Other Inquisitions 1937 1952

Other Inquisitions  1937 1952

Other Inquisitions 1937 1952

This remarkable book by one of the great writers of our time includes essays on a proposed universal language, a justification of suicide, a refutation of time, the nature of dreams, and the intricacies of linguistic forms. Borges comments on such literary figures as Pascal, Coleridge, Cervantes, Hawthorne, Whitman, Valéry, Wilde, Shaw, and Kafka. With extraordinary grace and erudition, he ranges in time, place, and subject from Omar Khayyam to Joseph Conrad, from ancient China to modern England, from world revolution to contemporary slang.

Do the Americas Have a Common Literature

Do the Americas Have a Common Literature

Do the Americas Have a Common Literature

This volume takes an important step toward the discovery of a common critical heritage that joins the diverse literatures of North America and Latin America. Traditionally, literary criticism has treated the literature of the Americas as “New World” literature, examining it in relation to its “Old World”—usually European—counterparts. This collection of essays redirects the Eurocentric focus of earlier scholarship and identifies a distinctive pan-American consciousness. The essays here place the literature of the Americas in a hemispheric context by drawing on approaches derived from various schools of contemporary critical thought—Marxism, feminism, culture studies, semiotics, reception aesthetics, and poststructuralism. As part of their search for a distinctly New World literary idiom, the contributors engage not only the major North American and Spanish American writers, but also such “marginal” or “minor” literatures as Chicano, African American, Brazilian, and Québecois. In identifying areas of agreement and confluence, this work lays the groundwork for finding historical, ideological, and cultural homogeneity in the imaginative writing of the Americas. Contributors. Lois Parkinson Zamora, David T. Haberly, José David Saldívar, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, José Piedra, Doris Sommer, Enrico Mario Santí, Eduardo González, John Irwin, Wendy B. Faris, René Prieto, Jonathan Monroe, Gustavo Pérez Firmat

Modernity as Exception and Miracle

Modernity as Exception and Miracle

Modernity as Exception and Miracle

Translated from the Spanish De lo extraordinario: Nominalismo y Modernidad, this book argues that a defining aspect of modernity is an ever-increasing pursuit of, and need for, what Eduardo Sabrovsky calls "the extraordinary," a term that encompasses both the exception and the miraculous. Sabrovsky shows the degree to which Robert Musil's novel The Man without Qualities functions as a paradoxical paradigm of the extraordinary, and he extends the theoretical insights drawn from Musil's magisterial work through a series of inquiries into cardinal elements of modern literature, material culture, historiography, physical science, psychoanalysis, and political theory. Sabrovsky demonstrates how the extraordinary condition of modernity emerges from the debates conducted by the last representatives of medieval scholasticism in which nominalism defeated realism, and he resituates the results of this triumph of nominalism in the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and Georges Bataille, among others.

H G Wells and All Things Russian

H G  Wells and All Things Russian

H G Wells and All Things Russian

H. G. Wells and All Things Russian is a fertile terrain for research and this volume will be the first to devote itself entirely to the theme. Wells was an astute student of Russian literature, culture and history, and the Russians, in turn, became eager students of Wells’s views and works. During the Soviet years, in fact, no significant foreign author was safer for Soviet critics to praise than H. G. Wells. The reason was obvious. He had met – and largely approved of – Lenin, was a close friend of the Soviet literary giant Maxim Gorky and, in general, expressed much respect for Russia’s evolving Communist experiment, even after it fell into Stalin’s hands. While Wells’s attitude towards the Soviet Union was, nevertheless, often ambivalent, there is definitely nothing ambiguous about the tremendous influence his works had on Russian literary and cultural life.

G K Chesterton

G K  Chesterton

G K Chesterton

Novelist, essayist, poet, playwright, historian, journalist, Christian apologist, literary and social critic, G.K. Chesterton was one of the most protean and prolific writers of his age, perhaps of any age. Bernard Shaw called him a 'colossal genius'. Most readers have certainly found him too big to see whole, and have therefore cut him in half. The 'poet' is severed from the philosopher; he is treated either as a phrase-maker or as a mystic; his quirky writings are enjoyed as an aesthetic end in themselves, or they are praised for their contribution to theology. In this close reading of his work, Michael D. Hurley brings Chesterton's divided selves together. Covering the full range of his diverse genres, Hurley shows how Chesterton thinks through language, in ways that confound attempts to read him as a thinker without first appreciating him as a writer.

Coded Characters

Coded Characters

Coded Characters

Artwork by Jill Scott. Contributions by Roy Ascott. Text by Robert Atkins, Anne Marsh, Yvonne Spielmann.

Architecture and Literature

Architecture and Literature

Architecture and Literature


An Artificial Wilderness

An Artificial Wilderness

An Artificial Wilderness

Sven Birkerts explores the impacts of two world wars and the collapse of the assumption of Humanism on a diverse group of modern writers, bringing to light the aspect of a world literature promoting an international perspective. Photographs.