Food and Architecture

Food and Architecture

Food and Architecture

Food and architecture, the two pillars of human civilization, have intertwined to such extents to sustain the civilization itself, that the connection between the two has visually ceased to exist. The apparent diverse fields of human life have worked upon similar principles through ages from the beginning of mankind and they complemented our existence. Food is fundamental to cross-cultural studies of behavior, thought, and imagery. We eat for many reasons than just to satisfy our appetite. The act of eating is now a way of socializing with others. Hence all major institutes of food service are trying hard to amaze their users with a built environment that complements the served delicacy. Although most of the users might not understand the thought consciously but subconscious mind keeps alarming when things don’t fall in place. The book surfs through all the aspects of such two diverse fields and tries to show a parallel through a very socialistic and holistic perspective. It’s interesting to understand the intangible logics behind the very tangible aspects of human life.

Food and Architecture

Food and Architecture

Food and Architecture

Food and Architecture is the first book to explore the relationship between these two fields of study and practice. Bringing together leading voices from both food studies and architecture, it provides a ground-breaking, cross-disciplinary analysis of two disciplines which both rely on a combination of creativity, intuition, taste, and science but have rarely been engaged in direct dialogue. Each of the four sections – Regionalism, Sustainability, Craft, and Authenticity – focuses on a core area of overlap between food and architecture. Structured around a series of 'conversations' between chefs, culinary historians and architects, each theme is explored through a variety of case studies, ranging from pig slaughtering and farmhouses in Greece to authenticity and heritage in American cuisine. Drawing on a range of approaches from both disciplines, methodologies include practice-based research, literary analysis, memoir, and narrative. The end of each section features a commentary by Samantha Martin-McAuliffe which emphasizes key themes and connections. This compelling book is invaluable reading for students and scholars in food studies and architecture as well as practicing chefs and architects.

Eating Architecture

Eating Architecture

Eating Architecture

A highly original collection of essays that explore the relationship between food and architecture - the preparation of meals and the production of space.

Food Architecture

Food   Architecture

Food Architecture

Much of the built world is designed around food; for storing, producing, transporting, selling, serving and eating. We recognise the regeneration of a neighbourhood through its new cafes, restaurants and grocery shops. This title features new restaurants in London, New York, Sydney and Tokyo; the design of markets; provocative essays by architects, historians, and social scientists; and interviews with designers and entrepreneurs.

The Food Axis

The Food Axis

The Food Axis

Blending architectural and social history with the necessity—and the passion—for food, this engaging new book attempts to understand the development of the American house by viewing it through one very specific lens: the food axis. Taking in far more than the kitchen, author Elizabeth Collins Cromley explores all areas of food management within the home—preparation, cooking, consumption, and disposal. Her food axis implies a network of related spaces above and below ground, both attached to the house and separate from it. Studying the use and interaction of these spaces, and the ways in which their components change (often radically) over time, the author shows how these elements have helped shape the multiple forms of residential architecture in the United States, from the first settlement period to the present. Beginning with the earliest—and relatively simple—houses, Cromley traces changes in food spaces through the years, noting a steady escalation in the number of food-related rooms. Along the way, she considers multiple circumstances that shed light on this evolution, including the role of gender in determining food-space design, the relation of food spaces to nature, and the telling ways in which people and food circulate through kitchens and dining rooms. Because Cromley is interested not only in how designed spaces look but how they are used, she cites a wealth of primary sources—autobiographies, travel journals, household diaries, letters, inventories—in her exploration of the habits surrounding all aspects of food in the home. In addition to designers, preservationists, and architectural historians, this book will interest curious cooks as well as home-dwellers who want to better understand the spaces they inhabit.

Food City

Food City

Food City

In Food City, a companion piece to Smartcities and Eco-Warriors, innovative architect and urban designer CJ Lim explores the issue of urban transformation and how the creation, storage and distribution of food has been and can again become a construct for the practice of everyday life. Food City investigates the reinstatement of food at the core of national and local governance -- how it can be a driver to restructure employment, education, transport, tax, health, culture, communities, and the justice system, re-evaluating how the city functions as a spatial and political entity. Global in scope, Food City first addresses the frameworks of over 25 international cities through the medium of food and how the city is governed. It then provides a case study through drawings, models, and text, exploring how a secondary infrastructure could function as a living environmental and food system operating as a sustainable stratum over the city of London. This case study raises serious questions about the priorities of our governing bodies, using architectural relationships to reframe the spaces of food consumption and production, analyzed through historical precedent, function and form. This study of the integration of food, architecture, and the development of future cities will both inspire and stimulate professionals and students in the fields of urban design and architecture.

Experiencing Food Designing Sustainable and Social Practices

Experiencing Food  Designing Sustainable and Social Practices

Experiencing Food Designing Sustainable and Social Practices

Experiencing Food: Designing Sustainable and Social Practices contains papers on food, sustainability and social practices research, presented at the 2nd International Conference on Food Design and Food Studies, held November 28-30, 2019, at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. The conference and resulting papers reflect on interdisciplinarity as not limited to the design of objects or services, but seeking awareness towards new lifestyles and innovative approaches to food sustainability.