I Am the Central Park Jogger

I Am the Central Park Jogger

I Am the Central Park Jogger

A timeless, “triumphant” (Entertainment Weekly) story of healing and recovery from the victim of a crime that shocked the nation: the Central Park Jogger. Shortly after 9:00 p.m. on April 19, 1989, a young woman jogs alone near 102nd Street in New York City's Central Park. She is attacked, raped, savagely beaten, and left for dead. Hours later she arrives at the emergency room—comatose—she has lost so much blood that her doctors believe it’s a miracle she's still alive. Meet Trisha Meili, the Central Park Jogger. I Am the Central Park Jogger recounts the mesmerizing, inspiring, often wrenching story of human strength and transcendent recovery. Called “Hero of the Month” by Glamour magazine, Meili tells us who she was before the attack—a young Wall Street professional with a promising future—and who she has become: a woman who learned how to read, write, walk, talk, and love again...and turn horrifying violence and certain death into extraordinary healing and victorious life. With “moments of unexpected grace and insights into life’s challenges….Meili’s story—the story the public never knew—is unforgettable” (The Buffalo News).

Unequal Verdicts

Unequal Verdicts

Unequal Verdicts

An examination of one of the biggest rape cases in decades reconstructs the attack on the Central Park jogger; presents interviews with gang members, police, witnesses, and other victims; and discusses the trial. 25,000 first printing.

The Central Park Five

The Central Park Five

The Central Park Five

Traces the near-fatal 1989 attack on a woman and the media frenzy and public hysteria that culminated in the wrongful convictions of five teens, in a report that analyzes regional class and race struggles and the failures of local government and law enforcement.

Your Eyes Or Your Life

Your Eyes Or Your Life

Your Eyes Or Your Life

The book is the story of Matias Reyes who confessed to the rape of the Central Park Jogger and his connection to the Central Park Five heretofore unknown as told by the attorney who represented him and the attorney's opinion the Central Park Five had, in fact, attacked the jogger along with Reyes who was there as a result of his friendship with Steve Lopez who was one of those originally accused but not convicted. The author re-discovered a tape given to him by the District Attorney in 1989 as part of the discovery process in which Reyes confessed as part of a police interrogation process to all crimes he had committed without ever mentioning the Central Park rape which he admitted to some twelve years later. In that tape, which the author had completely forgotten about over the years included a description of young man named "Steve" with whom he had committed several robberies and a rape. His description of "Steve" was very detailed which included curly hair and a small scar on Steve's right cheek. Lopez had been fingered by the Central Park Five as the most vicious of the attackers but he never admitted to it. Consequently he was never charged with the rape of the jogger but he did plead guilty to the attack upon a male jogger for which he received a four year sentence. The author contends that these facts are strong circumstantial evidence that the Five had actually attacked the jogger . The author substantiates his claim with pictures of Lopez as he looked when he was arrested in 1989 and descriptions of the area where Steve lived and his friendship with Raymond Santana, Jr. who was one of the CP5. Matias Reyes was on the scene not by coincidence as contended by the authorities but as a result of his criminal association with Steve Lopez. The book is divided into two parts the first describing Reyes' reign of terror as the East Side Rapist and includes very graphic descriptions of his attacks on the women he raped and a more graphic description of a murder scene. It also contains Reyes' full confession to the crimes he committed alone and with "Steve". Part two is devoted entirely to an analysis of the Central Park jogger case including evidence presented by the Office of the District Attorney as to the reasons for their decision to exonerate the CP5 and the reasons submitted by law enforcement for insisting they had arrested the right persons. The concluding chapters detail the author's reasons for believing the CP5, Steve Lopez and Matias Reyes had, in truth, attacked the jogger and that their protestations of innocence were false.

Savage Portrayals

Savage Portrayals

Savage Portrayals

In 1989, the rape and beating of a white female jogger in Central Park made international headlines. Many accounts reported the incident as an example of “wilding”—episodes of poor, minority youths roaming the streets looking for trouble. Police intent on immediate justice for the victim coerced five African-American and Latino boys to plead guilty. The teenage boys were quickly convicted and imprisoned. Natalie Byfield, who covered the case for the New York Daily News, now revisits the story of the Central Park Five from her perspective as a black female reporter in Savage Portrayals. Byfield illuminates the race, class, and gender bias in the massive media coverage of the crime and the prosecution of the now-exonerated defendants. Her sociological analysis and first-person account persuasively argue that the racialized reportage of the case buttressed efforts to try juveniles as adults across the nation. Savage Portrayals casts new light on this famous crime and its far-reaching consequences for the wrongly accused and the justice system.

Encyclopedia of Rape

Encyclopedia of Rape

Encyclopedia of Rape

Examines sexual violence throughout history in the United States and around the world, and covers infamous rape cases, date-rape drugs, and victims' rights.

Not Just Race Not Just Gender

Not Just Race  Not Just Gender

Not Just Race Not Just Gender

From the nineteenth century articulations of Sojourner Truth to contemporary thinkers like Patricia J. Williams, Black feminists have always recognized the mutual dependence of race and gender. Detailing these connections, Not Just Race, Not Just Gender explores the myriad ways race and gender shape lives and social practices. Resisting essentialist tendencies, Valerie Smith identifies black feminist theorizing as a strategy of reading rather than located in a particular subjective experience. Her intent is not to deny the validity of black women's lived experience, but rather to resist deploying a uniform model of black women's lives that actually undermines the power of black feminist thought. Whether reading race or gender in the Central Park jogger case or in contemporary media, like Livin' Large, Smith displays critical rigor that promises to change the way we think about race and gender.

WORDS of a MAN

WORDS of a MAN

WORDS of a MAN

WORDS of a MAN is a selection of poems written by transformational speaker, Yusef Salaam, during his wrongful incarceration (1987-1995) in connection with the Central Park Jogger case. The case attracted nationwide attention and was the subject of many articles and books, both during and after the trials. Convictions were overturned when the real rapist - a since convicted murderer serving a life sentence - confessed to the crimes and proved to be a DNA match. Ten years later, documentarian Ken Burns, his daughter Sarah Burns and her husband David McMahon released the award-winning film, The Central Park Five, which told of this travesty from the perspective of Yusef and his cohorts.. These writings - addressing a wide range of subjects from the justice system, to love, and black life in general - helped to get a young Yusef Salaam through several years of unjust imprisonment. He hopes they will be a source of inspiration for others - especially young men of color.

Famous American Crimes and Trials 1981 2000

Famous American Crimes and Trials  1981 2000

Famous American Crimes and Trials 1981 2000

What do Lizzie Borden and O.J. Simpson have in common? Or the Lindbergh baby and Gary Gilmore? They were all the focus of famous crimes and/or trials in the United States. In this five-volume set, historical and contemporary cases that not only "shocked the nation" but that also became a part of the popular and legal culture of the United States are discussed in vivid, and sometimes shocking, detail. Each chapter focuses on a different crime or trial, and explores the ways in which each became famous in its own time. The fascinating cast of characters, the outrageous crimes, the involvement of the media, the actions of the police, and the trials that often surprised combine to offer here one of the most comprehensive sets of books available on the subject of famous U.S. crimes and trials.