New York Diaries

New York Diaries

New York Diaries

Writings culled from the archives of libraries, historical societies, and private estates have been assembled to offer a view of the iconic metropolis of New York. Includes excerpts from the writings of Henry Hudson, Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Andy Warhol, and many others

The Women Who Made New York

The Women Who Made New York

The Women Who Made New York

An illuminating, elegant history of New York City, told through the stories of the women who made it the most exciting and influential metropolis in the world Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world. But that's not the whole story. The Women Who Made New York reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists, like Zora Neale Hurston and Audre Lorde. Others were icons and iconoclasts, like Fran Lebowitz and Grace Jones. There were also women who led quieter private lives but were just as influential, such as Emily Warren Roebling, who completed the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge when her engineer husband became too ill to work. Paired with striking, contemporary illustrations by artist Hallie Heald, The Women Who Made New York offers a visual sensation -- one that reinvigorates not just New York City's history but its very identity.

The Latecomers

The Latecomers

The Latecomers

From the bestselling author of What Was Mine-a deeply moving family drama about a young Irish immigrant, an ancestral home in New England and a dark secret that lay hidden in its walls for five generations. In 1908, sixteen-year-old Bridey runs away from her small town in Ireland with her same-age sweetheart Thom. But when Thom dies suddenly of ship fever on their ocean crossing, Bridey finds herself alone and pregnant in a strange new world. Forced by circumstance to give up the baby for adoption, Bridey finds work as a maid for the Hollingworth family at a lavish, sprawling estate. It's the dawn of a new century: innovative technologies are emerging, women's roles are changing, and Bridey is emboldened by the promise of a fresh start. She cares for the Hollingworth children as if they were her own, until a mysterious death changes Bridey and the household forever. For decades, the terrible secrets of Bridey's past continue to haunt the family. And in the present day, the youngest Hollingworth makes a connection that finally brings these dark ghost stories into the light. Told in interweaving timelines and rich with detailed history, romance and dark secrets, Helen Klein Ross' The Latecomers spans a century of America life and reminds us all that we can never truly leave the past behind.

The Message of the City

The Message of the City

The Message of the City

Dawn Powell was a gifted satirist who moved in the same circles as Dorothy Parker, Ernest Hemingway, renowned editor Maxwell Perkins, and other midcentury New York luminaries. Her many novels are typically divided into two groups: those dealing with her native Ohio and those set in New York. “From the moment she left behind her harsh upbringing in Mount Gilead, Ohio, and arrived in Manhattan, in 1918, she dove into city life with an outlander’s anthropological zeal,” reads a recent New Yorker piece about Powell, and it is those New York novels that built her reputation for scouring wit and social observation. In this critical biography and study of the New York novels, Patricia Palermo reminds us how Powell earned a place in the national literary establishment and East Coast social scene. Though Powell’s prolific output has been out of print for most of the past few decades, a revival is under way: the Library of America, touting her as a “rediscovered American comic genius,” released her collected novels, and in 2015 she was posthumously inducted into the New York State Writer’s Hall of Fame. Engaging and erudite, The Message of the City fills a major gap in in the story of a long-overlooked literary great. Palermo places Powell in cultural and historical context and, drawing on her diaries, reveals the real-life inspirations for some of her most delicious satire.

Read On History

Read On   History

Read On History

Make history come alive! This book helps librarians and teachers as well as readers themselves find books they will enjoy—titles that will animate and explain the past, entertain, and expand their minds.

New York

New York

New York


The Miss Stone Affair

The Miss Stone Affair

The Miss Stone Affair

On September 3, 1901, Miss Ellen Stone, an American missionary, set out on horseback for a trek across the mountainous hinterlands of Balkan Macedonia. In a narrow gorge she was attacked by a band of masked men who carried her off the road and, more significantly, onto the path of history. Stone would become the first American captured for ransom on foreign soil. In The Miss Stone Affair, master storyteller and Pulitzer Prize winner Teresa Carpenter re-creates the drama of this country's first modern hostage crisis -- an event that held the world's attention and dominated the headlines in American and European dailies for months. Using a wealth of contemporary correspondence and diplomatic cables, she constructs a narrative that is suspenseful, harrowing, and at times even comical. On a journey that takes the reader from Boston's Beacon Hill to Constantinople and the bloody revolution-wracked nation-states of the Balkans, Carpenter introduces an unforgettable cast of characters: the strong-willed Miss Stone and her Bulgarian companion, Katerina Tsilka, who is brought along by the kidnappers -- in deference to Victorian convention -- as a chaperone; the terrorists who threaten to murder their hostages and yet are awed when Tsilka gives birth to a baby girl; the diplomat who sees the Stone case as a vehicle for his personal ambition; rival negotiators whom the terrorists pit one against the other; a media mogul obsessed with finding the hostages and securing their literary rights; and, of course, the new president, Theodore Roosevelt, who must decide if he should, as many of his countrymen are demanding, send warships to the Near East or if some quieter form of intervention might win the day. Teresa Carpenter has produced a turn-of-the-century international thriller with precision, drama, and historical perspective. This is a story for our time.

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker


Mob Girl

Mob Girl

Mob Girl

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and author of Missing Beauty comes a fascinating inside look at the mafia. Growing up among racketeers on the Lower East Side of New York City, Arlyne Brickman associated with mobsters. Drawn to the glamorous and flashy lifestyle, she was soon dating "wiseguys" and running errands for them; but after years as a mob girlfriend, Arlyne began to get in on the action herself—eventually becoming a police informant and major witness in the government's case against the Colombo crime family.