From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From the diplomat Putin wants to interrogate—and has banned from Russia—a revelatory, inside account of U.S.-Russia relations from 1989 to the present “A fascinating and timely account of the current crisis in the relationship between Russia and the United States.” —New York Times Book Review Putin would need an enemy, and he turned to the most reliable one in Russia’s recent history: the United States and then, by extension, me. In 2008, when Michael McFaul was asked to leave his perch at Stanford and join an unlikely presidential campaign, he had no idea that he would find himself at the beating heart of one of today’s most contentious and consequential international relationships. As President Barack Obama’s adviser on Russian affairs, McFaul helped craft the United States’ policy known as “reset” that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. And then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012 to 2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting, hopeful moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency. This riveting inside account combines history and memoir to tell the full story of U.S.-Russia relations from the fall of the Soviet Union to the new rise of the hostile, paranoid Russian president. From the first days of McFaul’s ambassadorship, the Kremlin actively sought to discredit and undermine him, hassling him with tactics that included dispatching protesters to his front gates, slandering him on state media, and tightly surveilling him, his staff, and his family. From Cold War to Hot Peace is an essential account of the most consequential global confrontation of our time.

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia by Michael McFaul | Conversation Starters “From Cold War to Hot Peace” is an intimate account of the relations between Russia and the U.S. from 1989 to the present day. It was written by Michael McFaul, who was ambassador to Russia during Obama’s presidency. In it, he argues that by 2010 everything indicated that American-Russian relations were improving because Presidents Obama and Medvedev had reached an agreement dealing with the reduction of nuclear weapons. But the optimism ended when Putin returned to the presidency. McFaul wonders why American-Russian relations reached the extent of the Cold War almost overnight. “From Cold War to Hot Peace” has been described by readers such as Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice as an essential read for understanding America’s most meaningful relationships, and as an invaluable contribution. A Brief Look Inside: EVERY GOOD BOOK CONTAINS A WORLD FAR DEEPER than the surface of its pages. The characters and their world come alive, and the characters and its world still live on. Conversation Starters is peppered with questions designed to bring us beneath the surface of the page and invite us into the world that lives on. These questions can be used to.. Create Hours of Conversation: • Foster a deeper understanding of the book • Promote an atmosphere of discussion for groups • Assist in the study of the book, either individually or corporately • Explore unseen realms of the book as never seen before.

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

From Cold War to Hot Peace

SCOTT (copy 1): From the John Holmes Library Collection.

In the Shadow of International Law

In the Shadow of International Law

In the Shadow of International Law

"This book investigates one of the most controversial forms of secret statecraft in international politics: the use of covert action to overthrow foreign regimes. The central question it asks is why leaders sometimes turn to the so-called quiet option when conducting regime change rather than using overt means. Whereas existing works prioritize the desire to control escalation or avoid domestic-political constraints to explain this variation, this book highlights the surprising role that international law plays in these decisions. When states cannot locate a legal exemption from the nonintervention principle- the prohibition on unwanted violations of another state's sovereignty, codified in the United Nations Charter and elsewhere-they are more likely to opt for covert action. Concealing brazen violations of nonintervention helps states evade hypocrisy costs and avoid damaging their credibility. These claims are tested against four regime change operations carried out by the United States in Latin America during the Cold War using declassified government documents, interviews with former government officials, and historical accounts. The theory and findings presented in this book expose the secret underpinnings of the liberal international order and speak to longstanding debates about the conduct of foreign-imposed regime change as well as the impact of international law on state behavior. This book also has important policy implications, including what might follow if America abandons its role as the steward of the postwar order as well as the promise and peril of promoting new rules and norms in cyberspace"--

The Return of Great Power Rivalry

The Return of Great Power Rivalry

The Return of Great Power Rivalry

The United States of America has been the most powerful country in the world for over seventy years, but recently the U.S. National Security Strategy declared that the return of great power competition with Russia and China is the greatest threat to U.S. national security. Further, many analysts predict that America's autocratic rivals will have at least some success in disrupting-and, in the longer term, possibly even displacing-U.S. global leadership. Brilliant and engagingly written, The Return of Great Power Rivalry argues that this conventional wisdom is wrong. Drawing on an extraordinary range of historical evidence and the works of figures like Herodotus, Machiavelli, and Montesquieu and combining it with cutting-edge social science research, Matthew Kroenig advances the riveting argument that democracies tend to excel in great power rivalries. He contends that democracies actually have unique economic, diplomatic, and military advantages in long-run geopolitical competitions. He considers autocratic advantages as well, but shows that these are more than outweighed by their vulnerabilities.Kroenig then shows these arguments through the seven most important cases of democratic-versus-autocratic rivalries throughout history, from the ancient world to the Cold War. Finally, he analyzes the new era of great power rivalry among the United States, Russia, and China through the lens of the democratic advantage argument. By advancing a "hard-power" argument for democracy, Kroenig demonstrates that despite its many problems, the U.S. is better positioned to maintain a global leadership role than either Russia or China. A vitally important book for anyone concerned about the future of global geopolitics, The Return of Great Power Rivalry provides both an innovative way of thinking about power in international politics and an optimistic assessment of the future of American global leadership.

Africa

Africa

Africa


Insight

Insight

Insight


The UN Security Council and Informal Groups of States

The UN Security Council and Informal Groups of States

The UN Security Council and Informal Groups of States

This book provides the first comparative treatment of the roles of informal ad hoc groupings of states within selected conflict settings and their effects on governance in and out of the UN Security Council.Since the 1990s, informal institutions such as groups of friends, and contact or core groups have proliferated as instruments for the management of risk and conflict due to the increasing demands on the UN Security Council to adapt to the new post-cold war security environment. The perception of both the capacity and limits of the Security Council has had a catalytic effect on the creation of these ad hoc mechanisms. The substance of conflict resolution and the process of itslegitimation tend to become increasingly detached, with the former being delegated to informal groups or coalition of states, while the Security Council provides the latter. The successful merger of right process and substantive outcome may strengthen the legitimacy of the Council and make actions taken by informalinstitutions more acceptable.This book seeks to establish the importance of informal ad hoc groupings of states in the making of peace. The dynamics between informal institutions and the Security Council are closely examined in the context of conflict resolution in Namibia, El Salvador, and Kosovo. The study illustrates the changing role of the Council in the maintenance of international peace and security. The decentralization of tasks to informal groups allows the achievement of policy goals that would beunattainable in the centralized setting of formal international organizations. In effect, informal institutions are agents of incremental change.