Flash Count Diary

Flash Count Diary

Flash Count Diary

“Many days I believe menopause is the new (if long overdue) frontier for the most compelling and necessary philosophy; Darcey Steinke is already there, blazing the way. This elegant, wise, fascinating, deeply moving book is an instant classic. I’m about to buy it for everyone I know.” —Maggie Nelson, author of The Argonauts A brave, brilliant, and unprecedented examination of menopause Menopause hit Darcey Steinke hard. First came hot flashes. Then insomnia. Then depression. As she struggled to express what was happening to her, she came up against a culture of silence. Throughout history, the natural physical transition of menopause has been viewed as something to deny, fear, and eradicate. Menstruation signals fertility and life, and childbirth is revered as the ultimate expression of womanhood. Menopause is seen as a harbinger of death. Some books Steinke found promoted hormone replacement therapy. Others encouraged acceptance. But Steinke longed to understand menopause in a more complex, spiritual, and intellectually engaged way. In Flash Count Diary, Steinke writes frankly about aspects of Menopause that have rarely been written about before. She explores the changing gender landscape that comes with reduced hormone levels, and lays bare the transformation of female desire and the realities of prejudice against older women. Weaving together her personal story with philosophy, science, art, and literature, Steinke reveals that in the seventeenth century, women who had hot flashes in front of others could be accused of being witches; that the model for Duchamp's famous Étant donnés was a post-reproductive woman; and that killer whales—one of the only other species on earth to undergo menopause—live long post-reproductive lives. Flash Count Diary, with its deep research, open play of ideas, and reverence for the female body, will change the way you think about menopause. It's a deeply feminist book—honest about the intimations of mortality that menopause brings while also arguing for the ascendancy, beauty, and power of the post-reproductive years.

Manage Your Menopause Naturally

Manage Your Menopause Naturally

Manage Your Menopause Naturally

Find Yourself Again with a Natural Approach to a Natural Transition Menopause is too often treated as a problem to be solved or an illness to be cured, not the natural process it is. World-renowned healthcare expert Maryon Stewart outlines her wonderfully comprehensive and practical Six-Week Natural Menopause Solution with steps that women can take to feel better right away. Detailed questionnaires help you assess which areas of your life most need addressing — from brain fogginess and mood swings to painful sex, weight gain, and complexion issues. Maryon then shows you exactly what to do, nutritionally and in other areas of your life, to overcome symptoms. The powerful results of Maryon’s program don’t end after six weeks; instead, they point the way toward not just a good life, but a life that’s better than ever.

Gray Matters

Gray Matters

Gray Matters

Aging is one of the most compelling issues today, with record numbers of seniors over sixty-five worldwide. Gray Matters: Finding Meaning in the Stories of Later Life examines a diverse array of cultural works including films, literature, and even art that represent this time of life, often made by people who are seniors themselves. These works, focusing on important topics such as housing, memory loss, and intimacy, are analyzed in dialogue with recent research to explore how “stories” illuminate the dynamics of growing old by blending fact with imagination. Gray Matters also incorporates the life experiences of seniors gathered from over two hundred in-depth surveys with a range of questions on growing old, not often included in other age studies works. Combining cultural texts, gerontology research, and observations from older adults will give all readers a fuller picture of the struggles and pleasures of aging and avoids over-simplified representations of the process as all negative or positive.

Love Life

Love Life

Love Life

Israel’s provocative #1 bestseller from the author of Pain. In “a hybrid–Last Tango in Paris meets Story of O . . . Shalev deconstructs sexual longing” (Darcey Steinke, author of Flash Count Diary). Hailed by The New York Times Book Review as a novel that “broke all the barriers . . . sexually explicit yet dense with biblical allusions and psychological insight,” Love Life unbuttoned Hebrew literature and spent four months as Israel’s number one bestseller. What begins as a story of a young married woman’s turbulent affair with an older man rapidly devolves into a feverish, lyrical crash course in the anatomy of obsession. When Yaara meets Aryeh, her father’s boyhood friend, she is instantly drawn to his impassive and archly assured presence. It is not long before she forsakes her devoted and well-meaning husband for the powerful, mysterious older man who seems to embody all that she lacks: will, strength, and the key to her parents’ inaccessible pasts. They embark on a heated affair that soon spirals toward the destructive as Yaara finds that the things in Aryeh that attract her also repel her with equal intensity. With shocking immediacy, Shalev lays bare Yaara’s struggle to navigate extreme terrain ranging from the sublime to the grotesque, the sacred to the profane, the liberating to the all-consuming. Love Life is cerebral, seductive, provocative, and profound. “Shalev . . . outdoes Erica Jong with outrageously sensuous, often humiliating situations described by a narrator who acts as if she has lost her sanity while commenting wryly, even perceptively, on her own misdeeds.”—Publishers Weekly “Love Life is a lucid feverish dream . . . disturbingly brilliant.”—Tubantia (Holland)

Branwell

Branwell

Branwell

For readers of Michael Cunningham's The Hours and Madeline Miller's Song of Achilles, this genre-bending exploration of the tragic figure of Branwell Brontë and the dismal, dazzling landscape that inspired his sisters to greatness is now available in a new edition with an introduction by Darcey Steinke. Branwell Brontë--brother of Charlotte, Emily, and Anne—has a childhood marked by tragedy and the weight of expectations. After the early deaths of his mother and a beloved older sister, he is kept away from school and tutored at home by his father, a curate, who rests all his ambitions for his children on his only son. Branwell grows up isolated in his family’s parsonage on the moors, learning Latin and Greek, being trained in painting, and collaborating on endless stories and poems with his sisters. Yet while his sisters go on to write Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, and Agnes Grey, Branwell wanders from job to job, growing increasingly dependent on alcohol and opium and failing to become a great poet or artist. With rich, suggestive sentences “perfectly fitted to this famously imaginative, headstrong family” (Publishers Weekly), Branwell is a portrait of childhood dreams, thwarted desire, the confinements of gender—and an homage to the landscape and milieu that inspired some of the most revolutionary works of English literature.

Counting Calories Multiplies Blessings Food Diary Journal Planner

Counting Calories Multiplies Blessings  Food Diary Journal   Planner

Counting Calories Multiplies Blessings Food Diary Journal Planner

Why should you spend some time counting calories when you can just go ahead and eat? You do that because you want to eat without the guilt. Food can either kill you or make you stronger so it's very important that you know when it can do one thing or the other to your body. Planning ahead helps you decide the calories, proteins and carbs that you eat.

A Drummer boy s Diary

A Drummer boy s Diary

A Drummer boy s Diary