Living in the Number One Country

Living in the Number One Country

Living in the Number One Country

A critique of the "American Empire" focuses on the role of communications corporations in controlling information and speech throughout the world.

Country Music is Wherever the Soul of a Country Music Fan Is Opryland U S A and the Importance of Home in Country Music

 Country Music is Wherever the Soul of a Country Music Fan Is   Opryland U S A  and the Importance of Home in Country Music

Country Music is Wherever the Soul of a Country Music Fan Is Opryland U S A and the Importance of Home in Country Music

Nixon's visit (only five months before his resignation) was seen by national journalists and politicos to be a trip to one of the few places where he would still receive a warm reception, and it was quite warm indeed. Nixon took the stage, played two songs on the piano, and bantered with Roy Acuff." When the Opry changed sites it wasn't without a good deal of growing pains, angst, and rhetoric—but by taking old values to the new venue, not to mention a circle of the original old floor, country music survived the switch. This article appears in the 2011 Music issue of Southern Cultures. Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Southern Cultures 2011 Music Issue Enhanced Ebook

Southern Cultures  2011 Music Issue  Enhanced Ebook

Southern Cultures 2011 Music Issue Enhanced Ebook

The Music Issue enhanced eBook include all the tracks on our special CD and: The tell-all letter from a teenage girl who kissed—and kissed—Elvis Presley How corruption and greed made the Jacksonville music scene Gretchen Wilson, country music's "Redneck Woman" The invaluable social spaces of African American record stores Bobby Rush, "bluesman-plus" Where Opryland resides in hearts, minds, and souls Backstage with the Avett Brothers, Doc Watson, Tift Merritt, Southern Culture on the Skids, the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Johnny Cash, and more great artists. This enhanced eBook also contains Loving, Leaving, Liquor, and the Lord, which is packed with tracks from the Avett Brothers, Doc and Merle Watson, Archers of Loaf, and many more amazing Southern musicians--old and new. Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Country Living

Country Living

Country Living

Offers household hints and practical solutions to everyday problems, covering such diverse topics as clutter control, gardening, baking, and cleaning.

So You Want to Be a Leader

So You Want to Be a Leader

So You Want to Be a Leader

We ask much of our leaders and blame them for ay failure to order the world to our liking. Yet many of us are reluctant to engage, preferring to disparage leaders as a class apart, a quarrelsome lot and overpaid to boot-the useful butt of barbecue humour. Will we engage better with the next generation of leaders? Will they conduct a kinder, gentler national conversation? In this book, 36 Australian voices-both early achievers and the venerable from across the political and social landscape-offer fresh ideas and timeless wisdom for people entering public life. Whether you are a budding politician, advisor, lobbyist, advocate, local councillor, NGO leader, social activist, blogger, philanthropist, sporting administrator or the representative of an industry, the arts, a profession or a trade-you are in public life. This book will deepen your understanding of what you must know, do, say and be to succeed. "... Philip Crisp has done us all an enormous favour by assembling not only a first class and diverse group of leaders, but ones who are willing to be frank, confronting and not merely offering the usual 'leadership' platitudes." - Simon McKeon AO: Australian of the Year 2011 "... a 'must read' for any aspiring leader... a treasure trove of invaluable insights into effective leadership." - Laurie Wilson: President, National Press Club "... a most timely and comprehensive analysis of leadership and the making of good leaders... Compulsory reading." - Anne Henderson AM: political historian

