Fiction Readers Emergent Library Bound Collection

Fiction Readers   Emergent  Library Bound Collection

Fiction Readers Emergent Library Bound Collection

Young readers will dive deep into their imaginations while reading the library bound books in this collection. With 15 great stories to choose from, this collection will help supplement your reading program and build your classroom library. These colorful books contain high-interest text, vibrant illustrations and images, age-appropriate text features, and increasingly complex vocabulary. The titles in this collection include: Duck Pond Fun (library bound); Carousel Colors (library bound); Seb's Train (library bound); When I Grow Up (library bound); Playground Friends (library bound); Maddy's Mad Hair Day (library bound); Across the Sea (library bound); Max (library bound); Grandpa and Me (library bound); Boris the Bassett (library bound); Edward the Explorer (library bound); Splash Down! (library bound); How to Be a Kitten (library bound); Zoo Hullabaloo (library bound); and Dinosaur House (library bound).

Reading and Reader Development

Reading and Reader Development

Reading and Reader Development

Reader development focuses on readers rather than reading skills. The purposes of reader development are to enhance the reading experience, to make it a more pleasurable and creative act for the reader; to increase people's confidence in their reading; and to make reading a more communal activity by bringing readers together to share their experiences. The focus of reader development is pleasure reading, which the authors interpret as reading fiction. They observe that public libraries were not at the forefront of this movement, but librarians are responding by changing library culture to focus on readers rather than books. The ways in which librarians responded and additional responses they could undertake are described within the context of the broader social movements in the United Kingdom to promote reader development. Three themes dominate the chapters. First, the authors tirelessly celebrate reading. Reading is good. Reading will make one happy. Reading elevates. The second theme is opportunism. If society is paying attention to reading, librarians should get on board and seize the opportunity to build their status and to secure the place of libraries as critically important institutions. The third theme is social inclusiveness. Librarians should always keep in mind the political dimensions of public library service and assure that all sectors of the populations share in the benefits of library service. Readers in search of guidance concerning what librarians should do will find plenty of that here. (EDITOR).

REFORMA Newsletter

REFORMA Newsletter

REFORMA Newsletter


Bean Soup

Bean Soup

Bean Soup

What ingredients are needed to make a nourishing bean soup? Appealing text and illustrations will draw emergent readers into the story. Pairs with the nonfiction title Let's Look at Beans.

Grandpa s Photos

Grandpa s Photos

Grandpa s Photos

Grandpa shares his photos and his memories with his young grandson in this heartwarming story. Appealing illustrations and leveled text will engage emergent readers. Pairs with the nonfiction title Communities Then and Now.

Children Learning to Read Emergent and developing reading

Children Learning to Read  Emergent and developing reading

Children Learning to Read Emergent and developing reading

This is the first of a two-volume publication which provides an international perspective on how children learn to read. Research studies and classroom experiences from around the world are reported, highlighting implications for the design implementation and evaluation of classroom reading programmes. Contributions and evidence is drawn from over 18 countries and, despite the national differences, there are many common concerns and controversies. From these, three areas are identified: the first is developing an improved understanding of the nature of children's early reading development; the second is the consideration of the ways in which children's reading can be encouraged; and finally issues of assessment in the context of accountability are addressed. This volume deals with the first of these concerns.

Becoming a Teacher of Reading

Becoming a Teacher of Reading

Becoming a Teacher of Reading

For Introduction to Reading and Beginning Reading courses. This developmentally organized, constructivist reading methods book places the reader squarely in today's reading classroom, grounding theoretical discussion with self-regulating pedagogy and providing a wealth of actual classroom examples and activities. The result is a polished, engaging book that will quickly instill in future teachers the joy of helping children learn to read and read to learn. KEY TOPICS: Follows children's literacy progress as they develop from being early readers to being interpretive readers to being independent, critically thinking readers. It weaves together a discussion of skills, strategies, and assessment procedures, and connects ideas to Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. Developmental organization reflects the way children's literacy evolves--divides coverage into Early Readers, Interpretive Readers, and Critical Readers, addressing key literacy topics as they affect each learning stage. MARKET: For future teachers who will teach beginning reading.

Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds

While Mom makes pumpkin soup, Ravi prepares the pumpkin seeds. Lively text and illustrations will draw in beginning readers. Pairs with the nonfiction title Let's Look at Pumpkins.

Wait Ride Walk

Wait  Ride  Walk

Wait Ride Walk

Ride the bus through the city and take in the sights! Engaging text and vibrant illustrations will draw in emergent readers. Pairs with the nonfiction title Urban Places.

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All American Boyhood

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All American Boyhood

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All American Boyhood

Gilbert Patten, writing as Burt L. Standish, made a career of generating serialized twenty-thousand-word stories featuring his fictional creation Frank Merriwell, a student athlete at Yale University who inspired others to emulate his example of manly boyhood. Patten and his publisher, Street and Smith, initially had only a general idea about what would constitute Merriwell’s adventures and who would want to read about them when they introduced the hero in the dime novel Tip Top Weekly in 1896, but over the years what took shape was a story line that capitalized on middle-class fears about the insidious influence of modern life on the nation’s boys. Merriwell came to symbolize the Progressive Era debate about how sport and school made boys into men. The saga featured the attractive Merriwell distinguishing between “good” and “bad” girls and focused on his squeaky-clean adventures in physical development and mentorship. By the serial’s conclusion, Merriwell had opened a school for “weak and wayward boys” that made him into a figure who taught readers how to approximate his example. In Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood, Anderson treats Tip Top Weekly as a historical artifact, supplementing his reading of its text, illustrations, reader letters, and advertisements with his use of editorial correspondence, memoirs, trade journals, and legal documents. Anderson blends social and cultural history, with the history of business, gender, and sport, along with a general examination of childhood and youth in this fascinating study of how a fictional character was used to promote a homogeneous “normal” American boyhood rooted in an assumed pecking order of class, race, and gender.