The Nasirean Ethics

The Nasirean Ethics

The Nasirean Ethics

The Nasirean Ethics is the best known ethical digest to be composed in medieval Persia, if not in all mediaeval Islam. It appeared initially in 633/1235 when Tūsī was already a celebrated scholar, scientist, politico-religious propagandist. The work has a special significance as being composed by an outstanding figure at a crucial time in the history he was himself helping to shape: some twenty years later Tūsī was to cross the greatest psychological watershed in Islamic civilization, playing a leading part in the capture of Baghdad and the extinction of the generally acknowledged Caliphate there. In this work the author is primarily concerned with the criteria of human behaviour: first in terms of space and priority allotted, at the individual level, secondly, at the economic level and thirdly at the political level.

Nasir Al Din Tusi

Nasir Al Din Tusi

Nasir Al Din Tusi

Nasir al-Din Tusi: A Philosopher for All Seasons explores the life and work of the medieval Persian polymath Nasir al-Din Tusi (d. 1274) within the historical and religious contexts in which he was active during the course of his eventful life. The book brings to light the philosophical character of all the different intellectual areas and genres of writing that Tusi experimented with, including: metaphysics, theology, ethics, politics, astronomy, logic, and aesthetics. The author describes one of the most tumultuous periods in medieval Muslim history between Mongols invasions and Isma'ili ascendancy. She illustrates the cross-fertilization of ideas which found their broadest expression in the thought and writings of Nasir al-Din Tusi.

Na r al D n al s s Memoir on Astronomy al Tadhkira f cilm al hay a

Na     r al D  n al      s     s Memoir on Astronomy  al Tadhkira f   cilm al hay   a

Na r al D n al s s Memoir on Astronomy al Tadhkira f cilm al hay a

I was introduced to Tiisi: and his Tadhkira some 19 years ago. That first meeting was neither happy nor auspicious. My graduate student notes from the time indicate a certain level of confusion and frustration; I seem to have had trouble with such words as tadwlr (epicycle), which was not to be found in my standard dictionary, and with the concept of solid-sphere astronomy, which, when found, was pooh-poohed in the standard sources. I had another, even more decisive reaction: boredom. Only the end of the term brought relief, and I was grateful to be on to other, more exciting aspects of the history of science. A few years later, I found myself, thanks to fellowships from Fulbright-Hays and the American Research Center in Egypt, happily immersed in the manu script collections of Damascus, Aleppo, and Cairo. Though I had intended to work on a topic in the history of mathematics, I was drawn, perhaps inevitably, to a certain type of astronomical writing falling under the rubric of hay' a. At first this fascination was based on sheer numbers; that so many medieval scientists could have written on such a subject must mean something, I told myself. (I was in a sociological mode at the time.

Na r Al D n us on Finance

Na     r Al D  n    us   on Finance

Na r Al D n us on Finance


Na r al D n al s s Memoir on Astronomy al Tadhkira f cilm al hay a

Na     r al D  n al      s     s Memoir on Astronomy  al Tadhkira f   cilm al hay   a

Na r al D n al s s Memoir on Astronomy al Tadhkira f cilm al hay a

I was introduced to Tiisi: and his Tadhkira some 19 years ago. That first meeting was neither happy nor auspicious. My graduate student notes from the time indicate a certain level of confusion and frustration; I seem to have had trouble with such words as tadwlr (epicycle), which was not to be found in my standard dictionary, and with the concept of solid-sphere astronomy, which, when found, was pooh-poohed in the standard sources. I had another, even more decisive reaction: boredom. Only the end of the term brought relief, and I was grateful to be on to other, more exciting aspects of the history of science. A few years later, I found myself, thanks to fellowships from Fulbright-Hays and the American Research Center in Egypt, happily immersed in the manu script collections of Damascus, Aleppo, and Cairo. Though I had intended to work on a topic in the history of mathematics, I was drawn, perhaps inevitably, to a certain type of astronomical writing falling under the rubric of hay' a. At first this fascination was based on sheer numbers; that so many medieval scientists could have written on such a subject must mean something, I told myself. (I was in a sociological mode at the time.

A Princely Pandect on Astronomy

A Princely Pandect on Astronomy

A Princely Pandect on Astronomy

This book presents an English-language translation of Risālā-yi Muʿīnīya, or the Muʿīnīya Epistle. Risālā-yi Muʿīnīya is one of the earliest known works of Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī (1201–1274), an intellectual luminary of the 13th century CE. The work is notable for the choice of Ṭūsī’s native Persian as the language of the text. In addition, Ṭūsī organized his volume into a four-part structure, which went on to become a popular template for the Islamic astronomers who succeeded him. This book helped ensure the patronage of Ṭūsī's courtly patrons during his decades-long stay with the Ismaʿīlīs, as well as the continuation of his remarkable career under the first Ilkhanid rulers of Persia. This translation helps make this notable treatise accessible to English language readers. It is among a handful of English translations of major astronomical works dealing with hay’a/cosmography in the Islamic world. Subsequently Ṭūsī was to pen his own commentary on the work (the Ḥall-i Mushkilāt-i Muʿīnīya, or A solution to the difficulties of the Muʿīnīya) and he used this occasion to discuss his celebrated mathematical formulation “the Ṭūsī Couple” (a concept that he merely hinted at in the Risālā-yi Muʿīnīya).