Energy and US Foreign Policy

Energy and US Foreign Policy

Energy and US Foreign Policy

The quest for oil can be seen as a defining principle of global US foreign policy, an imperative which has shaped and redefined the practice of American diplomacy, especially in the wake of 9/11, which raised questions about the stability of global oil resources. In "Energy and US Foreign Policy", Ahmed Mahdi relates the military expansion of the world's biggest superpower to its quest to gain guaranteed and secure access to the world's most important commodity. Examining the foreign policy of George Bush Sr., Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, culminating in the unprecedented military campaigns of the latter, Mahdi demonstrates how and why oil has played a central role in US relations with the wider world. By dissecting the failures of the US to secure its own economic and energy interests, and by demonstrating the devastating impact this has had on the rest of the world, especially in the Middle East, Mahdi offers vital analysis for researchers and students of International Relations, Diplomacy, Security and Energy Studies.

Oil Illiberalism and War

Oil  Illiberalism  and War

Oil Illiberalism and War

An argument that America's addiction to crude oil has driven a foreign policy of intervention and exploitation hidden behind a facade of liberal internationalism. The United States is addicted to crude oil. In this book, Andrew Price-Smith argues that this addiction has distorted the conduct of American foreign policy in profound and malign ways, resulting in interventionism, exploitation, and other illiberal behaviors that hide behind a facade of liberal internationalism. The symbiotic relationship between the state and the oil industry has produced deviations from rational foreign energy policy, including interventions in Iraq and elsewhere that have been (at the very least) counterproductive or (at worst) completely antithetical to national interests. Liberal internationalism casts the United States as a benign hegemon, guaranteeing security to its allies during the Cold War and helping to establish collaborative international institutions. Price-Smith argues for a reformulation of liberal internationalism (which he terms shadow liberalism) that takes into account the dark side of American foreign policy. Price-Smith contends that the “free market” in international oil is largely a myth, rendered problematic by energy statism and the rise of national oil companies. He illustrates the destabilizing effect of oil in the Persian Gulf, and describes the United States' grand energy strategy, particularly in the Persian Gulf, as illiberal at its core, focused on the projection of power and on periodic bouts of violence. Washington's perennial oscillation between liberal phases of institution building and provision of public goods and illiberal bellicosity, Price-Smith argues, represents the shadow liberalism that is at the core of US foreign policy.

The Energy crisis and U S Foreign Policy

The Energy  crisis  and U S  Foreign Policy

The Energy crisis and U S Foreign Policy

FROST (copy 2): From the John Holmes Library collection.

U S Foreign Policy

U S  Foreign Policy

U S Foreign Policy

Looks at human rights policy, arms sales, the Middle East, international trade, China, oil imports, Africa, nuclear proliferation, and monetary policy

The Environment International Relations and U S Foreign Policy

The Environment  International Relations  and U S  Foreign Policy

The Environment International Relations and U S Foreign Policy

As the world's largest polluter and its wealthiest country, the United States has a potentially enormous impact on international efforts to protect the environment. In this innovative and thought-provoking book, an international group of scholars examines how U.S. foreign policy affects and is affected by global environmental change. Covering three broad areas—national security and geopolitics, domestic and international politics, and national interests and international obligations—the contributors examine a host of key issues, including ozone depletion and climate change, biodiversity and whale hunting, environmental and energy security, and international trade. They also raise moral issues associated with the United States's obligations to the rest of humanity. Because the environment has become an ever-more pressing issue at the diplomatic level, this book is essential, timely reading for policymakers, activists, and anyone interested in environmental change and international relations.

Russian Foreign Policy

Russian Foreign Policy

Russian Foreign Policy

This thoughtful and balanced text examines the development of Russian foreign policy since the end of the Cold War. Jeffrey Mankoff argues that Russia's more assertive behavior since Vladimir Putin became president in 2000 has resulted from both a deep-seated consensus among its elite about Russia's identity and interests as well as a favorable convergence of events-including the persistence of high energy prices and the check on U.S. power resulting from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Because these factors are the result of long-term trends, the author argues that there is little reason to.