Managing Project Competence

Managing Project Competence

Managing Project Competence

For companies to be successful, the management of an organization needs to understand how competence evolves and how it can be utilized and linked to the organization’s goals. When executive managers understand this, there is a higher probability that the people working in the organization will be more satisfied with their working situation. Satisfaction increases because competence will likely be central in the organization, with focus on motivating people to develop new competence, healthy internal mobility, and organizational learning. Positively managing competence in most cases leads to a win–win situation for the company and the individual. This book describes how we as individuals, as well as organizations, can be efficient in the development and utilization of competence. It takes two perspectives of competence and connects them in a project-intensive and knowledge-intensive context. The first perspective is the "Lemon," which focuses on individual competence and the role of organizational culture. The Lemon framework takes the concept of competence based on knowledge and experience and explains how a person can apply knowledge and experience to different contexts. It changes the concept of competence from being static to being agile and dynamic. The second perspective of competence is the "Loop," which models how organizations can manage not only to the benefit of organizational strategies and goals but also to an individual’s future career. The Lemon and the Loop are the basic tools to make competence and performance management agile and effective. This book presents practical ways to acquire new knowledge and skills. One method is REPI (Reflection, Elaboration, Practicing/Participation, and Investigation), which can be used for training, coaching, competence development, agile performance management, and much more. Readers of the book are given new insight into the concept of competence and how both people and organizations can be more competitive, innovative, and open to learning. In addition, the readers get practical tools and advice on how to act in different situations to manage both organizational and individual learning. Managing Project Competence: The Lemon and the Loop breaks old views of looking at competence and brings competence into the knowledge-intensive age.

Managing Project Competence

Managing Project Competence

Managing Project Competence

For companies to be successful, the management of an organization needs to understand how competence evolves and how it can be utilized and linked to the organization's goals. When executive managers understand this, there is a higher probability that the people working in the organization will be more satisfied with their working situation. Satisfaction increases because competence will likely be central in the organization, with focus on motivating people to develop new competence, healthy internal mobility, and organizational learning. Positively managing competence in most cases leads to a win-win situation for the company and the individual. This book describes how we as individuals, as well as organizations, can be efficient in the development and utilization of competence. It takes two perspectives of competence and connects them in a project-intensive and knowledge-intensive context. The first perspective is the "Lemon," which focuses on individual competence and the role of organizational culture. The Lemon framework takes the concept of competence based on knowledge and experience and explains how a person can apply knowledge and experience to different contexts. It changes the concept of competence from being static to being agile and dynamic. The second perspective of competence is the "Loop," which models how organizations can manage not only to the benefit of organizational strategies and goals but also to an individual's future career. The Lemon and the Loop are the basic tools to make competence and performance management agile and effective. This book presents practical ways to acquire new knowledge and skills. One method is REPI (Reflection, Elaboration, Practicing/Participation, and Investigation), which can be used for training, coaching, competence development, agile performance management, and much more. Readers of the book are given new insight into the concept of competence and how both people and organizations can be more competitive, innovative, and open to learning. In addition, the readers get practical tools and advice on how to act in different situations to manage both organizational and individual learning. Managing Project Competence: The Lemon and the Loop breaks old views of looking at competence and brings competence into the knowledge-intensive age.

The Wiley Guide to Project Organization and Project Management Competencies

The Wiley Guide to Project Organization and Project Management Competencies

The Wiley Guide to Project Organization and Project Management Competencies

A guide to the human factors in project management: knowledge, learning, and maturity The Wiley Guides to the Management of Projects address critical, need-to-know information that will help professionals successfully manage projects in most businesses and help students learn the best practices of the industry. They contain not only well-known and widely used basic project management practices but also the newest and most cutting-edge concepts in the broader theory and practice of managing projects. This third volume in the series covers a range of organizational and people-based topics that are occupying the project management world today. The essence of project management represents a "people" challenge-the ability to appreciate and effectively employ the competencies of all those who are associated with the project development and delivery process. This book explains how you can more successfully manage a project from inception through delivery by learning how to handle critical issues around structure, teams, leadership, power and negotiation, and the whole area of competencies. The expert contributors also include chapters on global project management knowledge and standards, the role of project management associations around the world, project management maturity models, and other key topics. Complete your understanding of project management with these other books in The Wiley Guides to the Management of Projects series: * The Wiley Guide to Project Control * The Wiley Guide to Project, Program & Portfolio Management * The Wiley Guide to Project Technology, Supply Chain & Procurement Management

