How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

"Mr. Hamid reaffirms his place as one of his generation's most inventive and gifted writers." –Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "A globalized version of The Great Gatsby . . . [Hamid's] book is nearly that good." –Alan Cheuse, NPR "Marvelous and moving." –TIME Magazine From the internationally bestselling author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Exit West, the boldly imagined tale of a poor boy’s quest for wealth and love His first two novels established Mohsin Hamid as a radically inventive storyteller with his finger on the world’s pulse. How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia meets that reputation—and exceeds it. The astonishing and riveting tale of a man’s journey from impoverished rural boy to corporate tycoon, it steals its shape from the business self-help books devoured by ambitious youths all over “rising Asia.” It follows its nameless hero to the sprawling metropolis where he begins to amass an empire built on that most fluid, and increasingly scarce, of goods: water. Yet his heart remains set on something else, on the pretty girl whose star rises along with his, their paths crossing and recrossing, a lifelong affair sparked and snuffed and sparked again by the forces that careen their fates along. How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia is a striking slice of contemporary life at a time of crushing upheaval. Romantic without being sentimental, political without being didactic, and spiritual without being religious, it brings an unflinching gaze to the violence and hope it depicts. And it creates two unforgettable characters who find moments of transcendent intimacy in the midst of shattering change.

The Journey to Radical Love in Shafak s The Forty Rules Of Love Hamid s How to Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia and Mahfouz s Arabian Nights And Days

The Journey to Radical Love in Shafak s The Forty Rules Of Love  Hamid s How to Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia  and Mahfouz s Arabian Nights And Days

The Journey to Radical Love in Shafak s The Forty Rules Of Love Hamid s How to Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia and Mahfouz s Arabian Nights And Days

This thesis explores the idea that the influences of Sufism and the poetry of Rumi in contemporary literature challenge perspectives concerning the Islamic representation in the world today by specifically urging for a universal and borderless love between Eastern and Western cultures. Despite being older forms of teaching, the philosophy of Sufism and the poetry of Rumi are still beneficial and relatable to the modern world, essentially urging individuals to find radical love within themselves and, in turn, to find unity with humanity. This radical Love is a transforming force, offering spiritual rebirth, as it surpasses labels, borders, economic globalization, and political corruption as evident in the novels discussed in this thesis. This thesis explores the relationship of Rumi and Sufism to the universe and the individual journey to love by specifically analyzing the journeys of the characters in Elif Shafak's The Forty Rules of Love, Mohsin Hamid's How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, and Naguib Mahfouz's Arabian Nights and Days.

Exit West

Exit West

Exit West

An extraordinary story of love and hope from the bestselling, Man Booker-shortlisted author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist. This is Nadia. She is fiercely independent with an excellent sense of humour and a love of smoking alone on her balcony late at night. This is Saeed. He is sweet and shy and kind to strangers. He also has a balcony but he uses his for stargazing. This is their story: a love story, but also a story about how we live now and how we might live tomorrow. Saeed and Nadia are falling in love, and their city is falling apart. Here is a world in crisis and two human beings travelling through it. Exit West is a heartfelt and radical act of hope-a novel to restore your faith in humanity and in the power of imagination.

Discontent and its Civilizations

Discontent and its Civilizations

Discontent and its Civilizations

From the bestselling author of How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, and Exit West, coming in March 2017, “a near-perfect essay collection, filled with insight, compassion, and intellect." (NPR) Mohsin Hamid’s brilliant, moving, and extraordinarily clever novels have not only made him an international bestseller, they have earned him a reputation as a “master critic of the modern global condition” (Foreign Policy). His stories are at once timeless and of-the-moment, and his themes are universal: love, language, ambition, power, corruption, religion, family, identity. Here he explores this terrain from a different angle in essays that deftly counterpoise the personal and the political, and are shot through with the same passion, imagination, and breathtaking shifts of perspective that gives his fiction its unmistakable electric charge. A “water lily” who has called three countries on three continents his home—Pakistan, the birthplace to which he returned as a young father; the United States, where he spent his childhood and young adulthood; and Britain, where he married and became a citizen—Hamid writes about overlapping worlds with fluidity and penetrating insight. Whether he is discussing courtship rituals or pop culture, drones or the rhythms of daily life in an extended family compound, he transports us beyond the scarifying headlines of an anxious West and a volatile East, beyond stereotype and assumption, and helps to bring a dazzling diverse global culture within emotional and intellectual reach.

