From Abbotts To Zurich

From Abbotts To Zurich

From Abbotts To Zurich

Sangerfield: The town was established in 1795 on land originally owned by Jebediah Sanger who, wanting to have a new settlement named after him, promised a cask of rum for the first town meeting and 50 acres to the first church. The rum was drunk at the first town meeting in 1795. The Native American name for the site was Skanawis, "a long swamp." East New York: John Pitkin came here from Connecticut in 1835 and bought land that he developed. He chose this name to make people think that this place was the eastern end of New York City. Morganville: This place was named for William Morgan, a former Mason, who had written a book that supposedly revealed the secrets of Masonry. He disappeared in 1826, a possible murder victim. His disappearance sparked the anti-Masonic movement. From Abbotts to Zurich provides a provocative glimpse into the history of the region. It also tells the story of a young and growing nation, how it wanted to be identified, and how the people populating the land thought of themselves. The names are not just labels for locations, but they are cultural and historic guideposts to past ideas. Each place's origin is traced and studied, providing a reason for its name and hints at the origins of the people who originally settled there.

Landmarks of Niagara County New York Primary Source Edition

Landmarks of Niagara County  New York    Primary Source Edition

Landmarks of Niagara County New York Primary Source Edition

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Landmarks of Niagara County New York

Landmarks of Niagara County  New York

Landmarks of Niagara County New York

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Under the Mountain

Under the Mountain

Under the Mountain


Landmarks of Niagara County New York Classic Reprint

Landmarks of Niagara County  New York  Classic Reprint

Landmarks of Niagara County New York Classic Reprint

Excerpt from Landmarks of Niagara County, New York Landmarks of Niagara County, New York was written by William Pool in 1897. This is a 806 page book, containing 336392 words and 47 pictures. Search Inside is enabled for this title. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.