Monitoring Laws

Monitoring Laws

Monitoring Laws

Our world, and the objects and people within it, are increasingly interpreted and classified by automated systems. At the same time, those automated systems and their classifications influence what happens in the physical world. In this cyber-physical world or 'world state', people are asking what law's role should be in regulating these systems. In Monitoring Laws, Jake Goldenfein traces the history of government profiling, from the invention of photography to create criminal registers, through the emerging deployments of computer vision for personality, emotion, and behavioral analysis. He asks what elements and applications of profiling have provoked legal intervention in the past, and demonstrates exactly what is different about contemporary profiling that requires a new legal treatments. This work should be read by anyone interested in how computation is changing society and governance, and what the law can do to better protect us from these changes now.

Reform of the Federal Criminal Laws

Reform of the Federal Criminal Laws

Reform of the Federal Criminal Laws


Employment Privacy Law in the European Union

Employment Privacy Law in the European Union

Employment Privacy Law in the European Union

This book contains the national reports and a comparative synthesis regarding the employment privacy law in the European Union. It reflects the background research that has been undertaken to prepare a European study conducted with the support of the European Commission, DG Employment, and Social Affairs. The main purpose of this research has been to undertake a comparative study in the European Union on the issue of the protection of workers' personal data, more in particular concerning the case of surveillance and monitoring. The study has focused on the situation in the various Member States of the European Union and has aimed to focus on the extent of the Member State laws and guidelines in this area, on whether such laws or existing guidelines adequately protect the worker, and on suggestions or recommendations or appropriate guidelines that would ensure suitable protection for the worker in relation to his or her monitoring and surveillance by the employer. The research has been undertaken under the supervision of the editor with the cooperation of the contributors who are all specialists in the field of employment privacy. Each expert has prepared a country study regarding the situation in the relevant Member State. The national research activities have resulted in a general discussion at a closed expert meeting on 4 and 5 October 2001, organised at the Law Faculty of the University of Leuven (Belgium). During this seminar, country surveys have been further explained and discussed, and policy options or suggestions have been looked upon in the examined field of study. The comparative overview departs from the horizontal approach of comparativism. This means that it integrates all relevant information regarding Member States horizontally, throughout the general theme and its appropriate subthemes. Contributions to this book are made by: C. Castro, X.C. Vásquez, M. Colucci, M. Forde, A. Höland, T. Homan, A. Johansson, L. Kanellos, J. Kristiansen, N. Melzer, G. Morris, S. Nerbonne, A. von Koskull.