Moth Smoke

Moth Smoke

Moth Smoke

Moth Smoke is the first novel by Mohsin Hamid, author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist 'You know you're in trouble when you can't meet a woman's eye, particularly if the woman happens to be your best friend's wife.' In Lahore, Daru Shezad is a junior banker with a hashish habit. When his old friend Ozi moves back to Pakistan, Daru wants to be happy for him. Ozi has everything: a beautiful wife and child, an expensive foreign education - and a corrupt father who bankrolls his lavish lifestyle. As jealousy sets in, Daru's life slowly unravels. He loses his job. Starts lacing his joints with heroin. Becomes involved with a criminally-minded rickshaw driver. And falls in love with Ozi's lonely wife. But how low can Daru sink? Is he guilty of the crime he finds himself on trial for? 'A vivid portrait of contemporary young Pakistani life, where frustration and insecurity feed not only the snobbery, decadence and aspirations of the rich, but also the resentment of the poor'The Times 'Fast-paced, intelligent . . . pulls us, despite ourselves, into its spiralling wake'New Yorker 'A subtly audacious . . .prodigious descendant of hard-boiled lit and film noir. A steamy and often darkly amusing book about sex, drugs, and class warfare in postcolonial Asia' Village Voice 'Stunning, a hip page-turner' Los Angeles Times 'Sharply observed, powerful, evocative' Financial Times 'A novel of remarkable wit, poise, profundity, and strangeness. A treat'Esquire Mohsin Hamid is the author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Moth Smoke and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia. His fiction has been translated into over 30 languages, received numerous awards, and been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. He has contributed essays and short stories to publications such as the Guardian, The New York Times, Financial Times, Granta, and Paris Review. Born and mostly raised in Lahore, he spent part of his childhood in California, studied at Princeton University and Harvard Law School, and has since lived between Lahore, London, and New York.

Disillusionment and Alienation in Hamid s selected works

Disillusionment and Alienation in Hamid s selected works

Disillusionment and Alienation in Hamid s selected works

Examination Thesis from the year 2014 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: A, , course: M.A. ENGLISH, language: English, abstract: The present research aims at exploring the themes of disillusionment and alienation with regard to the construction of identity in two postcolonial novels by Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid’s Moth Smoke (MS, 2000) and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (HGFRRA, 2013) taking theoretical insights from the works of Karl Marx (1883), Homi K. Bhabha (1994) and others. A common thread running through these novels is the juxtapositioning of estrangement and alienation while fighting for the basic right of getting prospects to thrive in life. How the cultural and identity conflicts in developing Asia emerged as the reason for personal estrangement of characters from reality; how the protagonists were found to be fragmented and how they used underhand ways to get rich is explored in Hamid’s selected works.

Mohsin Hamid Precarity and the Re Education of Western Audiences in Post 9 11 West Asian Literature

Mohsin Hamid  Precarity  and the  Re Education of Western Audiences in Post 9 11 West Asian Literature

Mohsin Hamid Precarity and the Re Education of Western Audiences in Post 9 11 West Asian Literature

This thesis explores the idea that the theory of precarity, as found throughout Judith Butler's post-9/11 essays, makes a useful tool and criticism in analyzing Mohsin Hamid's post-9/11 work to discover that one of the messages of Hamid is the re-education of Western audiences. Beginning with a general discussion of precarity and its prime culprit, neoliberalism, the thesis explores three of Hamid's post-9/11 works: The Reluctant Fundamentalist, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, and Discontent and its Civilizations: Dispatches from Lahore, New York, and London. In the examination of each novel, this thesis will discuss the precariousness found in West Asia, the possible explanations of this precarity that can be found in the links between precariousness and neoliberalism, and how both precarity and neoliberalism are presented by Hamid in each novel in a re-education intended for Western audiences.

