North Carolina Potteries Through Time

North Carolina Potteries Through Time

North Carolina Potteries Through Time

Potter, teacher, and writer Jack Troy once said, "If North America has a 'pottery state, ' it must be North Carolina." North Carolina Potteries Through Time proves to readers that his assessment is correct. Prehistoric Native American potters first made pottery in the region, followed by eighteenth-century English and German settlers. Many generations of potters followed in their footsteps, and today hundreds of potters and ceramics artists turn out ware in every part of the state. In the town of Seagrove, there's a whole museum and educational center dedicated to North Carolina pottery production. Many private and public collections exist. Buyers seek it out at auctions, antique shops, kiln openings, festivals, and studio sales. This book is chock-full of images representing all periods and styles of pottery made in the state, including many published for the first time. Readers new to the topic, as well as expert collectors, historians, and potters will find satisfaction in this richly illustrated and descriptively written volume

North Carolina s Moravian Potters

North Carolina s Moravian Potters

North Carolina s Moravian Potters

North Carolina's eighteenth and nineteenth-century Moravian potters were remarkable artisans whose products included coarse earthenware, slip-trailed decorated ware, Leeds-type fine pottery, press-molded stove tiles, figural bottles, toys, and salt-glazed stoneware. Silesian-born and German-trained potter Gottfried Aust was the first to arrive in Bethabara in 1755. After that, numerous apprentices of his carried on the trade in the state and beyond. Some apprentices rose to the rank of master potter. Aust's most successful protégé, Rudolph Christ, excelled in the creation of Queensware, faience, and tortoiseshell-glazed pottery. Swiss-born Heinrich Schaffner, one of several more Moravian master potters, is famously known for his "Salem smoking pipes." Today, museums and private collectors vigorously compete for scarce examples of North Carolina-made Moravian pottery. Every piece found and preserved is like a new paragraph added to the story of the art and mystery of pottery-making in one of the South's earliest settlements.

Seagrove Pottery Through Time

Seagrove Pottery Through Time

Seagrove Pottery Through Time

For centuries, North Carolina's Seagrove region has been pottery central, where more than one hundred potters craft pottery today.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

DANIEL JOHNSTON, raised on a farm in Randolph County, returned from Thailand with a new way to make monumental pots. Back home in North Carolina, he built a log shop and a whale of a kiln for wood-firing. Then he set out to create beautiful pots, grand in scale, graceful in form, and burned bright in a blend of ash and salt. With mastery achieved and apprentices to teach, Daniel Johnston turned his brain to massive installations. First, he made a hundred large jars and lined them along the rough road that runs past his shop and kiln. Next, he arranged curving clusters of big pots inside pine frames, slatted like corn cribs, to separate them from the slick interiors of four fine galleries in succession. Then, in concluding the second phase of his professional career, Daniel Johnston built an open-air installation on the grounds around the North Carolina Museum of Art, where 178 handmade, wood-fired columns march across a slope in a straight line, 350 feet in length, that dips and lifts with the heave while the tops of the pots maintain a level horizon. In 2000, when he was still Mark Hewitt's apprentice, Daniel Johnston met Henry Glassie, who has done fieldwork on ceramic traditions in the United States, Brazil, Italy, Turkey, Bangladesh, China, and Japan. Over the years, during a steady stream of intimate interviews, Glassie gathered the understanding that enabled him to compose this portrait of Daniel Johnston, a young artist who makes great pots in the eastern Piedmont of North Carolina.

North Carolina Pottery

North Carolina Pottery

North Carolina Pottery

North Carolina is home to one of the nation's oldest and richest pottery traditions, and this volume, illustrated with 384 color photographs, catalogs more than four hundred individual pieces, provides descriptive entries on potters and potteries, and includes five essays by well-known authorities in the field of ceramics. Simultaneous.

Woodland Potters and Archaeological Ceramics of the North Carolina Coast

Woodland Potters and Archaeological Ceramics of the North Carolina Coast

Woodland Potters and Archaeological Ceramics of the North Carolina Coast

The first comprehensive study of the meaning of pottery as a social activity in coastal North Carolina. Pottery types, composed of specific sets of attributes, have long been defined for various periods and areas of the Atlantic coast, but their relationships and meanings have not been explicitly examined. In exploring these relationships for the North Carolina coast, this work examines the manner in which pottery traits cross-cut taxonomic types, tests the proposition that communities of practice existed at several scales, and questions the fundamental notion of ceramic types as ethnic markers. Ethnoarchaeological case studies provide a means of assessing the mechanics of how social structure and gender roles may have affected the transmission of pottery-making techniques and how socio-cultural boundaries are reflected in the distribution of ceramic traditions. Another very valuable source of information about past practices is replication experimentation, which provides a means of understanding the practical techniques that lie behind the observable traits, thereby improving our understanding of how certain techniques may have influenced the transmission of traits from one potter to another. Both methods are employed in this study to interpret the meaning of pottery as an indicator of social activity on the North Carolina coast.

The Potter s Eye

The Potter s Eye

The Potter s Eye

Traces the history of North Carolina pottery from the nineteenth century to the present day, demonstrating the intriguing historic and aesthetic relationships that link pots produced in North Carolina to pottery traditions in Europe and Asia, in New England, and in the neighboring state of South Carolina.

Exploring North Carolina s Natural Areas

Exploring North Carolina s Natural Areas

Exploring North Carolina s Natural Areas

North Carolina boasts a natural environment of exceptional richness and diversity. From the mountains to the coast, the state is home to an extraordinary variety of publicly accessible sites that showcase aspects of its ecology, geology, biology, and natural history. This book leads the reader on thirty-eight field trips to some of the most interesting and instructive of these natural landscapes. Written by leading naturalists from across the state, this collection of "eco-tours" includes excursions to each of its four major regions: the coast, the Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, and the mountains. Each trip traces a thirty- to seventy-mile driving route that connects preserved areas, hiking trails, scenic overlooks, nature trails, and other sites of interest. All entries provide a map of the route, describe what can be seen and learned along the way, and discuss especially noteworthy features. An essential resource for anyone who treasures North Carolina's natural heritage, this book will inspire and inform travelers throughout the Tar Heel state.