Interplanetary Robots

Interplanetary Robots

Interplanetary Robots

A NASA insider tells the exciting story of robotic space missions to explore the solar system. Exploring the planets has been a goal of America's space program since the dawn of the space race. This insider's perspective examines incredible missions of robotic spacecraft to every corner of our solar system and beyond. Some were flown into glory, while others were planned and relegated to dusty filing cabinets. All were remarkable in their aspirations. Award-winning science writer Rod Pyle profiles both the remarkable spacecraft and the amazing scientists and engineers who made them possible. From the earliest sprints past Venus and Mars to Voyager1's current explorations of the space between the stars, this exciting book sheds new light on ever-more ambitious journeys designed to increase the human reach into the solar system. Drawing on his perspective as a writer for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, ground zero for NASA's planetary exploration, the author further details plans now in development to look for signs of life on Jupiter's moon Europa, submarines that will dive into the hazy hydrocarbon lakes of Saturn's moon Titan, and intelligent spacecraft that will operate for months without human intervention on Mars and in the outer solar system well into the 2030s. Equally compelling are programs of exploration that were considered but never left the drawing board, such as automobile-sized biology laboratories designed for a Mars landing in the 1960s and plans to detonate atomic bombs on the moon. Complemented by many rarely-seen photos and illustrations, these stories of incredible engineering achievements, daring imaginations, and technological genius will fascinate and inspire.

Robots in Space

Robots in Space

Robots in Space

Given the near incomprehensible enormity of the universe, it appears almost inevitable that humankind will one day find a planet that appears to be much like the Earth. This discovery will no doubt reignite the lure of interplanetary travel. Will we be up to the task? And, given our limited resources, biological constraints, and the general hostility of space, what shape should we expect such expeditions to take? In Robots in Space, Roger Launius and Howard McCurdy tackle these seemingly fanciful questions with rigorous scholarship and disciplined imagination, jumping comfortably among the worlds of rocketry, engineering, public policy, and science fantasy to expound upon the possibilities and improbabilities involved in trekking across the Milky Way and beyond. They survey the literature—fictional as well as academic studies; outline the progress of space programs in the United States and other nations; and assess the current state of affairs to offer a conclusion startling only to those who haven’t spent time with Asimov, Heinlein, and Clarke: to traverse the cosmos, humans must embrace and entwine themselves with advanced robotic technologies. Their discussion is as entertaining as it is edifying and their assertions are as sound as they are fantastical. Rather than asking us to suspend disbelief, Robots in Space demands that we accept facts as they evolve.

Working Robots

Working Robots

Working Robots

Presents an overview of the various kinds of working robots, or intelligent machines, and their growing inpact on the economy and society.

Inventions Robots Future

Inventions  Robots  Future

Inventions Robots Future

A textbook for gifted students in grades 4 through 8, designed to develop higher-level thinking skills.

Chicago Journal of International Law

Chicago Journal of International Law

Chicago Journal of International Law

The Chicago Journal of International Law is an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and analysis of international law and policy issues.

Mad Tausig Vs the Interplanetary Puzzling Peace Patrol

Mad Tausig Vs the Interplanetary Puzzling Peace Patrol

Mad Tausig Vs the Interplanetary Puzzling Peace Patrol

Upon graduating from the I3P (Interplanetary Puzzling Peace Patrol), your first assignment is to stop Mad Tausig. It won’t be easy! Puzzles, traps, mazes, and robots lie in wait on your journey to foil this madman’s plot. From his puzzle lab in Brooklyn, New York,Ben Tausigwrites crosswords forThe New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Reader,and many other fine papers. Goopymartis a one-man (Will Guy) design studio specializing in bright, colorful, lumpy things.