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The Man Booker-shortlisted, thrillingly provocative international bestseller - adapted to a major motion picture starring Kiefer Sutherland - from the author of Exit West 'Excuse me, sir, but may I be of assistance? Ah, I see I have alarmed you. Do not be frightened by my beard. I am a lover of America . . . ' So speaks the mysterious stranger at a Lahore cafe as dusk settles. Invited to join him for tea, you learn his name and what led this speaker of immaculate English to seek you out. For he is more worldy than you might expect; better travelled and better educated. He knows the West better than you do. And as he tells you his story, of how he embraced the Western dream -- and a Western woman -- and how both betrayed him, so the night darkens. Then the true reason for your meeting becomes abundantly clear . . . Challenging, mysterious and thrillingly tense, Mohsin Hamid's masterly The Reluctant Fundamentalist is a vital read teeming with questions and ideas about some of the most pressing issues of today's globalised, fractured world.

My Year Abroad

My Year Abroad

My Year Abroad

INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER “A manifesto to happiness—the one found when you stop running from who you are.” –New York Times Book Review “An extraordinary book, acrobatic on the level of the sentence, symphonic across its many movements—and this is a book that moves…My Year Abroad is a wild ride—a caper, a romance, a bildungsroman, and something of a satire of how to get filthy rich in rising Asia.” – Vogue From the award-winning author of Native Speaker and On Such a Full Sea, an exuberant, provocative story about a young American life transformed by an unusual Asian adventure – and about the human capacities for pleasure, pain, and connection. Tiller is an average American college student with a good heart but minimal aspirations. Pong Lou is a larger-than-life, wildly creative Chinese American entrepreneur who sees something intriguing in Tiller beyond his bored exterior and takes him under his wing. When Pong brings him along on a boisterous trip across Asia, Tiller is catapulted from ordinary young man to talented protégé, and pulled into a series of ever more extreme and eye-opening experiences that transform his view of the world, of Pong, and of himself. In the breathtaking, “precise, elliptical prose” that Chang-rae Lee is known for (The New York Times), the narrative alternates between Tiller’s outlandish, mind-boggling year with Pong and the strange, riveting, emotionally complex domestic life that follows it, as Tiller processes what happened to him abroad and what it means for his future. Rich with commentary on Western attitudes, Eastern stereotypes, capitalism, global trade, mental health, parenthood, mentorship, and more, My Year Abroad is also an exploration of the surprising effects of cultural immersion—on a young American in Asia, on a Chinese man in America, and on an unlikely couple hiding out in the suburbs. Tinged at once with humor and darkness, electric with its accumulating surprises and suspense, My Year Abroad is a novel that only Chang-rae Lee could have written, and one that will be read and discussed for years to come.

Characterizing Profiles

Characterizing Profiles

Characterizing Profiles

Data profiles have come to proliferate across the private and public sectors as digitization has engendered new technologies and techniques for gathering, aggregating, and sharing data. My dissertation interrogates the epistemologies, affects, and power-relations of this increasingly ubiquitous data surveillance. I argue that, despite disavowing its own points of view and partiality, data profiling is indeed a form of storytelling. As such, the prominence of profiling critically reframes contemporary fiction and metafiction in particular, challenging literary modes of watching and representing the world. I also maintain that postmodern literature can enact its own counter-surveillance and engage the narratological and ideological foundations of profiling culture. My dissertation draws on and contributes to literary studies, the digital humanities, affect studies, surveillance studies, critical race studies, and gender studies because, ultimately, these discourses are inextricably knotted together around the problems of profiling.