How to Write About Theatre

How to Write About Theatre

How to Write About Theatre

What do you do if you find yourself weeping in the stalls? How should you react to Jude Law's trousers or David Tennant's hair? Are you prepared to receive toilet paper in the post? What if the show you just damned turns out to be a classic? If you gave it a five-star rave will anyone believe you? Drawing on his long years of experience as a national newspaper critic, Mark Fisher answers such questions with candour, wit and insight. Learning lessons from history's leading critics and taking examples from around the world, he gives practical advice about how to celebrate, analyse and discuss this most ephemeral of art forms - and how to make your writing come alive as you do so. Today, more people than ever are writing about theatre, but whether you're blogging, tweeting or writing an academic essay, your challenges as a critic remain the same: how to capture a performance in words, how to express your opinions and how to keep the reader entertained. This inspirational book shows you the way to do it. Foreword by Chris Jones, Chief theater critic, Chicago Tribune

How to Write about Theatre and Drama

How to Write about Theatre and Drama

How to Write about Theatre and Drama

Combining basic composition and critical inquiry into the discipline of theatre, HOW TO WRITE ABOUT THEATRE AND DRAMA meets the fundamental needs of beginning theatre students to learn the unique and varied forms of theatre and drama in their role in our cultural heritage. Beginning with a discussion of the theatrical review, the text covers the forms of essays used in writing about theatre, research, matters of style, structure, and vocabulary.

Writing about Theatre and Drama

Writing about Theatre and Drama

Writing about Theatre and Drama

Combining basic composition and critical inquiry into the discipline of theatre, WRITING ABOUT THEATRE AND DRAMA meets the fundamental needs of beginning theatre students to learn the unique and varied forms of theatre and drama in their role in our cultural heritage. Beginning with a discussion of the theatrical review, the text covers the forms of essays used in writing about theatre, research, matters of style, structure, and vocabulary.

Theatre for Children

Theatre for Children

Theatre for Children

A guide to producing, directing, and writing plays for children, with tips on catching and holding a child's attention

Writing about Theatre

Writing about Theatre

Writing about Theatre

In Hamlet, when the melancholy prince kills Polonius, the dramatic tension is enhanced by the audience's knowledge that Polonius lurks behind the curtain, and that Hamlet will mistake him for his detested stepfather. Though this tension is understood and appreciated by readers of the play, its dynamics of raw intensity are perhaps best understood by the interplay between performers and audience members. By addressing both enthusiasts of theater and enthusiasts of dramatic literature, Thaiss and Davis demonstrate how one's understanding of drama is enriched by critical attention to both performance and text. It specifically addresses the writing needs of a novice playwright, not in conjunction with "writing about literature," but about the play as subject in its own right. This book provides critical analysis of play texts, as well as performance reviews, theater history research, and other examples that enliven understanding and promote versatility. In its sequence of chapters, it addresses projects of increasing sophistication, from performance reviews and play analyses to theater history research and dramatic theory papers. As a general guide to good writing, this book also promotes learning and critical/creative thought. Introductory chapters cover the principles of good writing and offer strategies to help readers overcome writer's block, organize effectively and avoid common usage and style pitfalls. Anyone interested in drama and/or literature.

