The Battle of Jutland 1916

The Battle of Jutland 1916

The Battle of Jutland 1916

The British Grand Fleet which engaged the German High Seas Fleet at Jutland in 1916 was the most formidable in the history of the Royal Navy. Admiral Sir John Jellicoe's 151 warships included 28 battleships and nine battle cruisers, commanded by 13 admirals and 75 commodores and post captains. The Royal Navy and British public confidently expected another Trafalgar. Instead, the Grand Fleet was severely mauled by the German Navy, which did not exist when Jellicoe was born, and lost more ships and many more men. George Bonney recalls this historic naval battle fought nearly a century ago that shook the nation, navy and the empire. The defeat also highlighted fundamental shortcomings in equipment, training, command and control in a British Fleet that had once appeared invincible.

Jutland 1916

Jutland  1916

Jutland 1916


Jutland 1916

Jutland 1916

Jutland 1916

One of the great battles of naval history, the 1916 Battle of Jutland has been surrounded by controversy ever since. At the time, the British public felt Admiral Jellicoe had failed. The reality was much more complicated.

Jutland 1916

Jutland  1916

Jutland 1916

Dramatic, illustrated account of the biggest naval battle of the First World War. On 31 May, 1916, the great battle fleets of Britain and Germany met off Jutland in the North Sea. It was a climactic encounter, the culmination of a fantastically expensive naval race between the two countries, and expectations on both sides were high. For the Royal Navy's Grand Fleet, there was the chance to win another Trafalgar. For the German High Seas Fleet, there was the opportunity to break the British blockade and so change the course of the war. But Jutland was a confused and controversial encounter. Tactically, it was a draw; strategically, it was a British victory. Naval historians have pored over the minutiae of Jutland ever since. Yet they have largely ignored what the battle was actually like for its thousands of participants. Full of drama and pathos, of chaos and courage, JUTLAND, 1916 describes the sea battle in the dreadnought era from the point of view of those who were there.

Jutland 1916

Jutland 1916

Jutland 1916

The Battle of Jutland was the largest naval battle and the only full-scale clash of battleships in the First World War. For years the myriad factors contributing to the loss of many of the ships remained a mystery, subject only to speculation and theory. In this book, marine archaeologist and historian Dr Innes McCartney reveals for the first time what became of the warships that vanished on the night of 31st May 1916, examining the circumstances behind the loss of each ship and reconciling what was known in 1916 to what the archaeology is revealing today. The knowledge of what was present was transformed in 2015 by a groundbreaking survey using the modern technology of multi-beam. This greatly assisted in unravelling the details behind several Jutland enigmas, not least the devastating explosions which claimed five major British warships, the details of the wrecks of the 13 destroyers lost in the battle and the German warships scuttled during the night phase. This is the first book to identify the locations of many of the wrecks, and – scandalously – how more than half of these sites have been illegally plundered for salvage, despite their status as war graves. An essential and revelatory read for anyone interested in naval history and marine archaeology.

Jutland 1916

Jutland  1916

Jutland 1916

In the simulation as soon as a major German force is detected, the British Cover Force will transition from cruising to combat navigation, reducing the distances between its northernmost squadrons - especially the 5th battleship - and the flagship of the fleet, the Lion, to follow our hypothesis raised about a higher Concentration of Forces. Also, it will be essential to exchange information between the Cover Fleet and the Battle Fleet, in order to follow our hypothesis regarding better Communications. From the outset our Great Fleet will attempt to obtain and maintain the initiative by forcing the enemy to react and concentrating our firepower on the decisive point (s), in order to follow our hypothesis as to a better Coordination.

Flawed Victory

Flawed Victory

Flawed Victory

With style and verve, Yates expertly analyzes the Battle of Jutland and the post-war controversy.

The Battle of Jutland Bank

The Battle of Jutland Bank

The Battle of Jutland Bank

This is an interesting, in depth examination of the Battle of Jutland Bank during the First World War. It contains well over one hundred footnotes, maps, and illustrations.

The Battle of Jutland

The Battle of Jutland

The Battle of Jutland

The Battle of Jutland was the greatest naval engagement of the First World War, if not any war. Admiral Scheer had adopted a policy of launching attacks against the British coast. What he did not know was that the British had broken his naval codes and that they knew of his plans. Consequently, when Scheer threw his entire fleet in a mission to attack the British mainland in May 1916, he could not know that the Royal Navy at Scapa Flow were underway.This is a fresh account of this greatest naval engagement, it offers fascinating insight into the events preceding the action, the tactics during the battle and the political and military fall-out. The book draws on released official records and personal accounts.Jellicoe failed to ensnare Scheer and the bulk of the German fleet which escaped battered, but intact. The Germans knew however that despite their great fleet, it was the Royal Navy that controlled the North Sea.