, but often find no place within the official curriculum, where children are usually restricted to conventional forms of literacy. This book demonstrates how to use children's interests in popular culture to develop literacy in the primary classroom. The authors provide a theoretical basis for such work through an exploration of related theory and research, drawing from the fields of education, sociology and cultural studies. Teachers are often concerned about issues of sexism, racism, violence and commercialism within the disco

Popular Culture Educational Discourse and Mathematics

Popular Culture  Educational Discourse  and Mathematics

Popular Culture Educational Discourse and Mathematics

This ground-breaking book analyzes contemporary education discourse in the light of curriculum politics and popular culture, using sources ranging from academic scholarship to popular magazines, music video, film and television game shows. Mathematics is used as an “extreme case,” since it is a discipline so easily accepted as separable from politics, ethics or the social construction of knowledge. Appelbaum’s juxtaposition of popular culture, public debate and professional practice enables an examination of the production and mediation of “common sense” distinctions between school mathematics and the world outside of schools. Terrain ordinarily displaced or excluded by traditional education literature becomes the pendulum for a new conversation which merges research and practice while discarding pre-conceived categories of understanding The book also serves as an entertaining introduction to emerging theories in cultural studies, progressively illustrating the uses of discourse analysis for comprehending ideology, the implications of power/knowledge links, professional practice as a technology of power, and curriculum as at once commodities and cultural resources. In this way, Appelbaum effectively reveals a direction for teachers, students and researchers to cooperatively form a community attentive to the politics of curriculum and popular culture