How To Write Awesome Dialogue For Fiction Film and Theatre

How To Write Awesome Dialogue  For Fiction  Film  and Theatre

How To Write Awesome Dialogue For Fiction Film and Theatre

Rejection e-mails from agents and editors clogging your inbox? Getting the same rejection slips over and over again? It could be pacing, plot, narrative engine . . . or maybe what your characters say just isn't getting the job done. Outstanding dialogue is often the difference between a good book and a great book. How does yours stack up? With nine books published with imprints of Random House, Abrams, and Simon & Schuster, and more than twenty years of experience as an actor and director, author, writing teacher, and Bram Stoker Award Finalist Tom Leveen guides you through everything you need to improve your writing, make your dialogue shine, and get your book noticed and talked about by readers, agents, and editors alike! Learn how to start with a great plot and conflict to form the foundation of awesome dialogue Discover actors’ techniques to give your characters strength and purpose Improve on setting scenes and building relationships between characters and more! What people are saying about Tom Leveen’s dialogue, voice, and character: Party “I must say that I’m absolutely in awe of Leveen’s ability to build such distinct and totally believable voice for eleven characters [protagonists] in one novel.” ~ fortheloveofya.com Zero “Well written, with a distinct and fantastically done voice, Zero is an unflinching must read.” ~ agoodaddiction.blogspot.com “[H]is voice is fresh and strong and consistent.” ~ scratchingcat.wordpress.com “Part of what makes the book, and the voice, believable is Leveen’s ability to channel a teenage girl and make her real. It’s all there—the insecurity, the bravado, the conflicting feelings about sex, the sense that your whole life is in front of you, which is both exhilarating and paralyzing.” ~ The Phoenix New Times manicpixiedreamgirl “[I]t’s the relationships between the novel’s teenage characters that are the real standouts. Tyler’s crass banter with his buddies, his snarky but supportive relationship with his sister, and his botched dealings with both Becky and Sydney are entirely realistic.” ~ Publisher’s Weekly “Tom Leveen has a unique voice and writes interesting male characters, so I was intrigued to check out his latest book manicpixiedreamgirl. Leveen’s characters are usually creative types and not the typical leading men you see in YA. . . . I thought the male voice in manicpixiedreamgirl was very strong and unique.” ~ thereadingdate.com Random “Author Tom Leveen presents a powerful story with a plot so real, readers will be gripped from the very first page.” ~ readingjunky.blogspot.com Sick “[Leveen] really nails the ‘guy’ dialogue as well—it is gross, colorful, and at times, downright funny.” ~ VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates) “In an exciting take on the zombie novel, Leveen … shifts to horror while maintaining his trademark complex relationships and character-driven storytelling.” ~ Publisher’s Weekly “Tom Leveen’s voice is truly one of the best elements…” ~ blog.homoeoteleuton.com Shackled “The prose is tight and the dialogue lends emotion to the character’s mental state, properly complementing this plot-driven setup.” ~ School Library Journal “…impeccably written with true-to-life dialogue and characters I can relate to…” ~ literologie.com

The Collaborative Playwright

The Collaborative Playwright

The Collaborative Playwright

The interaction between the ideas of the playwright and the know-how of the dramaturg is vital to the success of any production. But not every writer is accustomed to thinking like a dramaturg. The Collaborative Playwright changes that by offering a lively dialogue between a highly successful playwright, Bruce Graham, and an equally accomplished dramaturg, Michele Volansky, supported by hands-on exercises to get you thinking and writing in new ways. The Collaborative Playwright gives you professional advice on how to get started with a play, how to structure it to be performed, and how to work with a dramaturg to turn it into a staged production. Graham and Volansky's fun, smart conversation offers step-by-step advice on each of the components of the craft - exposition, rhythms, characterization, structure, and story generation - all illustrated with clear examples from Graham's own plays. But unlike other books that advise playwrights, The Collaborative Playwright is written from two points of view: the playwright's and the dramaturg's. It's both friendly and packed with indispensable nuggets of information, including interviews with more than thirty current theatre artists whose collective advice articulates some of the more practical aspects of working in the theatre - knowledge that playwrights need as they write. Want to write plays that work as well on stage as they do in your head? Read The Collaborative Playwright, listen in as two theatre veterans discuss the crucial characteristics of good writing, and find out why, if you're writing for the theatre, it pays to listen to your dramaturg.

Read and Write Sports Readers Theatre and Writing Activities for Grades 3 8

Read and Write Sports  Readers Theatre and Writing Activities for Grades 3 8

Read and Write Sports Readers Theatre and Writing Activities for Grades 3 8

This book allows students to bring the energy of their everyday lives into the classroom via sports-based readers theatre and writing activities. • Presents ten original readers theater scripts about sports for children in elementary and middle school • Provides a sample "GO Chart" with each writing exercise so students have an example to follow • Includes a word search and a crossword puzzle with each of the ten sports, providing valuable spelling and vocabulary activities • Contains appendixes with helpful charts and black line masters for instructors

Writing Your First Play

Writing Your First Play

Writing Your First Play

The second edition of Writing Your First Play provides the beginning playwright with the tools and motivation to tell a story through dramatic form. Based on many years of teaching experience, this book breaks the action, dialogue, characters and conflict into separate exercises that lead naturally from one to another and become increasingly more sophisticated. Before the reader has realized it, simple ideas have taken on the shape of a play. Topics include understanding the role action plays in drama; developing action and conflict to reveal character; writing powerful and persuasive dialogue; writing from personal experience, and how it can be both enriching and dangerous; and knowing where to start the story and what details help to develop the storyline.