Managing Project Ending

Managing Project Ending

Managing Project Ending

Understanding project endings is a significant part of project management, yet there is relatively little work published in this important area. This book addresses the gap, focusing on the successful management of project endings, showing how to plan for the ending of a project, how to create ending competencies, and in particular, how to successfully manage relations with different stakeholders of a project as it is coming to an end. Havila and Salmi use a real-life case in the airline industry to show how the successful ending project was achieved and in doing so portray ideas and experiences not typically considered in the field. Through the case discussion, the complexity of the process is unveiled and the achievement of success for all parties is explained. The book portrays three key success factors: ending competencies, to be developed both at the organizational and individual levels; efficient management of the business network around the ending project; and involvement at the strategic managerial level. It concludes that project endings are often complex and have far-reaching effects, and therefore, call for close managerial attention.

Social Competence in Project Management

Social Competence in Project Management

Social Competence in Project Management

Project methodology focuses on processes and systems, rather than the human aspects of managing a project. This title offers a rigorous, pragmatic guide to understanding and using self-awareness, personal and social competence within the context of a project.

Choosing Appropriate Project Managers

Choosing Appropriate Project Managers

Choosing Appropriate Project Managers

In Choosing Appropriate Project Managers, the authors set out to challenge two commonly held – and related – views found in the project management community: Project Manager as a tool: The project manager is simply a facilitator for the project management process and that implementing the right systems and procedures are more important than any individual project managerProject management is universal: Once an individual has acquired the skills of project management, that individual can manage any type of project, regardless of technology, industry or domain knowledge

Information technology project managers competencies An analysis of performance and personal competencies

Information technology project managers    competencies  An analysis of performance and personal competencies

Information technology project managers competencies An analysis of performance and personal competencies

The purpose of this book is to shed light on the performance and personal competencies of information technology (IT) project managers in South Africa. Predictive models are built to determine what project managers consider the crucial competencies they should possess to deliver an IT project successfully. This investigation takes place in the context of poor IT project success rates globally and, in particular, in South Africa. This novel research seeks to extend the debate on project success beyond what constitutes success or failure, but seeks to find clarity in what IT project managers believe are the essential competencies in practice. This quantitative research gathered data by way of an online survey based on literature regarding the Project Management Competency Development Framework (PMCDF). The population consisted of IT project managers in South Africa. Four hundred and two respondents chose to share their insights. Through the use of descriptive and multivariate statistics, major competency factors were identified. These factors were used in structural equation modelling to build various validated predictive models. This book contributes to the current body of knowledge by uncovering the competencies that IT project managers consider themselves competent in. The structural equation models indicated predictors of perceived competence by IT project managers and where these perceived competencies differ from literature. Twelve managerial implications are highlighted in the final chapter that seek to draw the myriad threads together into a coherent summary. It is apparent that IT project managers do not consider the PMCDF important in its entirety, but instead choose to focus on certain competencies.

The Wiley Guide to Managing Projects

The Wiley Guide to Managing Projects

The Wiley Guide to Managing Projects

This comprehensive resource presents the fundamentals of project management and ties them to strategic business systems and procedures. This insightful guide demonstrates how project management fits into an organization and offers helpful advice on applying this knowledge on the job.

Using the Project Management Competence Development Framework to Improve Project Management Capability

Using the Project Management Competence Development Framework to Improve Project Management Capability

Using the Project Management Competence Development Framework to Improve Project Management Capability

In 2007, PMI published the second edition of its Project Manager Competency Development Framework (PMCDF), a publication that outlines a framework developed--via a PMI-sponsored research project--to support PMI's PMP examination process. Authored by the project manager for PMI's PMCDF, second edition, this paper examines PMCDF's framework and explains how project managers can use it to improve both their professional competence in managing projects and their organization's capability to practice project management. In doing so, it overviews PMCDF's evolution and PMI's effort to develop and publish its PMCDF, second edition. It defines PMCDF's purpose and its dimensions of project management competence. It then outlines the PMCDF framework, as published in PMI's PMCDF, second edition. It identifies the framework's five performance competencies and six personal competencies; it discusses the three levels of competence rigor (low, medium, and high) and describes the significance of high vigor. It also looks at how project managers can perform self-assessments and organizational assessments as well as how they can develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate a plan to improve their individual project management competencies.