From Notes to Narrative

From Notes to Narrative

From Notes to Narrative

Ethnography centers on the culture of everyday life. So it is ironic that most scholars who do research on the intimate experiences of ordinary people write their books in a style that those people cannot understand. In recent years, the ethnographic method has spread from its original home in cultural anthropology to fields such as sociology, marketing, media studies, law, criminology, education, cultural studies, history, geography, and political science. Yet, while more and more students and practitioners are learning how to write ethnographies, there is little or no training on how to write ethnographies well. From Notes to Narrative picks up where methodological training leaves off. Kristen Ghodsee, an award-winning ethnographer, addresses common issues that arise in ethnographic writing. Ghodsee works through sentence-level details, such as word choice and structure. She also tackles bigger-picture elements, such as how to incorporate theory and ethnographic details, how to effectively deploy dialogue, and how to avoid distracting elements such as long block quotations and in-text citations. She includes excerpts and examples from model ethnographies. The book concludes with a bibliography of other useful writing guides and nearly one hundred examples of eminently readable ethnographic books.

Notes for a Rescue Narrative

Notes for a Rescue Narrative

Notes for a Rescue Narrative

Story rescues no one from death, but out of the seams and lacunae of narrative a certain kind of lyric can emerge. In Notes for a Rescue Narrative, J. Mark Smith charts the oxbow turnings of diverse human voices through scepticism and belief, hope and despair, pride and humility. Inspired by the elegiac plainness of Wordsworth as much as by the many-mindedness of Pound, Smith's poems probe into regions of experience where meaning falls away, and "the names hardly stick." A middle-aged British sailor remembers, decades afterwards, a strange "human-and-not-human" incident in the colonial port of Bombay. A man walking his dog near the Katyn monument in Toronto wonders at signs, and at the "mother-deep" ocean of human suffering. In a moment "out of an airport," the speakers and story-tellers of the Mackenzie River regroup and ready themselves, not for a rescue, but for the future. Blue jays in the pine forests of the Great Basin turn through a death-dance of forgetfulness and fecundity. A traveller on a snow-bound plane straightens his spine to bear the difficult reality of an unstoried present. A man buries his long-dead father"s alpine equipment beneath a mountain in California, and finds a new welcome in the familiar "noise of chaos." Notes for a Rescue Narrative moves deftly between metrical and free verse forms, and includes homages to Horace, Eugenio Montale, and Antonio Machado.

FROM KNOWLEDGE TO NARRATIVE PB

FROM KNOWLEDGE TO NARRATIVE PB

FROM KNOWLEDGE TO NARRATIVE PB

Using an exhibition on the naturalist Carolus Linneaus at the Chicago Botanic Garden as a springboard for a comprehensive discussion of the history and philosophy of museum education, Lisa Roberts describes museum educator's activist role in effecting fundamental changes to exhibit planning and development. Challenging a traditional, scholarly presentation of objects, educators argue that, rather than transmitting knowledge, museum displays should construct narratives that are determined as much by what is meaningful to visitors as by what curators intend.