From Craftsmen to Capitalists

From Craftsmen to Capitalists

From Craftsmen to Capitalists

Politically adrift, alienated from Weimar society, and fearful of competition from industrial elites and the working class alike, the independent artisans of interwar Germany were a particularly receptive audience for National Socialist ideology. As Hitler consolidated power, they emerged as an important Nazi constituency, drawn by the party’s rejection of both capitalism and Bolshevism. Yet, in the years after 1945, the artisan class became one of the pillars of postwar stability, thoroughly integrated into German society. From Craftsmen to Capitalists gives the first account of this astonishing transformation, exploring how skilled tradesmen recast their historical traditions and forged alliances with former antagonists to help realize German democratization and recovery.

Handicraftsmen and Capitalists their organisation at home and abroad Republished from the Times with a preface by Mr Herries Creed a sketch of English iron works and an appendix Illustrated by a map of the coal fields of Belgium

Handicraftsmen and Capitalists  their organisation at home and abroad     Republished from the    Times     with a preface by Mr  Herries Creed  a sketch of English iron works  and an appendix  Illustrated by a map of the coal fields of Belgium

Handicraftsmen and Capitalists their organisation at home and abroad Republished from the Times with a preface by Mr Herries Creed a sketch of English iron works and an appendix Illustrated by a map of the coal fields of Belgium


Hometown Hamburg

Hometown Hamburg

Hometown Hamburg

Through the study of Hamburg handicraft in the late Weimar Republic ‘Hometown Hamburg’ addresses three intertwined problems in modern German history: the role of institutionalized social, political and cultural continuity versus contingency in the course of modern German development; the impact of conflicting notions of social order on the survival of liberal democracy; and the role of corporate politics in the rise of National Socialism.

The Roots of Rural Capitalism

The Roots of Rural Capitalism

The Roots of Rural Capitalism

Between the late colonial period and the Civil War, the countryside of the American northeast was largely transformed. Rural New England changed from a society of independent farmers relatively isolated from international markets into a capitalist economy closely linked to the national market, an economy in which much farming and manufacturing output was produced by wage labor. Using the Connecticut Valley as an example, The Roots of Rural Capitalism demonstrates how this important change came about. Christopher Clark joins the active debate on the "transition to capitalism" with a fresh interpretation that integrates the insights of previous studies with the results of his detailed research. Largely rejecting the assumption of recent scholars that economic change can be explained principally in terms of markets, he constructs a broader social history of the rural economy and traces the complex interactions of social structure, household strategies, gender relations, and cultural values that propelled the countryside from one economic system to another. Above all, he shows that people of rural Massachusetts were not passive victims of changes forced upon them, but actively created a new economic world as they tried to secure their livelihoods under changing demographic and economic circumstances. The emergence of rural capitalism, Clark maintains, was not the result of a single "transition"; rather, it was an accretion of new institutions and practices that occurred over two generations, and in two broad chronological phases. It is his singular contribution to demonstrate the coexistence of a family-based household economy (persisting well into the nineteenth century) and the market-oriented system of production and exchange that is generally held to have emerged full-blown by the eighteenth century. He is adept at describing the clash of values sustaining both economies, and the ways in which the rural household-based economy, through a process he calls "involution," ultimately gave way to a new order. His analysis of the distinctive role of rural women in this transition constitutes a strong new element in the study of gender as a factor in the economic, social, and cultural shifts of the period. Sophisticated in argument and engaging in presentation, this book will be recognized as a major contribution to the history of capitalism and society in nineteenth-century America.

John Locke and Agrarian Capitalism

John Locke and Agrarian Capitalism

John Locke and Agrarian Capitalism

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1984.

Labor Immigration Under Capitalism

Labor Immigration Under Capitalism

Labor Immigration Under Capitalism

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1984.

The Capitalist System

The Capitalist System

The Capitalist System


Chants Democratic

Chants Democratic

Chants Democratic

Examines the impact of the development of a working class on the society, culture, and politics of New York