Enemy Number One

Enemy Number One

Enemy Number One

Enemy Number One tells the story of the Soviet cultural and propaganda apparatus and its efforts to control information about the United States in the postwar landscape. Beginning with the 1945 meeting of American and Soviet troops on the Elbe, this period saw cultural relations develop in close connection to oppression as the Soviet authorities attempted to contain and appropriate images of the United States. Rósa Magnúsdóttir analyzes two official narratives about the USSR's "enemy number one" --Stalin's anti-American campaign and Khrushchev's policy of peaceful coexistence--and shows how each relied on the legacy of the wartime alliance in their approach. Stalin used the wartime experience to spread fear of a renewed war, while Khrushchev used the wartime alliance as proof that the two superpowers could work together. Drawing from extensive archival resources, Magnúsdóttir brings to life the propaganda warriors and ideological chiefs of the early Cold War period in the Soviet Union, revealing their confusion and insecurities as they attempted to navigate the uncertain world of late Stalin and early Khrushchev cultural bureaucracy. She also demonstrates how concerned Soviet authorities were by their people's presumed interest in the United States, resorting to monitoring and even repression-behavior indicative of the inferiority complex of the Soviet project as it related to the outside world.

Southern Living Country Music s Greatest Eats presented by CMT

Southern Living Country Music s Greatest Eats   presented by CMT

Southern Living Country Music s Greatest Eats presented by CMT

Over 30 of country music's brightest stars share their favorite food stories, told through a combination of fond recollections of great meals with family and friends, favorite memories and meals "from the road", sneak-peaks into their home kitchens, and over 100 of their own favorite recipes. Readers will be tapping their toes and humming along as they head to the kitchen to recreate these soon-to-be flavor favorites. Inspired by the recipes drawn from the files and food memories of some country music's greatest celebrities--from legends like Wynonna Judd and George Strait to today's brightest stars like Taylor Swift and Zac Brown--Southern Living Country Music's Greatest Eats celebrates the genre's greatest hits and irresistible flavors. Readers will truly have the sense of getting up close and personal with their favorite artists--and there's no better place to get to know someone than in their kitchen.

Living in the Environment Principles Connections and Solutions

Living in the Environment  Principles  Connections  and Solutions

Living in the Environment Principles Connections and Solutions

Sustainability is the integrating theme of this current and thought-provoking book. LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT provides the basic scientific tools for understanding and thinking critically about the environment. Co-authors G. Tyler Miller and Scott Spoolman inspire students to take a positive approach toward finding and implementing useful environmental solutions in their own lives and in their careers. Updated with the most up-to-date information, art, and Good News examples, the text engages and motivates students with vivid case studies and hands-on quantitative exercises. The concept-centered approach transforms complex environmental topics and issues into key concepts that students will understand and remember. Overall, by framing the concepts with goals for more sustainable lifestyles and human communities, students see how promising the future can be. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Life in the Country Through the Eyes of a Kid

Life in the Country Through the Eyes of a Kid

Life in the Country Through the Eyes of a Kid

Many times, we talk about the good ole days but seldom can pinpoint just what and why they were. The stories and tales I have written straight from memory goes back to my childhood, beginning at age two, and proceeds through my sixteenth year. I promise you there is absolutely no fiction in these stories. Life on the farm was lived day by day, and nowhere in the universe could you be closer to God. You had to have complete faith, but at the same time, you had to believe in your mother and father as being your leaders, teachers, and protectors. This came about from being lucky enough to be born and raised as a country kid. Born the middle child of sharecropper parents, we lived in rental houses, many of which were close to a hundred years old. Most had no insulation; floors had cracks you could see light through and had single-pane windows that gave little or no protection against the cold. But in all cases, they were where we called home. The sound of wood snapping and popping in the cast iron stove let you know that you were safe and would remain warm throughout the many years and winters that were to come and many that had gone. My parents worked day and night to meet the needs of three children, and all our needs were met without compromise. It was our wants that made us become self-sufficient but never our needs. We did not have electricity in our farmhouse until I was almost twelve years old, so evenings were spent with family in front of a kerosene lamp, and going to bed early was the order of the day. The kids played outdoors the entire day when winter cold and summer heat was a part of our lives. We had chores to do, and working in the garden was expected as part of our entertainment. I cannot imagine how my life could have been any more perfect or my outlook on tomorrow could have been any stronger if I had been born and raised anywhere other than with my parents on the family farm.