Identity and Territory

Identity and Territory

Identity and Territory

Throughout history, the relationship between Jews and their land has been a vibrant, much-debated topic within the Jewish world and in international political discourse. Identity and Territory explores how ancient conceptions of Israel—of both the land itself and its shifting frontiers and borders—have played a decisive role in forming national and religious identities across the millennia. Through the works of Second Temple period Jews and rabbinic literature, Eyal Ben-Eliyahu examines the role of territorial status, boundaries, mental maps, and holy sites, drawing comparisons to popular Jewish and Christian perceptions of space. Showing how space defines nationhood and how Jewish identity influences perceptions of space, Ben-Eliyahu uncovers varied understandings of the land that resonate with contemporary views of the relationship between territory and ideology.

Nationalism and Territory

Nationalism and Territory

Nationalism and Territory

Why do nations come into conflict? What factors lead to the horrors of ethnic cleansing? This timely book offers clear-eyed answers to these questions by exploring how national identity is shaped by place, focusing especially on Serbia, Hungary, and Romania. Moving beyond studies of nationalism that consider only the economic and geostrategic value of territory, George W. White shows that the very core of national identity is intimately bound to specific places. Indeed, nations define themselves in terms of spaces that have historical, linguistic, and religious meaning, as Serbs have clearly demonstrated in Kosovo. These territories are concrete expressions of a nationAIs identity, both past and present. With his detailed analysis of the places that define national identity in Southeastern Europe, White convincingly shows why territorial disputes so often escalate into war.

Nested Identities

Nested Identities

Nested Identities

This groundbreaking work explores the vital importance of territory and space to any genuine understanding of nationalism and identity. Too often, the contributors argue, national identity is analyzed apart from the lands that are integral to its formation, as territory is seen as a commodity to be brokered rather than as central to a group's self-definition. This volume combines theoretical insights with structured case studies on how national identity manifests itself in space and at different geographical scales.

Economy Territory Identity

Economy  Territory  Identity

Economy Territory Identity


Geopolitics in Post Wall Europe

Geopolitics in Post Wall Europe

Geopolitics in Post Wall Europe

The fall of the Berlin Wall symbolized a dramatic turning point in the history of European politics and security. Geopolitics in Post-Wall Europe highlights the new relations between politics, culture and territory. It analyzes the major geopolitical shifts in the connection between security and identity. Part One covers the general geopolitical tendencies in Europe, including conflicts between culturism' and universalism, between national-romantic primordialism and cosmopolitan post-national identities, and between territory and escape from territory. Part Two deals with potential tensions between Russia and Europe and the possible emergence of a new European wall' between an extended NATO on the one hand, and Russia and the CIS on the other. Part Three focuses on the borderland between Europe, Russia and the Muslim world, with particular emphasis on the former Yugoslavia as a site of conflict between new metaphorical empires'.

Forgetting Ourselves

Forgetting Ourselves

Forgetting Ourselves

Bishai, however, historicizes and questions to concept of secession itself, as well as the component assumptions of territoriality and identity upon which it rests. She argues that understanding the historic contingency of secessionist conflict allows us to contemplate an alternative vision of international relations in which the violence associated with controlling territory is no longer necessary for validating political identities."--Jacket.

Territory Identity and Spatial Planning

Territory  Identity and Spatial Planning

Territory Identity and Spatial Planning

This book provides a multi-disciplinary study of territory, identity and space in a devolved UK, through the lens of spatial planning. It draws together leading internationally renowned researchers from a variety of disciplines to address the implications of devolution upon spatial planning and the rescaling of UK politics. Each contributor offers a different perspective on the core issues in planning today in the context of New Labour’s regional project, particularly the government’s concern with business competitiveness, and key themes are illustrated with important case studies throughout.

Home Territories

Home Territories

Home Territories

Home Territories examines how traditional ideas of home, homeland and nation have been destabilised both by new patterns of migration and by new communication technologies which routinely transgress the symbolic boundaries around both the private household and the nation state. David Morley analyses the varieties of exile, diaspora, displacement, connectedness, mobility experienced by members of social groups, and relates the micro structures of the home, the family and the domestic realm, to contemporary debates about the nation, community and cultural identities. He explores issues such as the role of gender in the construction of domesticity, and the conflation of ideas of maternity and home, and engages with recent debates about the 'territorialisation of culture'.

Territory and Identity in Tibet and the Himalayas

Territory and Identity in Tibet and the Himalayas

Territory and Identity in Tibet and the Himalayas

The essays of this volume, result of an interdisciplinary panel held at an IATS conference in Leyden 2000, attempt to document and interpret the ways in which issues of Identity relate to notions of Territory in Tibet and the Himalayas.